Education and
Training Help
Money, information and services to go to college or
train for a better job ...

Matthew lesko General Help Health Help Mental Health Help Housing Help Business Help
Job Help Education and Training Help Financial and Estate Help Legal Help Help for Kids and Pets I Want to Help


Free Culinary Education Program
Free Food and Culinary Education Program
State Job Training - New Jersey

State Job Training - New York
State College Money - New Jersey
State College Money - New York
Federal Money for College

Get Loans Directly From Your School
$15,000 For Graduate Students To Study Overseas
Travel Overseas For Your Doctorate Research
$4,000 Grants For Students Having Trouble Paying Tuition
Money For a Foreign Language Degree
Money For Students And Teachers To Travel Overseas
Money For Ph.D. Students To Do Research Overseas
Loans To Go To School
Work-Study Program Pays For School
Low-Interest Student Loans
Get Help To Study
$2,700 Grants To Go To School
Aid For Students Who Want To Help The Deaf
Money For Students Interested In Helping People With Disabilities
$25,400 Per Year For Graduate Study
$1,500 Per Year For College
Money For Graduate Study
Grants For Those Who Have Trouble Paying Tuition
Grants for the Environment
Money For Public Service Students
Spend A Semester In A Department Of Energy Lab
Money For Minority Students At Junior Colleges Who Are Energy Majors
Part-Time Jobs In The Government
Internships For Graduate Students To Work At 54 Government Agencies
Money for Health Profession Students
Money For Primary Care Students
Loans For Disadvantaged Health Profession Students
Money For Nursing Students
Money For Faculty Loan Repayments
Scholarships For Disadvantaged Health Profession Students
Money For American Indians Who Want To Be Health Care Professionals
Health Professions Scholarships For American Indians
Opportunity To Receive College Tuition From NSA
Money For American Indians Who Need Extra Studies For Health Care Program
Scholarships For Health Care Professionals
Money For Dental Students For Advanced Residency Training
Health Careers Opportunity Program
Grants for Native Hawaiian Students
Money For Nursing Students To Repay Their Loans
Money For Health Professionals
Scholarships For National Health Service Corps
$30,000 To Study The Humanities
Grants For Graduate Training In Family Medicine
Money To Train To Be A Professional Nurse
Money For Job Safety and Health Training
Money For Health Care Training In Rural Areas
Grants For Pediatric Training
Money For Disadvantaged Students To Study Nursing
Money To Repay Loans
Money For Minorities Pursuing a Health Professions Education
Get Your Loans Paid Through Indian Health Service
Financial Assistance For Disadvantaged Health Professions Students
Money To Train To Become A Nurse Anesthetist
Money To Study Food
Money To Help Math Students and Summer Scientists
Money To Study Community Planning and Development
Money To Study Housing Issues
Money For Members Of Indian Tribes To Go To College
Money To Study The Break Up Of The USSR
Money For Criminal Justice Majors
$3,000 A Year To Be A Merchant Marine
All Expenses Plus $558 A Month To Be A Merchant Marine
Money For Social, Behavioral, And Economic Sciences Students

Money For Disabled Veterans To Go To College
Money For Spouses And Children Of Deceased Or Disabled Veterans To Go To School
Money For Vietnam Veterans To Go To School
Money For Retired Veterans To Go To School
Volunteer And Earn Money To Pay For School
Money To Study The Drug Abuse Field
Fellowships for Creative Writers and Translators
Scholarships for Minorities
College Scholarship for Survivors of Victims of Terrorist Attacks
Scholarships for Surviving Children of Pentagon Attack
Education For Dependents of Public Safety Officers Killed or Disabled in The Line of Duty
Free College Education for Children and Spouses of Disaster Victims
Free Computers and Technology Training
Scholarship Money for Children of Firefighters Killed in the Line of Duty
College Scholarship Funds for Deaf & Blind Students
Connecticut Education Programs
District of Columbia Education Programs
Maryland Education Programs
Pennsylvania Education Programs
Virginia Education Programs
Government to Reduce Victims' College Loans
$10,322 To Train For A New Career in Connecticut
$16,034.00 To Train For A New Career in DC
Up To $14,280 To Train For A New Career in Maryland
$10,140 To Train For A New Career in New Jersey
$10,530 To Train For A New Career in New York
Up To $10,468 To Train For A New Career in Virginia
Opportunities for the Blind
Money for College for Navy Personnel
Money for College for Surviving Children
Education Fund to Benefit Victims' Children

$2,500 in Scholarship Money for Victims' Children
Law Firm Offers Scholarship at NYU
Scholarships and Other Support for Families of Fallen Firefighters
Money for College for Children Who Have Lost a Parent in the Line of Duty
Scholarship Money for Victims' Children
Scholarship Fund for Victims' Spouses and Children
Scholarships For Victims' Children or Those Disabled
Education Fund for Victims' Children
Free Groceries and Job Training for DC Residents
Free Job Training and Employment Services
Scholarship Fund for Victims' Families
350 Colleges You Can Go To For Free - State-by-State Listing
Over 400 Programs Worth $3 Billion In State Aid For Students
How To Get A GED and More Adult Education
How To Make A High School Diploma Worth More
Check Your State For Training Money and Help


Free Culinary Education Program
The DC Central Kitchen Inc. is a non-profit organization that works to safely recover surplus food from area food service businesses to feed children and adults at social service agencies throughout DC, Maryland, and Virginia. In addition, they train unemployed individuals in basic culinary skills through the preparation of balanced meals from donated food items. The training program is a 12-week course which has a weekly stipend. Contact D.C. Central Kitchen, 425 Second Street NW, Washington, DC 2001; 202-234-0707; Fax: 202-986-1051; Cynthia Rowland is the General Manager; {www.dccentalkitchen.org}.
back to top

Free Food and Culinary Education Program
America's Second Harvest is a national organization that runs community kitchens that train unemployed individuals in the culinary profession, while they prepare balanced meals from surplus food for those in need. Contact America's Second Harvest, 35 East Wacker Drive, #2000, Chicago, IL 60601; 800-771-2303; {www.secondharvest.org}.
back to top

State Job Training
New Jersey

  • One-Stop Career Center: Workforce New Jersey, Division of Employment and Training, P.O. Box 005, Trenton, NJ 08625; 609-292-5005; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
  • New Jersey Department of Labor: John Fitch Plaza, P.O. Box 110, Trenton, NJ 08625; 609-292-2323; {www.state.nj.us/labor}.
  • New Jersey NAWBO Excel, Harriet Scooler, Project Director, 225 Hamilton St., Bound Brook, NJ 08805-2042; 732-560-9607; Fax: 732-560-9687; {njawbo@njawbo.org}; {www.njawbo.org}.
  • Displaced Home makers Network of NJ, Inc., Circle Branch P.O. Box 5545, Trenton, NJ 08638-5545; 732-774-3363.
  • The Women's Fund of NJ, 355 Chestnut Street, Union, NJ 07083; 908-851-7774; Fax: 908-851-7775; {www.wfnj.org/Displaced%20Home makers.htm}.
  • Elaine Muller, County College of Morris, 214 Center Grove Road, SCC/133, Randolph, NJ 07869-2086; 973-328-5025; Fax: 973-328-5146.
  • Friendship Pregnancy Centers, 82 Speedwell Avenue, Morristown, NJ 07960; 973-538-0967; 888-324-6673; 888-3Choose; 973-644-2960.
  • Occupational Training Center, 10 Ridgedale Avenue, Cedar Knolls, NJ 07927; 973-538-8822
  • Green Thumb, Inc., Morris County Office, 20 Hillside Terrace, Newton, NJ 07860; 973-383-3621.
  • Bergen Employment Action Project (BEAP), AFL-CIO Community Services, 214 State St., Hackensack, NJ 07601; 201-489-7476.
  • Bergen WorkForce Center, 540 Hudson St., Hackensack, NJ 07601; 201-329-9600; {www.users.bergen.org/~margot/}.
  • WISE Women's Center, Room 3276 - 3rd Level, Yellow Area, Essex County College, 303 University Ave., Newark, NJ 07102; 973-877-3395.
  • St. Francis Counseling Service, 4700 Long Beach Blvd., Brant Beach, NJ 08008; 609-494-1554.
  • Center For People In Transition at Gloucester County College, 1400 Tanyard Rd. Sewell, NJ 08080; 609-464-5229.
  • Women's Rights Information Center, 108 West Palisade Ave., Englewood, NJ 07631; 201-568-1166.
  • Training for Trades and Technology, Bergen County Technical Institute, Career and Life Counseling Center, 540 Hudson St., Hackensack, NJ 07601; 201-329-9600, ext. 5200.
  • Training, Recruiting, Educating and Employing, Inc., Middlesex County Vocational School System, 256 Easton Ave., New Brunswick, NJ 08901; 732-745-4721.
  • Women Working Technical, Career and Life Counseling Center, Bergen County Technical Institute, 540 Hudson St., Hackensack, NJ 07601; 201-343-6000, ext. 2270.
  • New Beginnings for Displaced Home makers, Project Self-Sufficiency, P.O. Box 322, Sparta, NJ 07871; 201-383-5129.
    back to top

New York

  • One-Stop Career Center: Workforce Development System, Department of Labor, Workforce Development, Building 12, State Office Campus, Albany, NY 12240; 518-457-3584; {www.wdsny.org}.
  • New York Department of Labor: Building 12, State Campus, Albany, NY 12240; 518-457-5519; {www.labor.state.ny.us}.
  • Women Work! Regional Representative, Region II, Iren Navero Hammel, Queens Women's Network, 161-10 Jamaica Ave., Suite 416, Jamaica, NY 11432; 718-657-6200; Fax: 718-739-6974.
  • Center for Employment and Training, 1071 East Tremont Ave., Bronx, NY 10460; 718-893-4582; Fax: 718-893-4680; {s_coaxum@ cetmail.cfet.org}; or 346 West 17th Street, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10011; 212-924-2272; Fax: 212-924-7773; {CETNY@aol.com}.
  • American Woman's Economic Development Corporation (AWED), Suzanne Tufts, President and CEO, 71 Vanderbilt Avenue, Suite 320, New York, NY 10169; 212-692-9100; Fax: 212-692-9296.
  • Empire State Development, One Commerce Plaza, Albany, NY 12245; 518-474-7756; 800-STATE-NY; {www.empire.state.ny.us}.
  • Women's Venture Fund, Inc., 155 East 42nd Street, Suite 316, New York, NY 10017; 212-972-1146; Fax: 212-972-1167.
  • Everywoman Opportunity Center, 237 Main Street Suite 330, Buffalo, NY 14203; 716-847-1120; Fax: 716-847-1550; {ewocbuf@ everywoman.org}.
  • Everywoman Opportunity Center, Greenacres Blvd. Room 108, 205 Yorkshire Rd., Tonawanda, NY 14150; 716-837-2260; Fax: 716-837-0124; {ewocton@everywoman.org}; {www.everywoman.org}.
  • Everywoman Opportunity Center, 10825 Bennett Road, Dunkirk, NY 14048; 716-366-7020; Fax: 716-366-1925; {ewocdf@everywoman.org}.
  • Everywoman Opportunity Center, 800 Main St., Third Floor, Niagara Falls, NY 14301; 716-282-8472: Fax: 716-282-4868; {ewocnf@everywoman.org}.
  • Mary Snodgrass, Everywoman Opportunity Center, 265 N. Union Street, Olean, NY 14760; 716-373-4013; Fax: 716-373-7668; {ewocol@everywoman.org}.
  • Agudath Israel/Fresh Start DHC, 1756 Ocean Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11230; 718-338-9200; Fax: 718-377-3151.
  • Bensonhurst DHC, 1708 West 10th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11214; 718-946-8570; Fax: 718-946-8572; {bicdhp@erols.com}.
  • Bronx Community College DHC, 181 S. Street & University Ave., Gould Residence Hall, Room 309, Bronx, NY 10453; 718-289-5824; Fax: 718-289-6341.
  • Merble Reagon, Executive Director, Women's Center for Education & Career, Advancement, 45 John Street, Suite 605, New York, NY 10038; 212-964-8934; Fax: 212-964-0222.
  • Queen's Women's Network DHC, 161-10 Jamaica Ave., Suite 207, Jamaica, NY 11432; 718-657-6200; Fax: 718-739-6974.
  • YWCA - NYC DHC, 610 Lexington Ave., New York, NY 10022; 212-735-9729; Fax: 212-759-3158.
  • DHC/Suffolk Vocational Center, Bailey Hall, S. Oaks Hospital, 400 Sunrise Highway, Amityville, NY 11701; 516-598-0108; Fax: 516-264-0432; {fsutherland@fegs.org}.
  • S.C. Dept. of Labor, Veterans Memorial Highway, BLDG 17, North County Complex, Hauppage, NY 11788; 516-853-6620; 516-853-6510.
  • Women In Self Help, 503 Fifth Ave., 4th Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11215; 718-768-9700; Fax: 718-369-3192; {CMarsh503@aol.com}.
  • Displaced Home makers Multiservice Center, Economic Opportunity Commissions, DHMC, 134 Jackson St., Hempstead, NY 11550; 516-486-2800; Fax: 516-292-3176.
  • Westchester Comm. College, Project Transition, 75 Grasslands Rd., Valhalla, NY 10595; 914-785-6825; Fax: 914-785-6508; {mbw@wcc.co.westchester.ny.us}.
  • Displaced Home makers Women-in-Transition, Rockland Co. Guidance Ctr., Displaced Home maker Program, 83 Main Street, Nyack, NY 10960; 914-358-9390; Fax: 914-358-4980.
  • Albany Displaced Home maker Center, Albany DHC, 227 S. Pearl Street, Albany, NY 12202; 518-434-3103; Fax: 518-434-3211; {adhc@albany.net}; {www.albany.net/~adhc}.
  • Displaced Home makers Center Of Tompkins County, Tompkins County DHC, 315 N. Tioga Street, Ithaca, NY 14850; 607-272-1520; Fax: 607-272-2251; {dhc@clarityconnect.com}.
  • Lifespan's Displaced Home maker Center, Lifespan's DH Program, 79 N. Clinton Avenue, Rochester, NY 14604; 716-454-3224 Ext. 133; Fax: 716-454-3882; {les1job@aol.com}.
  • Greater Utica Displaced Home maker Center, Utica DHC, State Office Bldg., Room 209, 207 Genesee Street, Utica, NY 13501; 315-793-2790; Fax: 315-793-2509; {dhc207@dreamscape.com}.
  • Syracuse Displaced Home maker Program, Regional Learning Service DHC, 3049 East Genesee St., Syracuse, NY 13224-1644; 315-446-0550; Fax: 315-446-5869.
  • Displaced Home maker Program - Schenectady Community Action Program, Schenectady/ Fulmont DHC, C/O SCAP, 433 State Street, Schenectady. NY 12305; 518-374-9181, Fax: 518-374-9190.
  • Project Lift, Fulton-Montgomery Community College, 2805 State Highway 67, Johnstown, NY 12095; 518-762-4651 Ext. 346; Fax: 518-762-4334; {dpiurek@fmcc.suny.edu}.
  • Schoharie Displaced Home maker Program, 150 E. Main Street, Cobleskill, NY 12043; 518-234-2568, Fax: 518-234-3507; {sccapinc@midtel.net}.
  • Nontraditional Employment for Women, 243 West 20th St., New York, NY 10011; 212-627-6252.
  • Cooperative Home Care Associates, 349 East 149th St., Bronx, NY 10451; 718-993-7104.
  • New York State Career Options Institute, 6 British American Blvd., Suite G, Latham, NY 12110; 518-786-3236.
  • Access for Women, New York City Technical College, 300 Jay Street, M 407, Brooklyn, NY 11201; 718-260-5730.
  • Small Contractor's Assistance Program, Coordinator/ Counselor, Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, Office of Continuing Education, 199 Chambers St., New York, NY 10007; 212-346-8100.
    back to top



State College Money
New Jersey
New Jersey Department of Higher Education
Office of Student Assistance
4 Quakerbridge Plaza, CN 540
Trenton, NJ 08625
609-292-4310
800-792-8670
www.hesaa.org
General requirements: Applicant must be a New Jersey resident.

Programs Available:
$6050 A Year In Grants To Full-Time Students (Tuition Aid Grants)
Grants, Tutoring, and Counseling To Students On Limited Income (Educational Opportunity Fund Grants (EOF))
Grants To Students With High SAT Scores (Edward J. Bloustein Distinguished Scholar Program)
Tuition to Disadvantaged/Minority Students In A Program Leading Toward A Medical Degree At University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (Martin Luther King Jr. Physician-Dentist Scholarship)
Tuition, Fees, Room and Board To Disadvantaged/ Ethnic Minority Students In The Minority Student Program at Rutgers University School for Law (C.Clyde Ferguson Law Scholarship)
$1,000 Per Year To Top 10% Of Class From An Urban Area (Urban Scholars)
Tuition For Spouses And Children Of Emergency Service Personnel And Law Enforcement Officers Killed In The Line Of Duty (Public Tuition Benefits Program)
Up To $70,000 Student Loan Redemption For Physicians and Dentist Located In Needy Areas Of New Jersey (Physician and Dentist Loan Redemption Program)
Attend A Veterinarian School Out-Of-State (Veterinary Medicine Scholarship)
back to top


New York
New York Higher Education Services Corporation
Grants and Scholarship Information
99 Washington Avenue
Albany, NY 12255
888-NYSHESC
518-473-1574
www.hesc.com
General requirements; Applicants must be residents of New York. Amounts awarded are determined by the type of school your are planning to attend, your financial state (net taxable income), year in which the award is received, and amount of tuition.

Programs Available:
Grants For Full-Time Students (Tuition Assistance Program (TAP))
Grants For Part-Time Students (Aid For Part-Time Study (APTS)
Money For Accounting, Veterinary, and Students Pursuing 19 Other Professional Careers (New York Regents Professional Opportunity Scholarships)
Money For Students Studying Medicine Or Dentistry (New York Regents Health Care Opportunity Scholarships)
Grants To Dependents Of Deceased Or Disabled Veterans (Regents Award For Child Of Veteran)
Tuition And Fees For Dependents Of Deceased Police Officers And Fire Fighters (Memorial Scholarships
For Children Of Deceased Police Officers And Fire Fighters)
$1,000 Per Semester For Vietnam Veterans (Vietnam Veterans Tuition Awards)
Outstanding High School Seniors Receive Up To $1,500 A Year (Scholarships For Academic Excellence)
Up To $15,000 For A Career As A Midwife, Nurse Practitioner, Or Physician Assistant (New York State Primary Care Service Corps)
Up To $1,000 Per Semester For Persian Gulf Veterans (Persian Gulf Veterans Tuition Awards)

back to top

Federal Money for College
Most people have heard of the federal government's largest money programs for students like the Pell Grant Program and the Guaranteed Student Loan program. But did you know that the federal government is the single largest source of money for students - whether they show financial need or not? It's true, but very few people are aware of the many grant programs in place and just waiting to give money to those students smart enough to find out about them. These little known programs provide students with:

· $15,000 to do graduate studies in housing related topics for the Department of Housing and Urban Development
· Money to finance a graduate degree in criminal justice from the Department of Justice
· $14,000 to get a graduate degree in foreign languages from the Department of Education
· $8,800 plus tuition and expenses to be a nurse from the Department of Health and Human Services

How To Apply
Requirements and application procedures vary widely from program to program. Some programs accept applications once a year, while others award money on a year round basis. Some programs require you to apply directly to the main funding office in Washington, DC, while other programs distribute the money to local organizations, which then distribute funds to individuals. Many of the programs give the money directly to the schools, and then the schools distribute it. For those, you need to request a listing of the schools that receive the funds.

All these federal programs are listed in the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance which is available in most libraries. This catalogue lists all the government grant and loan programs available. The program name and number in parenthesis refer to this publication. You can search the catalog easily at {www.cfda.gov}.
back to top

Get Loans Directly From Your School
(Federal Direct Loan 84.268)
The Direct Loan Program was begun to provide loans directly to students through schools, rather than through private lenders. Borrowers complete an application, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), for all Department student financial aid programs. Schools receive the funds and then disburse them to students.

There are four different direct loans: Federal Direct Stafford/Ford Loans are for students who demonstrate financial need; Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford/Ford Loans are for students regardless of financial need; Federal Direct PLUS Loans are for parents to pay for their children's education; and Federal Direct Consolidation Loans help combine one or more federal education loans into one loan. The amount one can borrow depends upon dependent/independent status of student and year in school. There are several different repayment options including income contingent repayment plan. Interest rates for loans vary each year.

For your Free Application for Federal Student Aid, contact Federal Student Aid Information Center, P.O. Box 84, Washington, DC 20044; 800-433-3243. Contact: U.S. Department of Education, Direct Loan Payment Center, P.O. Box 746000, Atlanta, GA 30374; 800-557-7394; {www.ed.gov/DirectLoan/fact.html}.
back to top

$15,000 For Graduate Students To Study Overseas
(Educational Exchange - Graduate Students 19.400)
Graduate students who would like to spend a year studying overseas can apply for the Fulbright Program where if accepted, they will receive round trip transportation, tuition, books, maintenance for one academic year in one country, and health insurance. Students apply through the Fulbright program adviser located at their college or university, or they can apply as an at-large applicant by contacting the New York office of the Institute of International Education. Money available: $14,500,000. The average award per student is $21,000, but awards can range anywhere from $1,200 to $40,000. Contact Institute of International Education, 809 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017; 212-984-5330; {www.iie.org}.
back to top

Travel Overseas For Your Doctorate Research
(International Overseas Doctoral Dissertation 84.022)
This program provides opportunities for graduate students to engage in full-time dissertation research abroad in modern foreign language and area studies with the exception of Western Europe. The program is designed to develop research knowledge and capability in world areas not widely included in American curricula. Money available: $3,141,000. Grants average $22,000. For more information, contact Advanced Training and Research Team, International Education and Graduate Programs Service, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202; 202-401-9774; {www.ed.gov}.
back to top

$4,000 Grants For Students Having Trouble Paying Tuition
(Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grants 84.007)
If you are working towards your first undergraduate baccalaureate degree and are having trouble paying the bills, you may qualify for money through the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) program. Grants are for undergraduate study and range from $100 to $4000 per academic year, with the student eligible to receive a FSEOG for the time it takes to complete their first degree. Students should contact the Financial Aid office of the school they attend or plan to attend for information regarding application. A student Financial Aid Handbook is available, as is a list of grantee institutions by contacting the Federal Student Aid Information Center, P.O. Box 84, Washington, DC 20044; 800-433-3243. Money available: $619,000,0900. Estimated average award is $745. Contact Student Financial Assistance Program, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Post-Secondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202; 202-708-8242; {www.ed.gov}.
back to top

Money For a Foreign Language Degree
(National Resource Centers and Fellowships Program for Language and Area or Language and International Studies 84.015)
In this global world, foreign languages and international studies are becoming increasingly important. The Department of Education has funds to support centers which promote instruction in foreign language and international studies at colleges and universities. In addition, there are graduate fellowships to pursue this course of study in order to develop a pool of international experts to meet our nation's needs. Funds for centers may be used for instructional costs of language and area and international studies programs, administration, lectures and conferences, library resources and staff, and travel. Grants for fellowships include tuition, fees, and a basic subsistence allowance. Students must apply to those institutions that received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money, contact the office listed below. Students can contact these institutions directly. Money available: Grants: $13,719,000. Contact International Studies Branch, Center for International Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, Seventh and D Sts., SW, Washington, DC 20202; 202-401-9783; {www.ed.gov/office/OPE/HEP/iegps/flasf.html}
back to top

Money For Students And Teachers To Travel Overseas
(Fulbright-Hays Training Grants - Group Projects Abroad 84.021)
The program objective is to help educational institutions improve their programs in modern foreign language and area studies through overseas study/travel seminar group research, advanced foreign language training, and curriculum development. Funds are available to support overseas study/travel seminar group research and advanced foreign language training. Grant funds may be used for international travel, maintenance allowances, rental of instructional facilities in the country of study, and more. Money available: $2,326,000. Contact Office of Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202; 202-502-7700; {www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/HEP/iegps/gpa.html}.
back to top

Money For Ph.D. Students To Do Research Overseas
(Fulbright-Hays Training Grants - Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad 84.022)
Graduate students now have the opportunity to engage in full time dissertation research abroad in modern foreign language and area studies. This program is designed to develop research knowledge and capability in world areas not widely included in American curricula. The grant includes a basic stipend, round trip airfare, baggage allowance, tuition payments, local travel, and more. Candidates apply directly to the institutions at which they are enrolled. Money available: $2,072,000. Contact Karla Ver Bryck Block, Advanced Training and Research Branch, Center for International Education, Office of Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202, 202-502-7700, {www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/HEP/iegps/ddrap.html}
back to top

Loans To Go To School
(Federal Family Education Loans
Guaranteed loans for educational expenses are available from eligible lenders such as banks, credit unions, savings and loan association, pension funds, insurance companies, and schools to vocational, undergraduate, and graduate students enrolled at eligible institutions. Loans can be used to pay the costs associated with obtaining a college education. The PLUS program is also available, which allows parents to borrow for their dependent student. More information is available by contacting the lending institution regarding the loans available and the application procedure. Money available: $21,032,000,000. Contact Division of Policy Development, Policy, Training and Analysis Service Office of Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC 20202; 202-708-8242; {www.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/Students/}.
back to top

Work-Study Program Pays For School
(Federal Work-Study Program 84.033)
Part-time employment is available to students to help meet education expenses. This program pays an hourly wage to undergraduates. Graduate students may be paid by the hour or may receive a salary. There are Federal Work-Study jobs both on and off campus. Money can be used to help defray the costs of higher education. Students should contact the educational institution they attend or plan to attend to find out about application procedures. A Student Financial Aid Handbook is available, as is a list of grantee institutions, by contacting Federal Student Aid Information Center, P.O. Box 84, Washington, DC 20044; 800-433-3243. Money available: $900,000,000. Contact Division of Policy Development, Student Financial Assistance Programs, Office of Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education, 400 Maryland Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202; 202-708-8242; {www.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/Students}.
back to top

Low-Interest Student Loans
(Federal Perkins Loan Program 84.038)
Low-interest loans are available to eligible post-secondary students with demonstrated financial need to help meet educational expenses. Students can borrow money to meet the costs of school. These loans are for students with exceptional financial need. To apply, contact the Financial Aid office of the school you attend or plan to attend. A student Financial Aid Handbook is available, as well as a list of grantee institutions by contacting the Federal Student Aid Information Center, P.O. Box 84, Washington, DC 20044; 800-433-3242. Money available: $60,000,000. Contact Division of Policy Development Student Financial Assistance Programs, Office of Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202; 202-708-8242; {www.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/Students}.
back to top

Get Help To Study
(TRIO Upward Bound 84.047)
This program generates skills and motivation necessary for success in education beyond high school among low income and potential first-generation college students and veterans. The goal of the program is to increase the academic performance and motivational levels of eligible enrollees so that they have a better chance of completing secondary school and successfully pursuing postsecondary educational programs. Eligible students must have completed the eighth grade and be between the ages of 13 and 19, enrolled in high school, and need such services to achieve their goal of college. The program provides instruction in reading, writing, study skills, and mathematics. They can provide academic, financial, or personal counseling, tutorial services, information on student financial assistance, assistance with college and financial aid applications, and more. Contact your local Upward Bound project to find out more about this program. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $243,000,000. Contact Division of Student Services, Education Outreach Branch, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Ave., SW, Room 5065, Washington, DC 20202; 202-260-1494; {www.ed.gov/offices/OPE}.
back to top

$2,700 Grants To Go To School
(Federal Pell Grant Program 84.063)
Grants are available to students with financial need to help meet education expenses. Grants may not exceed $2,700 per year, and must be used for student's first bachelor's or other professional degree. Once an application is completed, the student's financial eligibility for assistance is calculated and the agency then notifies the student of eligibility. A Free Application for Federal Student Aid is available from the Federal Student Aid Information Center, P.O. Box 84, Washington, DC 20044; 800-433-3243. Money available: $7,594,000,000. Contact Division of Policy Development, Student Financial Assistance Programs, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202; 202-708-8242; {www.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/Students/}.
back to top

Aid For Students Who Want To Help The Deaf
(Training Interpreters For Individuals Who Are Deaf and Individuals Who Are Deaf-Blind 84.160)
This program supports projects that train new interpreters and improve the skills of manual, oral, and cued speech interpreters already providing services to individuals who are deaf and individuals who are deaf-blind. Grants are awarded for training, classroom instruction, workshops, seminars, and field placements. Ten grants are awarded to colleges and universities that have ongoing sign language/oral interpreter training programs of proven merit. Programs include training courses connected to degree programs in interpreting; short term practical training leading to interpreter certification; and workshops, seminars, and practices. Students must apply to those institutions that have received the program money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $2,100,000. Contact Deafness and Communicative Disorders Branch, Rehabilitation Services Administration, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202; 202-205-9152; 202-205-8352 TTY; {www.ed.gov/ offices/OSERS/RSA/PGMS/RT/scholrsp.html}.
back to top

Money For Students Interested In Helping People With Disabilities
(Rehabilitation Training 84.129)
This program supports projects that provide new personnel and improve the skills of existing personnel trained in providing vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities in areas targeted as having personnel shortages. Training grants are provided in fields directly related to the vocational and independent living rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, such as rehabilitation counseling, independent living, rehabilitation medicine, physical and occupational therapy, speech-language, pathology and audiology, and more. Projects include residency scholarships in physical medicine and rehabilitation; teaching and graduate scholarships in rehabilitation counseling; and more. Students must apply to those institutions that have received the program money. A catalogue of projects is available that provides address, phone number, contact person, and an abstract for each grant awarded. Money available: $17,200,000. Contact Rehabilitation Services Administration, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC 20202; 202-205-8926; {www.ed.gov/offices/OSERS/RSA/PGMS/RT/scholrsp.html}.
back to top

$25,400 Per Year For Graduate Study
(Jacob K. Javits Fellowships 84.170)
This program provides fellowships to individuals of superior ability for graduate study in the fields within the arts, humanities, and social sciences. Money can be used to support a student while he or she attends an institution of higher education. To apply for these fellowships contact the Federal Student Aid Information Center, P.O. Box 84, Washington, DC 20044; 800-4-FED-AID. Money available: $5,931,000. Contact Higher Education Programs, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, Washington, DC 20202; 202-502-7700; {www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/HEP/iegps/javits.html}.
back to top

$1,500 Per Year For College
(Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarships 84.185)
Scholarships are available to exceptionally able students who show promise of continued academic achievement. Scholarships for up to four years to study at any institution of higher education are available through grants to the states. The scholarships are awarded on the basis of merit and are renewable. To apply for this grant award, interested applicants must contact their state educational agency, which administers this program. Money available: $39,288,000. Contact U.S. Department of Education, Office of Student Financial Assistance, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education, Division of Higher Education Incentive Programs, The Portals, Suite C-80, Washington, DC 20024; 202-502-7700; {www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/HEP/ idues/byrd.html}.
back to top

Money For Graduate Study
(Graduate Assistance In Areas Of National Need 84.200)
Fellowships are available through graduate academic departments to graduate students of superior ability who demonstrate financial need and are able to enhance the capacity to teach and conduct research in areas of national need. Designated academic areas change each year and are currently biology, chemistry, engineering, foreign languages, mathematics, and physics. Money can be used to support a student completing a graduate degree program. Students must apply to those institutions that have received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $26,800,000. Contact International Education and Graduate Programs Service, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202; 202-502-7700;
{www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/HEP/ iegps/gaann.html}.
back to top

Grants For Those Who Have Trouble Paying Tuition
(Ronald E. McNair Post Baccalaureate Achievement 84.217)
This program provides grants to institutions of higher education to prepare low income, first-generation college students and students underrepresented in graduate education for graduate study. Money can be used to pay the costs for research and other scholarly activities, summer internships, seminars, tutoring, academic counseling, and securing admission and financial assistance for graduate study. Students must apply to those institutions that have received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $23,540,000. Contact U.S. Department of Education, Division of Student Services, Office of Postsecondary Education, 600 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202; 202-502-7600; {www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/HEP/trio/mcnair.html}.
back to top

Grants for the Environment
(Training and Fellowships for the Environmental Protection Agency- 66.607)The funds for this program are to provide resources to allow for training and fellowships related to environmental issues. Money available $35,000,000. Grants range from $4,000 to $5,000,000. For more information, contact Environmental Protection Agency, Grants Administration Division, 3903R, 401 M St., SW, Washington, DC 20460; {www.epa.gov}.
back to top

Money For Public Service Students
(Harry S. Truman Scholarship Program 85.001)
A special scholarship program for college juniors has been established to encourage students to pursue careers in public service. Money can be used to support a student completing his or her undergraduate and graduate studies. A faculty representative is appointed for each school and is responsible for publicizing the scholarship program; soliciting recommendations on students with significant potential for leadership; conducting a competition on campus; and forwarding the institution's official nomination to the Truman Scholarship Review committee. For more information write to the Foundation listed above. Money available: $3,187,000. Contact Louis Blair, Executive Secretary Truman Scholarship Foundation, 712 Jackson Place, NW, Washington, DC 20006; 202-395-4831; {www.truman.gov}.
back to top

Spend A Semester In A Department Of Energy Lab
(Science and Engineering Research Semester 81.097)
The program objective is to give undergraduate students the opportunity to participate in hands-on research at the cutting edge of science at the Department of Energy laboratories, and to provide training and experience in the operation of sophisticated state-of-the-art equipment and instruments. Those students majoring in energy related fields can spend a semester at many of the Department of Energy's labs. The energy research must be concentrated in an area of the laboratory's ongoing research. Applications may be obtained by writing to ERULF, ORISE 36, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; 423-576-2478; {www.scied.science.doe.gov}. Money available: $2,500,000. Students receive a weekly stipend of $350. Contact Sue Ellen Walbridge, Office of Laboratory Management, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 20585; 202-586-7231.
back to top

Money For Minority Students At Junior Colleges Who Are Energy Majors
(Minority Technical Education Program 81.082)
The program objective is to provide scholarship funding to financially needy minority honor students pursuing training in energy related technologies and to develop linkages with energy industries. Scholarship funds are available to defray costs of tuition, books, tools, transportation, and laboratory fees for minority students attending junior colleges and majoring in energy related field. The students must apply to those institutions that received the money. For a listing of those institutions contact the office listed below. Money available: $382,000. Contact The Minority Energy Information Clearinghouse, Minority Economic IMPACT, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, U.S. Department of Energy, Forrestal Building, Washington, DC 20585; 202-586-8383; {www.hr.doe.gov/ed/OMEI/Omei.html}.
back to top

Part-Time Jobs In The Government
(Student Temporary Employment Program 27.003)
The program gives students 16 years of age and older an opportunity for part time temporary employment with federal agencies in order to allow them to continue their education without interruptions caused by financial pressures. The money can be used to pay expenses while attending school. Apply for this program through the youth division of the local office of the State Employment Service. Look in the government section of your phone book to find an office near you, or contact the Main State Employment Service office for referral to a local office. Contact Employment Service, Office of Personnel Management, 1900 E St., NW, Washington, DC 20415; 202-606-0830; {www.usajobs.opm.gov}.
back to top

Internships For Graduate Students To Work At 54 Government Agencies
(Presidential Management Intern Program 27.013)
The PMI Program is a two-year entry-level employment and career development program designed to attract to the federal civil service men and women with graduate degrees from diverse cultural and academic backgrounds. Interns will have demonstrated academic excellence, possess management and leadership potential, and have a commitment to and a clear interest in a public service career. Nominees for the PMI Program undergo a rigorous, competitive screening process. Being selected as a PMI Finalist is a first step, but does not guarantee a job. Agencies designate positions for the PMIs and each establishes its own procedures for considering and hiring PMIs. Once hired by agencies, PMIs are encouraged to work with their agencies to establish an "individual development plan." PMIs participate in training conferences, seminars, and congressional briefings. Money can be used to pay for expenses. An application form and more information can be requested by contacting the Career America Hotline at 912-757-3000. Contact Office of Personnel Management, Philadelphia Service Center, Federal Building, 600 Arch St., Philadelphia, PA 19106; 215-597-7136; {www.usajobs.opm.gov}.
back to top

Money for Health Profession Students
(Health Professions Student Loans 93.342)
The Health Professions Student Loan Program provides long-term, low interest rate loans to full-time financially needy students pursuing a degree in dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, pediatric medicine, or veterinary medicine. Under this program, funds are made available to schools for the establishment of revolving student loan funds. To apply for this loan, contact the student financial aid office at the school where you intend to apply for admission or where you are enrolled. Loans can not exceed tuition. The interest rate is 5%. A Health Professions Student Loan Fact Sheet is available from the office listed above. Money available: $5,000,000.
Contact Health Professions Student Loan Program, Division of Student Assistance, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration, Parklawn Building, Room 8-34, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-4776; {bhpr.hrsa.gov/dsa/}.
back to top

Money For Primary Care Students
(Health Professions Student Loans, Including Primary Care Loans 93.342)
The Primary Care Loan Program provides long-term low interest rate loans to full-time financially needy students pursuing a degree in allopathic or osteopathic medicine. Under this program, funds are made to schools to establish revolving student loan funds. Students must agree to enter and complete residency training in primary care and to practice in primary care until the loan is paid in full. To apply for this loan, contact the student financial aid office at the school where you intend to apply for admission or where you are enrolled. Loans cannot exceed tuition. Money available: $5,000,000. Contact Division of Student Assistance, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration, Parklawn Building, Room 8-34, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-4776; {bhpr.hrsa.gov/dsa/}.
back to top

Loans For Disadvantaged Health Profession Students
(Loans for Disadvantaged Students 93.342)
Loans for Disadvantaged Students Program provides funding to eligible health professions schools for the purpose of providing long-term, low-interest loans to assist full-time, financially needy, disadvantaged students to pursue a career in allopathic or osteopathic medicine, dentistry, optometry, podiatry, pharmacy, or veterinary medicine. To apply for this loan, contact the student financial aid office at the school where you intend to apply for admission or where you are enrolled. Loans For Disadvantaged Students Fact Sheet is available from the office listed below. Money available: $5,000,000. Contact Division of Student Assistance, Bureau of Health Professions' Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration, Parklawn Building, Room 8-34, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-4776; {bhpr.hrsa.gov/dsa/}.
back to top

Money For Nursing Students
(Nursing Student Loans 93.364)
The Nursing Student Loan program provides for long-term, low-interest loans to full-time and half-time financially needy students pursuing a course of study leading to a diploma, associate, baccalaureate or graduate degree in nursing. Federal funds for this program are allocated to accredited public or nonprofit nursing schools. These schools are responsible for selecting the recipients of loans and for determining the amount of assistance a student requires. To apply for this loan, contact the student financial aid office at the school where you intend to apply for admission or where you are enrolled. Interest rate is 5%. Money available: $3,000,000. Contact Division of Student Assistance, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration, Parklawn Building, Room 8-34, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-4776; {bhpr.hrsa.gov/dsa/}.
back to top

Money For Faculty Loan Repayments
(Disadvantaged Health Professions Faculty Loan Repayment Program 93.923)
The Faculty Loan Repayment Program provides a financial incentive for degree-trained health professionals from disadvantaged backgrounds to pursue an academic career. The health professional must agree to serve as a member of a faculty of a health professions school, providing teaching services for a minimum of two years, faculty for schools of medicine, nursing, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, pediatric medicine, optometry, veterinary medicine, public health, or a school that offers a graduate program in clinical psychology. The federal government, in turn, agrees to pay as much as $20,000 of the outstanding principal and interest on the individual's educational loans. To participate in the program, an individual must be from a disadvantaged background, must not have been a member of a faculty of any school at any time during the 18 month period preceding the date on which the program application is received, must have a degree or be enrolled as a full-time student in the final year of training leading to a degree in one of the eligible disciplines, and must have entered into a contract with an eligible health professions school to serve as a full-time faculty member for a minimum of two years. Money available: $1,061,000.
Contact Division of Student Assistance, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration, Parklawn Building, Room 8-34, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-1503; 888-275-4772; {bhpr.hrsa.gov/DSA/flrp/index.htm}.
back to top

Scholarships For Disadvantaged Health Profession Students
(Students From Disadvantaged Backgrounds 93.925)
The Scholarships For Disadvantaged Students program provides funds to eligible schools for the purpose of providing scholarships to full-time financially needy students from disadvantaged backgrounds enrolled in health professions and nursing programs. Under this program, funds are awarded to accredited schools of medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatric medicine, veterinary medicine, nursing (diploma, associate, baccalaureate, and graduate degree), public health, allied health (baccalaureate and graduate degree programs of dental hygiene, medical laboratory technology, occupational therapy, physical therapy, radiologic technology), and graduate programs in clinical psychology. The schools are responsible for selecting recipients, making reasonable determinations of need and disadvantaged student status, and providing scholarships that cannot exceed the student's financial need. To apply for this scholarship, contact the student financial aid office at the school where you intend to apply for admission or where you are enrolled. Money available: $18,000,000. Contact Division of Student Assistance, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration, Parklawn Building, Room 8-34, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-4776; {bhpr.hrsa.gov/dsa/}.
back to top

Money For American Indians Who Want To Be Health Care Professionals
(Health Professions Recruitment Program For Indians 93.970)
The program objective is to increase the number of American Indians and Alaskan Natives who become health professionals and money has been set aside to help identify students interested in the field and to assist them in enrolling schools. Some of the projects funded include the recruitment of American Indians into health care programs, a variety of retention services once students have enrolled, and scholarship support. Students should contact their school directly for assistance. Money available: $2,870,700. Contact Indian Health Service, Division of Health Professions Support, 12300 Twinbrook Parkway, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20852; 301-443-4242; {www.ihs.gov}.
back to top

Health Professions Scholarships For American Indians
(Health Professions Pregraduate Scholarship
Program for Indians 93.123)
The program objective is to provide scholarships to American Indians and Alaskan Natives for the purpose of completing pregraduate education leading to baccalaureate degree in the areas of pre-medicine or pre-dentistry. Money can be used to support a student while completing their degree. Contact the Indian Health Service for application information. Money available: $1,702,569. Awards range from $12,283 to $27,217. Contact Indian Health Service, Scholarship Program, 12300 Twinbrook Parkway, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20852; 301-443-6197; {www.ihs.gov}.
back to top

Opportunity To Receive College Tuition From NSA
(Mathematical Sciences Grants Program 12.901)
National Security Agency (NSA) will consider any student who meets the requirements below and who chooses a full-time college major in either computer science, electrical or computer engineering, languages or mathematics. Requirements consist of having a minimum SAT score of 1100 and a minimum composite ACT score of 25. Chosen students can receive college tuition, reimbursement for books, year-round salary, summer work and have a guaranteed job with the NSA after graduation. Students must work for NSA for one and a half times their length of study, which is usually about five years. Money available: $2,600,000. Contact National Security Agency, Manager, Undergraduate Training Program, Attn: S232R (UTP), 9800 Savage Rd., Suite 6840, Ft. Meade, MD 20755-6840; 301-688-0400; {www.nsa.gov}.
back to top

Money For American Indians Who Need Extra Studies For Health Care Program
(Health Professions Preparatory Scholarship Program for Indians 93.971)
The program objective is to make scholarships available to American Indians and Alaskan Natives who need to take some extra courses in order to qualify for enrollment or re-enrollment in a health profession school. Money can be used for up to two years of scholarship support, and the funds can cover tuition, stipends, and books. Students must apply to the Indian Health Service Office for application information. Money available: $2,000,000. Grants range from $13,182 to $26,019. Contact Indian Health Service, Scholarship Program, 12300 Twinbrook Parkway, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20852; 301-443-6197; {www.ihs.gov}.
back to top

Scholarships For Health Care Professionals
(Health Professions Scholarship Program 93.972)
This program objective is to provide scholarships to American Indians and Alaskan natives attending health professions schools and who are interested in serving other Indians. Upon completion, scholarship recipients are obligated to serve in the Indian Health Service one year for each year of scholarship support, with a minimum of two years. The health professions needed are listed annually in the Federal Register. The money can be used to support a student completing a health profession degree. Money available: $7,300,000. Grants range from $12,136 to $38,222. Contact Indian Health Service, Scholarship Program, 12300 Twinbrook Parkway, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20852; 301-443-6197; {www.ihs.gov}.
back to top

Money For Dental Students For Advanced Residency Training
(Residency Training And Advanced Education in General Practice Of Dentistry 93.897)
The program objective is to assist schools of dentistry or dental training to institute residency training and advanced educational programs in the general practice of dentistry. The grant can be used to support personnel, residents or trainees who are in need of financial assistance, to purchase equipment, and for other expenses necessary to conduct the program. Money can be used to support a student while he or she completes a dental training program or residency. Students must apply to those institutions that have received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $3,500,000. Contact Public Health and Dental Education Branch, Division of Public Health and Allied Health, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-6880; {bhpr.hrsa.gov/dadphp/dadphp.htm}.
back to top

Health Careers Opportunity Program
(Health Careers Opportunity Program 93.822)
The Health Careers Opportunity Program provides assistance to individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds to obtain a health or allied health profession degree. Grants can be used to identify, recruit, and select individuals from minority and disadvantaged backgrounds for education and training in a health or allied health professions school; facilitate entry of eligible students into such schools; provide counseling or other services designed to assist such individuals in successfully completing their education and training; provide preliminary education for a period prior to entry into the regular course of health or allied health professions education, designed to assist students in successfully completing regular courses of education, or refer the appropriate individuals to institutions providing preliminary education; and provide disadvantaged students with information on financial aid resources. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $26,870,000. Contact Division of Disadvantaged Assistance, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Services, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Room 8A-09, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-2100; {bhpr.hrsa.gov/dhpd/hcopHome 1.htm}.
back to top

Grants for Native Hawaiian Students
(Native Hawaiian Higher Education Program 84.316)
Grants are give to provide full or partial fellowship support for Native Hawaiian students enrolled at two or four year degree granting institutions of higher education. Awards are based on academic potential and financial need. Full or partial support will also be given to support Native Hawaiian students enrolled at post-baccalaureate degree granting institutions. Priority will be given to providing fellowship support for professions that are underrepresented in the Native Hawaiians community. Money available: $2,700,000. For more information, contact Higher Education Programs, Office of Postsecondary Education, Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202; 202-502-7700; {www.ed.gov}.
back to top

Money For Nursing Students To Repay Their Loans
(Nursing Education Loan Repayment Agreements For Registered Nurses Entering Employment At Eligible Health Facilities 93.908)
As an incentive for registered nurses to enter into full time employment at health facilities with nursing shortages, this program assists in the repayment of their nursing education loans. The program is designed to increase the number of registered nurses serving designated nurse shortage areas. Nurses can use the money to pay off nursing student loans. An Applicant Information Bulletin For Registered Nurses is available at the address listed below. Money available: $2,183,000. Contact Loan Repayment Programs Branch, Division of Scholarships and Loan Repayment, Bureau of Primary Health Care, Health Resources and Services Administration, 4350 East-West Highway, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-594-4400; 800-435-6464; {bphc.hrsa.gov/bhpc/}.
back to top

Money For Health Professionals
Who Want To Be In Public Health
(Public Health Traineeships 93.964)
The program objective is to help support graduate students who are studying in the field of public health. Grants are given to colleges and universities offering graduate or specialized training in the public health field. Support is limited to the fields of biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental health, toxicology, public health nutrition, and maternal and child health. Money can be used to support a student completing a public health degree, and includes a stipend, tuition, and fees, and a transportation allowance. Students must apply to those institutions that have received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $2,326,000. Contact Division of Associated, Dental, and Public Health Professions, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, Parklawn Bldg., Room 8C-09, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-6041; {bhpr.hrsa.gov}.
back to top

Scholarships For National Health Service Corps
(National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program 93.288)
The program objective is to provide service-conditioned scholarships to health professions students to assure an adequate supply of physicians, dentists, certified nurse midwives, certified nurse practitioners, and physician assistants in Health Professional Shortage Areas. The scholarship pays for tuition and required fees, books, supplies, and equipment for the year, plus a monthly stipend to students ($935 per month), and a single annual payment to cover the cost of all other reasonable educational expenses. Each year of support incurs one year of service, with a two-year minimum service obligation required. Service sites are selected from those listed by the National Health Service Corps one year prior to service in federally designated Health Professional Shortage Areas. Money available: $30,066,400. Contact National Health Service Corps Scholarships, Division of Scholarships and Loan Repayments, Bureau of Primary Health Care, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 4350 East-West Hwy., 10th Floor, Bethesda, MD 20814; 301-594-4410; 800-638-0824; {www.bphc.hrsa.dhhs.gov/nhsc}.
back to top

$30,000 To Study The Humanities
(Promotion of the Humanities - Fellowships and Stipends 45.160)
Fellowships and Summer Stipends provide support for scholars to undertake full-time independent research and writing in the humanities. Grants are available for 6 to 12 month fellowships and two months of summer study. Projects may contribute to scholarly knowledge or to the general public's understanding of the humanities. The proposed study or research may be completed during the grant period or it may be part of a longer project. Contact the office listed below for application information. Money available: $6,100,000. Stipends are $4,000 for summer; $24,000 for 6-8 months; and $30,000 for 9-12 months. Contact Fellowships and Stipends, Division of Research and Education, National Endowment for the Humanities, Room 318, Washington, DC 20506; 202-606-8466; {www.neh.gov}.
back to top

Grants For Graduate Training In Family Medicine
(Grants For Graduate Training In Family Medicine 93.379)
The program objective is to increase the number of physicians practicing family medicine, particularly to those willing to work in medically under-served communities. Grants are available to cover the cost of developing and operating residency-training programs, and to provide financial assistance to participants in the programs. A grant may be made to a residency program in family practice; an internship program in osteopathic medicine which emphasizes family medicine; or a residency program in osteopathic general practice. Money can be used to support a student while he or she completes a residency or internship program. Residents must apply to those institutions that have received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $13,616,136. Contact Division of Medicine, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Room 9A27, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-1468; {bhpr.hrsa.gov/dm/MEDICINE.HTM}.
back to top

Money To Train To Be A Professional Nurse
(Professional Nurse Traineeships 93.358)
The program objective is to prepare individuals who have completed basic nursing preparation as nurse educators, public health nurses, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners, or as other clinical nursing specialists. Money can be used to support a student while they complete the professional nurse traineeships. Students must apply to those institutions that have received the program money. A fact sheet is available entitled Program Guide for Professional Nurse Traineeship Program. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $15,666,000. Students may receive stipends up to $8,800 plus tuition and other expenses. Contact Division of Nursing, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-5786; {bhpr.hrsa.gov/dr/dr.htm}.
back to top

Money For Job Safety and Health Training
(Occupational Safety and Health - Training Grants 93.263)
The program objective is to develop specialized professional and paraprofessional personnel in the occupational safety and health field with training in occupational medicine, occupational health nursing, industrial hygiene, and occupational safety. Money can be used to pay for long and short-term training and educational resource centers. Students must apply to those institutions that have received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $11,092,000. Contact National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1600 Clifton Rd., Atlanta, GA 30333; 404-639-3525; {www.cdc.gov/niosh}.
back to top

Money For Health Care Training In Rural Areas
(Interdisciplinary Training For Health Care For Rural Areas 93.192)
This program is designed to help fulfill the health care needs of people living in rural areas. Money is set aside to recruit and retain health care professionals in rural health care settings. Funds can be used for student stipends, postdoctoral fellowships, faculty training, and the purchase or rental of necessary transportation and telecommunication equipment. Money can be used to support health profession students while they complete their degree or training. Students must apply to those institutions that have received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $3,926,000. Contact Division of Associated, Dental and Public Health Professions, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Room 8C-26, Parklawn Building, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-6867; {bhpr.hrsa.gov/interdisciplinary/rural.html}.
back to top

Grants For Pediatric Training
(Pediatric Residency in Primary Care 93.181)
Hospitals and schools of pediatric medicine can receive money to support residency programs for primary care pediatric practice. Funds can be used to cover the development and establishment of Pediatric Primary Care Residency programs and to provide resident stipends for those planning to specialize in pediatric primary care. Money can be used to support a resident while he or she completes his or her pediatric primary care residency. Students must apply to those institutions that have received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $624,440. Contact Division of Medicine, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Room 8C-26, Parklawn Building, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-6880; {bhpr.hrsa.gov}.
back to top


Money For Disadvantaged Students To Study Nursing
(Nursing Education Opportunities For Individuals From Disadvantaged Backgrounds 93.178)
Schools of nursing can receive financial assistance to meet the costs of projects that increase nursing education opportunities for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. Money can be used for counseling, preliminary education of students, and to support a student while completing a nursing degree. Students must apply to those institutions that have received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $3,779,000. Contact Division of Nursing, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Services, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Room 8C-26, Parklawn Building, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-6880; {bhpr.hrsa.gov}.
back to top

Money To Repay Loans
(National Health Service Corps Loan Repayment 93.162)
The National Health Service Corps provides for the repayment of educational loans for health professionals who agree to serve in a health manpower shortage area. Priority is given to primary care physicians, dentists, certified nurse midwives, certified nurse practitioners, and physicians' assistants. Money can be used to repay student loans. The amount of money available per professional is up to $25,000 a year during the first two years of practice and $35,000 for each year after that. Health professionals also receive a very competitive salary and benefits package. Money available: $36,000,000. Contact National Health Service Corps Scholarships, Division of Scholarships and Loan Repayments, Bureau of Primary Health Care, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 4350 East-West Hwy., 10th Floor, Bethesda, MD 20814; 301-594-4410; 800-435-6464; {www.bphc.hrsa.dhhs.gov/nhsc}.
back to top

Money For Minorities Pursuing a Health Professions Education
(Programs of Excellence In Health Professions Education For Minorities 93.157)
The program helps health professions schools train minority health professionals. These funds can be used to recruit and retain faculty, improve the facilities and information resources, and improve student performance, student recruitment, and student research. Students must apply to those institutions that have received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $22,800,000. Contact Division of Disadvantaged Assistance, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Room 8A-09, Parklawn Building, 55600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-1348; {bhpr.hrsa.gov/dhpd/coeHome 1.htm}.
back to top

Get Your Loans Paid Through Indian Health Service
(Indian Health Service Loan Repayment Program 93.164)
To ensure that there are enough trained health professionals, the Indian Health Service provides for the repayment of loans to those professionals who agree to serve in an Indian Health Service Facility. Money can be used for the repayment of student loans. An application is available by contacting the office listed below. Money available: $11,233,900. The minimum period of participation is two years, and the maximum loan payment is $30,000 per year. Contact Indian Health Service, Loan Repayment Program, 12300 Twinbrook Parkway, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20852; 301-443-3369; {www.ihs.gov}.
back to top

Financial Assistance For Disadvantaged Health Professions Students
(Financial Assistance For Disadvantaged Health Professions Students 93.139)
Health profession students who are of exceptional financial need and are studying for a degree in medicine, osteopathic medicine, or dentistry can receive financial support. Money can be used to support a student while in school. Funds are awarded to accredited schools of medicine, osteopathic medicine, or dentistry. Students should apply to their school for these scholarships. Money available: $6,741,000. The maximum amount available per student is $18,000. Contact Division of Student Assistance, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Room 8-34, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-4776; {bhpr.hrsa.gov}.
back to top

Money To Train To Become A Nurse Anesthetist
(Nurse Anesthetist Traineeships 93.124)
Registered nurses can receive money to become nurse anesthetists through this program that provides funds for a maximum 18-month period of full-time study. Nurses must complete 12 months of study in a nurse anesthetist program. Money can be used to support a student while completing the training program. Students need to apply to those institutions that have received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Student stipend is usually $8,800 plus tuition and other expenses. Money available: $2,717,000. Contact Division of Nursing, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Room 9-36, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-6880; {bhpr.hrsa.gov}.
back to top

Money To Study Food
(Food and Agricultural Science National Needs Graduate Fellowship Grants 10.210)
The program awards grants to colleges and universities that have superior teaching and research competencies in the food and agricultural sciences. These grants are to be used to encourage outstanding students to pursue and complete a graduate degree in an area of the food and agricultural sciences for which there is a national need for development of scientific expertise. Money can be used to support a student completing a graduate, masters, or doctorate degree. Students must apply to those institutions that received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $2,910,000. Contact Grants Program Manager, Office of Higher Education Programs, CSREES, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Administrative Building, Room 338A, 14th and Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250; 202-720-7854; {www.reeusda.gov/serd/hep/ index.htm}.
back to top

Money To Help Math Students and Summer Scientists
(Independent Education and Science Projects and Programs 11.449)
This program objective is to increase the number of minority students enrolling in college and majoring in math, science and engineering. Another objective is to recruit scientists and engineers from the Boulder county area to serve as science/math tutors. Money can be used to help high school and middle school students who are part of the Math, Engineering, Science Achievement (MESA) Program in Colorado. It is also for students pursuing a course of study related to oceanic and atmospheric sciences and who are interested in a summer hands-on experience in a laboratory setting. Money can be used for transportation, housing and stipends for students during the summer months where students learn about the laboratories mission and perform hands-on assignments. Money available: $75,000. Contact Tony Tafoya, NOAA/Environmental Research Laboratories, R/Ex-4, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303; 303-497-6731; {www.etl.noaa.gov}.
back to top

Money To Study Community Planning and Development
(Community Development Work-Study Program 14.512)
The Community Development Work-Study Program makes grants to institutions of higher education to provide assistance to economically disadvantaged and minority students. Students take part in community development work-study programs while they are enrolled full-time in graduate or undergraduate programs with that major. Grants are given to encourage minority and economically disadvantaged students to develop careers in community and economic development, community planning, and community management. Related fields include public administration, urban management, and urban planning. Student assistance is in the form of work stipends, tuition support, and additional support to cover books and travel related to conferences and seminars. Students must apply to those institutions that received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $3,000,000. Average grant per student is $30,000. Contact U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Community Planning and Development, Office of University Partnerships, 451 7th St., SW, Room 8130, Washington, DC 20410; 202-708-1537, ext. 218; {www.hud.gov/progdesc/cdwsp.html}.
back to top

Money To Study Housing Issues
(Doctoral Dissertation Research Grant Program)
The program objective is to encourage doctoral candidates to engage in policy related housing and urban development research and to assist them in its timely completion. Money can used to support Ph.D candidates while they complete work towards their degree. Students must have a fully developed and approved dissertation proposal that addresses the purpose of this program. Students can request an application package from the address listed below or by calling HUD USER at 800-245-2691. Each student is eligible for up to $15,000 per year. Contact Division of Budget, Contracts, and Program Control, Office of Policy Development and Research, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th St., SW, Room 8230, Washington, DC 20410; 202-708-0544; {www.huduser.org}.
back to top

Money For Members Of Indian Tribes To Go To College
(Indian Education-Higher Education Grant Program 15.114)
The program objective is to provide financial aid to eligible Indian students to enable them to attend accredited institutions of higher education. Members of an Indian tribe may be eligible for these grants to supplement the total financial aid package prepared by their college financial aid officer. Once you have been accepted by a college and have completed their financial aid application, you may request a grant application form from your tribal group. Money available: $20,290,000. The amount of assistance per student ranges from $300-$5000 per year. Contact Bureau of Indian Affairs, Office of Indian Education Programs, Code 522, Room S 3512-MIB, U.S. Department of the Interior, 1849 C St., NW, Washington, DC 20240; 202-208-3478; {www.oiep.bia.edu}.
back to top

Money To Study The Break Up Of The USSR
(Russian, Eurasian, and East European Research and Training 19.300)
The program is designed to sustain and strengthen American expertise on the Commonwealth of Independent States, Georgia, the Baltic countries, and countries of Eastern Europe by supporting graduate training; advanced research; public dissemination of research data, methods, and findings; contact and collaboration among government and private specialists; and first hand experience of the (former) Soviet Union and Eastern European countries by American specialists, including on site conduct of advanced training and research. Graduate students interested in conducting research on the Commonwealth of Independent States, Georgia, the Baltic countries, and the countries of Eastern Europe can receive fellowships which can support a student while conducting research or training. Funds are given to nonprofit organizations and institutions of higher learning who act as intermediaries for the federal funds by conducting their own competitions to make the awards. Grants in the past include grants for onsite independent short term research; individual exchange fellowships for American graduate students to pursue research in the region; and advanced in-country language training fellowships in Russian, Ukrainian, Hungarian, Polish, and more. Students must apply to those institutions that received the money. For a listing of institutions that received money contact the office listed below. Money available: $4,800,000. Contact Eurasian and East European Research and Training Program, INR/RES, U.S. Department of State, 2201 C St., NW, Room 6841, Washington, DC 20520; 202-736-4851; {www.state.gov}.
back to top

Money For Criminal Justice Majors
(Criminal Justice Research and Development - Grant Research Fellowships 16.562)
The program objective is to improve the quality and quantity of knowledge about crime and the criminal justice system. Additionally, the program seeks to increase the number of persons who are qualified to teach in collegiate criminal justice programs, to conduct research related to criminal justice issues, and to perform more effectively within the criminal justice system. Students can receive a fellowship for a year, plus, two to three months to visit the National Institute of Justice to work with staff as an intern. This competitive program provides fellowship stipends, major project costs and certain university fees, round trip travel expenses to the Institute, and housing costs. Detailed information can be received by requesting the NIJ Research Plan from the National Criminal Justice Reference Service, Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20850; 800-851-3420. Money available: $150,000. Maximum grant per student $15,000. Contact National Institute of Justice, 633 Indiana Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20531; 202-307-2942; {www.ncjrs.org}.
back to top

$3,000 A Year To Be A Merchant Marine
(State Marine Schools 20.806)
The program objective is to train merchant marine officers in State Marine Schools. You can receive $3,000 per year to train to be a merchant marine officer at a designated State Marine School. In exchange for this incentive payment program, you must commit yourself to a minimum of five years duty to the Maritime Administration, which can be satisfied by: serving as a merchant marine officer aboard vessels; as an employee in a U.S. maritime related industry, profession or marine science; or as a commissioned officer on active duty in an armed force of the U.S. or in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. You must also remain in a reserve unit of an armed force for a minimum of eight years.Students need to apply to one of the State Marine Schools. Money available: $6,750,000. Contact Office of Maritime Labor and Training, Maritime Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 400 7th St., SW, Washington, DC 20590; 202-366-5755; {www.marad.dot.gov}.
back to top

All Expenses Plus $558 A Month To Be A Merchant Marine
This program trains merchant marine officers while they attend the Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, NY. Students receive training, subsistence, books, quarters, uniforms, medical care, and program travel without cost. In addition, the student will receive a monthly wage from their steamship company employer. Money available: $33,250,000. An allowance is prescribed for all personnel for uniforms and textbooks. During the sea year a midshipman will earn $558.04 per month from the steamship employer. Contact Office of Maritime Labor and Training, Maritime Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 400 Seventh St., SW, Washington, DC 20590; 202-366-5755; {www.marad.dot.gov}.
back to top

Money For Social, Behavioral, And Economic Sciences Students
(Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences 47.075)
The program objective is to promote the progress of the social, behavioral, and economic science; to facilitate cooperative research activities with foreign scientists, engineers, and institutions and to support understanding of the resources invested in science and engineering in the U.S. Funds are provided for U.S. scientists and engineers to carry out studies abroad, to conduct research, to engage in joint research projects with foreign counterpart organizations, and to support international scientific workshops in the U.S. and abroad. Money can be used for paying associated costs necessary to conduct research or studies for doctorate students; and more. Students must contact the office listed below for application information. Money available: $150,260,000. Contact Assistant Director, Social, Behavioral, and Economic Research, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230; 703-306-1710; {www.nsf.gov}.
back to top

Money For Disabled Veterans To Go To College
(Vocational Rehabilitation For Disabled Veterans 64.116)
The program objective is to provide all services and assistance necessary to enable service-disabled veterans and service persons hospitalized pending discharge to achieve maximum independence in daily living and, to the maximum extent possible, to become employable and to obtain and maintain suitable employment. The fund provides for the entire cost of tuition, books, fees, supplies, and other services to help the veteran live with a reduced dependency on others while staying in their Home s and communities. The veteran also receives a monthly allowance, a work-study allowance, and more. Enrollment can be in a trade, business, or technical schools, colleges, apprenticeship programs, cooperative farming, special rehabilitation facilities, or at Home when necessary. Students must obtain an application from any Veterans Affairs office or regional office. Money available: Direct payments: $402,907,0000; Loan advances: $2,401,000. Monthly full time allowances per student range from $413 for a single veteran to $604 for a veteran with two dependents, plus $44 for each dependent in excess of two. Contact Department of Veterans Affairs, Central Office, Washington, DC 20420; 800-827-1000; {www.va.gov}.
back to top

Money For Spouses And Children Of Deceased Or Disabled Veterans To Go To School
(Survivors and Dependents Educational Assistance 64.117)
The program provides partial support to those seeking to advance their education who are qualifying spouses, surviving spouses, or children of deceased or disabled veterans who, as a result of their military service, have a permanent and total (100 percent) service connected disability, or a service personnel who have been listed for a total of more than 90 days as currently Missing in Action, or as Prisoners of War. Spouse, surviving spouse, or child of a deceased or disabled veteran can receive monthly payments to be used for tuition, books, subsistence, for courses, training, or college. Financial assistance is $485 per month, and there is tutorial assistance, vocational counseling and testing, and a work-study allowance. Benefits may be awarded for pursuit of associate, bachelor, or graduate degrees at colleges and universities, as well as study at business, technical, or vocational schools. Information on the program and application forms are available from your local or regional Veterans Affairs office. Money available: $108,530,000. Contact Department of Veterans Affairs, Central Office, Washington, DC 20420; 800-827-1000; {www.va.gov}.
back to top

Money For Vietnam Veterans To Go To School
(Post-Vietnam Era Veterans' Educational Assistance 64.120)
Post-Vietnam veterans who entered the Armed Services between 1977 and 1985 may be eligible for funds to obtain a college degree or vocational training. Through this program, the government matches $2 for every $1 the serviceman contributes. Some contribution to the fund must have been made prior to April 1, 1987. Contact your local or regional Veterans Affairs office for additional information or application materials. Money available: $54,614,000. Up to a maximum of $8,100 of basic benefits is available per student, as well as a work-study allowance of minimum wage and tutorial assistance up to a maximum of $1,200. Contact Department of Veterans Affairs, Central Office, Washington, DC 20420; 800-827-1000; {www.va.gov}.
back to top

Money For Retired Veterans To Go To School
(All-Volunteer Force Educational Assistance 64.124)
This program helps servicemen readjust to civilian life after their separation from military service, assists in the recruitment and retention of highly qualified personnel in the active and reserve components in the Armed Forces, and extends the benefits of a higher education to those who may not otherwise be able to afford it. Honorably discharged veterans can take advantage of the Montgomery GI Bill Active Duty benefits, which provides funds to pursue professional or vocational education, and even covers correspondence courses. Veterans can receive a monthly stipend while attending school, with the amount varying depending upon date of entry into the service and length of service. Additional information and application materials are available through any regional Veterans Affairs office. Money available: $816,798,000. A maximum allowance of $19,008 as basic assistance is available per student, as well as a work-study allowance, and up to $1,200 in tutorial assistance. Contact Department of Veterans Affairs, Central Office, Washington, DC 20420; 800-827-1000; {www.va.gov}.
back to top

Volunteer And Earn Money To Pay For School
(AmeriCorps 94.006)
AmeriCorps is an initiative designed to achieve direct results in addressing the nation's critical education, human, public safety, and environmental needs at the community level. The program provides meaningful opportunities for people to serve their country in organized efforts, fostering citizen responsibility, building their community, and providing education opportunities for those who make a serious commitment to service. Stipends can be used to support the person while they volunteer. Health care and childcare benefits may also be provided. Participants will also receive an education award, which may be used to pay for higher education or for vocational training, and may also be used to repay any existing student loans. Contact the Corporation for National Service to locate programs in your area or to apply for programs at the national level. Money available: $256,816,000. Contact Corporation for National Service, 1201 New York Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20525 202-606-5000, ext. 474; {www.americorps.org}.
back to top

Money To Study The Drug Abuse Field
(Drug Abuse National Research Service Awards for Research Training 93.278)
Individual grants are made to fellows seeking predoctoral or postdoctoral support for full time research training in the drug abuse field. It can be used to cover tuition fees, and more. Postdoctoral researchers are obligated to pay back their first year of support through a period of research and/or teaching activities. Predoctoral stipends are $14,688 and postdoctoral awards range from $26,256 to $41,268. Money available: $15,600,000. Contact National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Neurosciences Building, 6001 Exeutive Blvd., Bethesda, MD 20892; 301-443-6710; {www.nih.gov}.
back to top

Fellowships for Creative Writers and Translators
(Promotion of the Arts-Grants to Organizations and Individuals 45.024)
The National Endowment for the Arts provides grants to support Literature Fellowships, Fellowships for Creative Writers, Fellowships awarded to writers of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction to allow them to devote time to writing, research, travel, and to advance their writing careers. Money available: $830,000. Fellowships are usually $20,000. For more information, contact National Endowment for the Arts, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20506; 202-682-5400; {arts.gov}.
back to top

Scholarships for Minorities
(Higher Education Multicultural Scholars Program 10.220)
This program is designed to increase the ethnic and cultural diversity of the food and agricultural scientific and professional work force, and to advance the educational achievement of minority Americans. Money is given to colleges and universities that have a demonstrable capacity to attract, educate, and graduate minority students for careers as agriscience and agribusiness professionals. Funds can be used to support full-time undergraduate students pursuing a baccalaureate degree in an area of food and agricultural sciences. Money available: $1,920,000. Contact Grants Programs Manager, Education Programs, SCREES, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Room 3912, South Building, Washington, DC 20250; 202-720-7854; {www.reeusda.gov}.
back to top

College Scholarship for Survivors of Victims of Terrorist Attacks
A $3 million "Families for Freedom" Scholarship has been created by Indianapolis based Lumina Foundation for Education to aid undergraduate education of financially needy survivors (spouses and children) of those who perished or were disabled in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. This includes families of airplane crew and passengers, World Trade Center and Pentagon workers and visitors and relief workers. This program will extend to currently enrolled undergraduate students as well as future students. Assistance is planned to begin as early as January 2002. These scholarships are being offered in partnership with the Citizens Scholarship Foundation of America, which will take applications and donations and manage the money. To inquire about eligibility or apply for assistance from this fund, call 1-800-537-4180 and ask for the "Families for Freedom Scholarship Fund" program manager or contact Citizens' Scholarship Foundation of America, 7703 Normandale Road #110, Minneapolis, MN 55435; 877-862-0136; {familiesoffreedom@csfa.org}; {www.csfa.org/familiesoffreedom/pressrelease.html}.
back to top

Scholarships for Surviving Children of Pentagon Attack
The Marine Corps-Law Enforcement Foundation has pledged $10,000 in scholarship bonds for children whose parents were killed in the terrorist attack on the Pentagon. In the past, this organization has provided eligible mentally or physically disabled children of a Marine family financial aid for medical equipment or tutoring that is not covered by their family's insurance. Scholarship bonds have been granted to children of active duty Marine or Federal law enforcement personnel who were killed in active duty. As this is a new program, contact the Foundation directly for information and applications. Contact The Marine Corps-Law Enforcement Foundation, P.O. Box 37, Mountain Lakes, NJ 07046; 877-606-1775; Fax: 973-625-9239; {info@mc-lef.org}; {www.mc-lef.org}.
back to top

Education For Dependents of Public Safety Officers Killed or Disabled in The Line of Duty
The Bureau of Justice Assistance provides financial assistance for higher education to the spouses and children (under the age of 27) of public safety officers* who have been killed or have received permanent and totally disabling injuries in the line of duty after October 1997. Assistance ranges from $202 for per month for half-time students to $404 per month for full-time students. *Public safety officer is a person serving a public agency in an official capacity, with, or without compensation, as a law enforcement officer, firefighter, or member of a public rescue squad or ambulance crew. Contact Bureau of Justice Assistance, Fourth Floor , 810 7 Street, NW, Washington, DC 20531; 202-514-6278; 800-421-6770; {www.usdoj.gov}.
back to top

Free College Education for Children and Spouses of Disaster Victims
Governor George E. Pataki has announced he will submit "World Trade Center Memorial Scholarship" legislation, guaranteeing a college education to all of the families of those killed or seriously and permanently disabled in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the attack on the Pentagon, and the crash of United Flight 93 in Pennsylvania, as well as to the families of fallen police officers, firefighters, and Emergency Medical Services workers who were killed in the terrorist attacks or in the ongoing rescue and recovery efforts. Those who would be eligible for the scholarship benefits include families of victims who lived out-of-state and those who were residents of other countries. Under the proposal, the State of New York would pay the cost of attendance at any State University of New York or City University of New York institution for the children and spouses of victims, or provide them an equivalent amount to attend a private college or university located in New York State. The Governor's proposal would cover the cost of items such as tuition, room and board, fees, books, supplies and transportation. The benefit would be available for four years of full-time undergraduate study (or five years for certain five year baccalaureate programs), would become effective immediately, and be in effect for the current 2001-02 academic year. Contact New York State Higher Education Services Corporation, 99 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12255; 888-697-4372; 518-473-1574; {E-Mail: webmail@hesc.com}; {www.state.ny.us/governor/press/year01/sept18_01.htm}.
back to top

Free Computers and Technology Training
The National Cristina Foundation provides free computer technology and equipment to people with disabilities, students at risk and economically disadvantaged. The goal of this organization is to ensure that used computer technology resources that no longer meet an enterprise's needs are reconditioned and distributed as a tool for developing human potential. Contact National Cristina Foundation, 500 West Putnam, Greenwich, CT 06830; 203-863-9100; {Email: ncl@cristina.org}; {www.cristina.org}.
back to top

Scholarship Money for Children of Firefighters Killed in the Line of Duty
The W. H. "Howie" McClennan scholarship provides a $2,500 scholarship to sons, daughters or legally adopted children of fire fighters killed in the line of duty planning to attend a university, accredited college or other institution of higher learning. Awards are based on financial need and academic achievement. Scholarship Rules and Regulations can be downloaded from the following website: {www.iaff.org/academy/pdfs/SchMcClenRules.pdf}. Contact W. H. "Howie" McClennan Scholarship, Office of the General President, The International Association of Fire Fighters, 1750 New York Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006; {www.iaff.org/academy/scholarships/mcclennan.html}.
back to top

College Scholarship Funds for Deaf & Blind Students
The Helen Keller Scholarship Fund for the Deaf and Blind, is funded by the American Foundation for the Blind and awards $1,000 to $3,000 annually to legally blind or deaf citizens of the United States. Assistance may be used to help pay for college-related costs and equipment. Contact American Foundation for the Blind, 11 Penn Plaza
Suite 300, New York, NY, 10001; Sheron Pierce, Special Projects Administrator; 800-232-5463; 212-502-7662 (TTY).
back to top

Connecticut Education Programs
Department of Higher Education, 61 Woodland St., Hartford, CT 06105-2391, 860-566-8118, www.ctdhe.org
General requirements: Applicants must be Connecticut residents for in state and out-of-state schools programs. Money available: $19,697,418.
Programs Available:
$2,000 A Year If You Are In Top 20% Of Your High School Class (Scholastic Achievement Grant)
$8,548 A Year To Attend A Private College (Connecticut Independent College Student Grant)
Money For Students Who Need Help Paying Tuition At A Public University (Connecticut Aid for Public College Students)
Money To Dependents Of Deceased, Disabled, Or MIA Veterans (Aid to Dependents of Deceased, Disabled, or MIA Veterans)
Free Tuition To Veterans (Tuition Waiver for Veterans)
$3,000 to Study Information Technology (CT Information Technology Scholarship)
$5,000 For Minority Students To Become Teachers (CT Minority Teacher Incentive Program)
back to top

District of Columbia Education Programs
Office of Postsecondary Education, 2100 Martin Luther King, Jr., Ave., SE, Suite 401, Washington, DC 20020, 202-698-2400, www.dhs.washinton.dc.us
General requirements: Applicants must be District of Columbia residents for in-state or out-of-state school programs. Money available: $703,033.
Programs Available:
Money For College Anywhere (D.C. State Student Incentive Program)
D.C. State Student Incentive Program, $700 per student for the academic year. Applications available: March 1.
back to top

Maryland Education Programs
Maryland Higher Education Commission, State Scholarship Administration, The Jeffrey Building, 16 Francis Street, Suite 209, Annapolis, MD 21401-1781, 410-974-5370, Fax: 410-974-5994 www.mhec.state.md.us
General requirements: Applicants must be Maryland residents, unless specified for in-state or out-of-state schools. Money available: $26,000,000.
Programs Available:
$1,000 To Study computers or engineering (Maryland Science and Technology Scholarship)
$2,000 To Become a Teacher (Maryland Teacher Scholarship)
$3,000 To Transfer From A Community College To A 4-Year School (Maryland Community College Transfer Student Scholarship)
$3,000 For Moderate Income Students to Attend College (Educational Assistance Grant)
$1,000 To Attend School Part Time (Part Time Grant Program)
$8,400 For Low Income Students To Attend College (Guaranteed Access Grant)
$2,000 To Full- Or Part-Time Students (Senatorial Scholarship Program)
$200 To Full-Time Or Part-Time Students (House of Delegate Award)
$1,500 To Take A Vocational Education Course (Tolbert Grant)
$3,000 A Year For Smart Students (Distinguished Scholar Program)
$4,800 To Get A Degree In Nursing (Maryland State Nursing Scholarship)
$3,000 A Year To Become A Teacher In Maryland (Teacher Education Distinguished Scholar Program)
Grants To Dependents Of POW's, Fire Fighters, Police Officers, and Safety Personnel Killed Or Disabled In The Line Of Duty (Edward Conroy Grant)
Grants To Study Physical Therapy (Physical and Occupational Therapists and Assistants Scholarships)
$7,500 A Year To Study Family Practice Medicine (Family Practice Medical Scholarship)
Grants To Study Law, Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing Or Pharmacy (Professional Scholarship)
Tuition, Fees, Room and Board To Become A Teacher (Sharon Christa McAuliffe Critical Shortage Teacher Scholarship)
$2,000 To Study Child Care, Full or Part Time (Child Care Provider Scholarship)
Free Tuition To Fire Fighters and Rescue Squad Members Who Want To Study Full Or Part Time (Reimbursement of Fire Fighters and Rescue Squad Members)
Student Loans If You Work For A Non-Profit (Loan Assistance Repayment Program (LARP))
back to top

Pennsylvania Education Programs
Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency, 1200 N. 7th Street, Harrisburg, PA 17102, 800-692-7392
General requirements: Applicants must be Pennsylvania residents for in-state schools, unless otherwise specified. Money available: $233,000,000.
Programs Available:
$3,300 For Financially Needy Students (Pennsylvania State Grants)
$3,300 To Veterans (Grants for Veterans)
100% Of Tuition, Fees, Room and Board for Children of PA Police Officers, Firefighters, Rescue and Ambulance Squad Members, Correction Employees, and National Guard Members Who Died in Line Of Duty
$1,000 To Study Technology (Technology Scholarship)
$3,000 To Study Science and Technology (SciTech Scholarship)
back to top

Virginia Education Programs
Virginia State Council of Higher Education, Office of Financial Aid, James Monroe Building, 101 North 14th St., 10th Floor, Richmond, VA 23219, 804-225-2614, Fax: 804-225-2604, www.schev.edu/schevHome .html
General requirements: Applicants must be Virginia residents. Money available: Over $73,600,000.
Programs Available:
$5,000 For Students In Financial Need (Virginia College Assistance Program (CSAP))
Grants For Students Even Though They Don't NEED The Money (Virginia Tuition Assistance Grant Program (TAGP))
Free Tuition For Minority Students To Attend Traditionally White Colleges (Virginia Transfer Grant Program (VTGP))
Grants To Black Undergraduate Students (Last Dollar Program)
Nursing Students Receive $100 A Month For Every Month They Agree To Work In Virginia (Nursing Scholarship Program)
Money For Medical Students Who Agree To Work In Virginia (Medical Scholarship Program)
$5,000 To Dental Students Who Agree To Work In Small Virginia Towns (Rural Dental Scholarships)
$3,720 A Year For Teaching Students For Every Year They Agree To Work In Virginia (Virginia Teaching Scholarship)
Free Tuition, Fees, And Room and Board For State Cadets
(State Cadetships)
Free Tuition For Dependents Of Deceased Or Disabled Veterans (Virginia War Orphan Education Act)
Free Tuition And Fees For Students Who Want To Study Soil Science (Soil Scientist Program)
Free Tuition For Students Over 60 (Senior Citizens Tuition Waiver)
back to top

Government to Reduce Victims' College Loans
People affected by the September 11 terrorist attacks will be able to postpone or reduce payments of federal college loans under an agreement between banks and the U.S. Department of Education. The loan relief covers borrowers in three programs: Federal Family Education Loans, Federal Perkins Loan Programs and the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan. For more information call 1-800-433-3243. Borrowers must contact their lender to request this "forbearance." Contact Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20202; 800-872-5327; {E-Mail: customerservice@inet.ed.gov}; {www.ed.gov}.
back to top

$10,322.00 To Train For A New Career in Connecticut
Free entrepreneur training may be available while you collect unemployment benefits. Maximum payments are $397 per week. To see if you qualify contact the office below or one of the other one-stop centers that offer training to fill out an application. There are 3 steps after the applying. 1: Core Services (registration for job search) 2: Intensive Services (basic education skill testing) 3: Assessment for Training. If you are enable to obtain a job throughout the Core Services your counselor may be able to approve you for entrepreneur training. Training grant amount will be discussed with a career counselor. Check on line at the website given below as you may be able to qualify for services on line. Once you qualify for training you may be eligible for extra money to pay for transportation. Ask your career counselor for details.
1) Danbury Connecticut Works, 152 West St, Danbury, CT 06810; 203-731-2929; Fax: 203-731-2854; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
2) Manchester Connecticut Works, 587 E. Middle Turnpike, Manchester, CT 06040; 860-649-4558; Fax: 860-643-3015; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
3) Hartford Connecticut Works, 3580 Main St., Hartford, CT 06120; 860-566-5727; Fax: 860-566-8417; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
4) Hamden Connecticut Works, 37 Marne St., Hamden, CT 06514; 203-230-4939; Fax: 203-288-0788; 203-789-6867; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
5) New Haven Connecticut Works, 560 Ella T. Grasso Blvd., Bldg. 3, New Haven, CT 06519; 203-624-1493; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
6) Willimantic Connecticut Works, Nancey Powell, Manager, 1320 Main St., Tyler Square, Willimantic, CT 06226; 860-465-2120; Fax: 860-450-7527; {nancey.powell@po.state.ct.us}; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
7) Waterbury Connecticut Works, 249 Thomaston Ave., Waterbury, CT 06702; 203-596-4140; Fax: 203-596-4133; {dol.waterbury@po.state.ct.us}; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
8) Meriden Connecticut Works, 290 Pratt St, Meriden, CT 06450; 203-238-6148; Fax: 203-238-6696; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
9) Enfield Connecticut Works, 620 Enfield St., Enfield, CT 06082; 860-741-7295; Fax: 860-741-4290; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
10) Stamford Connecticut Works, 1340 Washington Blvd., Stamford, CT 06902; 203-425-2439; Fax: 203-348-4531; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
11) Bristol Connecticut Works, 55 South Street, Bristol, CT 06011; 860-314-2592; Fax: 860-584-4798; {dol.bristol@po.state.ct.us}; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
12) Bridgeport Connecticut Works, 2 Lafayette Square, Bridgeport, CT 06604; 203-330-4830; 203-579-606; Fax: 203-330-4835; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
13) Ansonia Connecticut Works, 555 Main St., Ansonia, CT 06401; 203-736-1059; Fax: 203-734-0030; {dol.ansonia@po.state.ct.us}; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
14) Norwich Connecticut Works, 113 Salem Turnpike, Suite 200, Norwich, CT 06360; 860-443-2041; Fax: 860-859-5618; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
15) New London Connecticut Works, Shaws Cove Six, New London, CT 06320; 860-447-6211;Fax: 860-447-6218; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
16) New Britain Connecticut Works, 260 Lafayett St., New Britain, CT 06053; 860-827-4460; Fax: 860-827-7065; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
17) Middletown Connecticut Works, 645 South Main St., Middletown, CT 06457; 860-344-2993; Fax: 860-344-2106; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
18) Torrington Connecticut Works, 486 Winsted Rd., Torrington, CT 06790; 860-626-6220; Fax: 860-626-6223; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
19) Danielson Connecticut Works, 95 Westcott Rd., Danielson, CT 06239; 860-779-5850; Fax: 203-779-5853; {www.ctdol.state.ct.us}.
back to top

$16,034.00 To Train For A New Career in DC

Free entrepreneur training may be available while you collect unemployment benefits. Maximum payments are $309 per week. To see if you qualify contact the office below or one of the other one-stop centers that offer training to fill out an application. There are 3 steps after the applying. 1: Core Services (registration for job search); 2: Intensive Services (basic education skill testing); 3: Assessment for Training. If you are enable to obtain a job throughout the Core Services your counselor may be able to approve you for entrepreneur training. Training must not exceed $8,000. Once you qualify for training you may be eligible for extra money to pay for transportation. Ask your career counselor for details.
1) D.C. Employment Service Center, Kenneth Lillard, Program Manager, 401 M St. SW, Suite 1, Washington, DC 20001; 202-727-0124; Fax: 202- 727-0217; {http://does.ci.washington.dc.us}.
2) D.C. Employment Services Center, Sylvia Moody, Program Manager, 800 North Capital St., NW, Suite 640, Washington, DC 20001; 202- 565-0001; Fax: 202- 565-9873 {http://does.ci.washington.dc.us}.
3) DC Employment Services Center, Ms. Glory Mitchell, Assistant Program Manager, Naylor Rd. One-Stop Career Center, 2626 Naylor Rd., Washington, DC 20001; 202-645-3535; Fax: 202-645-5246; {http://does.ci.washington.dc.us}.
back to top

Up To $14,280.00 To Train For A New Career in Maryland
Free entrepreneur training may be available while you collect unemployment benefits. Maximum payments are $280 per week. To see if you qualify contact the office below or one of the other one-stop centers that offer training to fill out an application. There are 3 steps after the applying. 1: Core Services (registration for job search); 2: Intensive Services (basic education skill testing); 3: Assessment for Training. If you are enable to obtain a job throughout the Core Services your counselor may be able to approve you for entrepreneur training. Once you qualify for training you may be eligible for extra money to pay for transportation. Ask your career counselor for details.
1) Maryland Job Service Division, Bonnie Gann, JTA Director, 7430 Executive Way, Suite U, Frederick, MD 21704; 301- 846-2255; Fax: 301- 637-2390; {bonnie_gann@co.frederick.md.us}; {www.co.frederick.md.us/govt./jta}; {www.careernet.state.md.us}.
2) Job Link Express, Owen Harrod, Program Manager, Prince Frederick Job Service, 200 Duke Street, Suite 2201, Prince Frederick, MD 20678; 410- 535-8815; Fax: 301- 855-1961; {oharrod@careernet.state.md.us}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/calvert.htm}.
3) Mont. Co. Transition Center, Eric Myren, President, Wheaton Transition Center, 11160 Viers Mill Rd., Wheaton, MD 20902; 301-929-6880; Fax: 301-933-4424; {emyren@montgomeryworks.com}; {www.montgomeryworks.com}.
4) Maryland Job Service Division, Darlene Steward, Supervisor, 201 S. Arlington Ave., Near B&0 Railroad Museum, Baltimore, MD 21223; 410- 396-3670; Fax: 410- 545-6075; {dstewart@oedworks.com}; {www.oedworks.com}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/baltocit}.
5) Maryland Job Services Division, Michael Wells, Supervisor, 2404 Liberty Heights Ave., Mondawmin Mall, Suite 302, Baltimore, MD 21215; 410- 523-1060; Fax: 410-728-8552; {wellsm@mailcity.com}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/baltocount.htm}.
6) Maryland Job Service Division, Sharon Queen, Acting Manager, Eastside Career Center, 3001 E. Madison Ave., Baltimore, MD 21205; 410- 396-9030; Fax: 410- 396-4063; {squeen@careernet.state.md.us}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/baltocity.htm}.
7) Maryland Job Service Division, Arlene Butler, Supervisor, Leonardtown Job Service, 23110 Leonard Hall Dr., Leonardtown, MD 20650; 301- 475-8300; Fax: 410- 475-4106; {abutler@careernet.state.md.us}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/st.mary.htm}.
8) Maryland Job Service Division, Denise Beaver, Manager, Employment and Training Programs, 224 N. Center Street, Westminster, MD 21157; 410- 386-2820; Fax: 410- 876-2977; {berc@carr.org}; {www.carr.org/berc}; {www.careernet.state.md.us}.
9) Maryland Job Service Division, George Balog, Supervisor, 103 Chesapeake Blvd., Upper Chesapeake Corp. Center, Elkton, MD 21921; 410- 996-0550,0551; Fax: 410- 996-0555; {gbalog@careernet.state.md.us}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/cecil.htm}.
10) Maryland Job Service Division, Ken Fletcher, Coordinator, Baltimore Works, 1100 Eutaw Street Rm.101, Baltimore, MD 21201; 410- 767-2133; Fax: 410- 333-7858; {kfletcher@careernet.state.md.us}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/baltocity.htm}; {www.oedworks.com}.
11) Maryland Job Service Division, Levon Roane, Director, Job Link Express (JLE), Waldorf, MD 20602, 175 Post Office Rd.; 301- 645-8720; Fax: 301- 645-8713; {lroane@careernet.state.md.us}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/charles.htm}.
12) Maryland Job Service Division, Stephen Gallison, Director, Maryland Professional Outplacement Assistance Cnt., 7060 Oakland Mills RD., Columbia, MD 21046; 410- 312-5090; Fax: 410- 312-5091; {sgallison@careernet.state.md.us};{www.careernet.state.md.us/poac/poac.htm}.
13) Maryland Job Service Division, Saundra Kelley ext. 302, Manager, Business and Workforce Development Cnt., 877 Baltimore/Annapolis Blvd. Suite 305, Severna Park, MD 21146; 410- 315-9680; Fax: 410- 315-8664; {info@bwdc.org}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/annearund.htm}.
14) Maryland Job Services Division, Dan McDermott, Executive Director, Chesapeake College, P.O. Box 8, Wye Mills, MD 21679; 410- 822-1716; Fax: 410- 827-5874; {dmcdermott@cheapeake.edu}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/queenannes.htm}.
15) Maryland Job Service Division, Joan Groce, Acting Supervisor, Kent County Careernet Center, 126 Philosopher Terrance, Chestertown, MD 21620; 410- 778-3525; Fax: 410- 778-3527; {jgroce@careernet.state.md.us}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/kent.htm}.
16) Labor Licensing and Regulations/ Employment, Susan Bass, Executive Assistant, 1100 Eutaw Street, Rm. 501, Baltimore, MD 21201; 410- 767-2468; Fax: 410- 767-2739; {sbass@dllr.state.md.us}; {www.dllr.state.md.us}.
17) Maryland Job Services, Greg Eberts, Supervisor, 201 Baptist Street, Rm. 2184, Salisbury, MD 21801; 410- 334-6888; Fax: 410- 334-3454; {geberts@careernet.state.md.us}; {www.careernet.state.md.us}.
18) Maryland Job Service Division, Becky Cathell, Job Service Supervisor, Berlin Job Service, 124 Main Street, Suite C, Berlin, MD 21811; 410- 629-1445; Fax: 410- 629-1963; {worcester@careernet.state.md.us}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/worcester.htm}.
19) Maryland Job Service Division, Robin Walker, WIA Training Counselor, Chrisfield Job Service, 930 West Main St., Chrisfield, MD 21817; 410- 968-0440; Fax: 410- 968-2149; {somerset@careernet.state.md}; {www.lowershore.org}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/somers}.
20) Baltimore County Office of Employment and Training, Careernet Center, William Burnum, Manager/Counselor, Careernet Center, 27 Mellor Avenue, Cantonsville, MD 21228; 410- 887-0940; Fax: 410- 887-1034; {www.careernet.state.md.us}.
21) Baltimore County Reemployment Assistance Center, Ellen Asplen, Director, Dulaney Center II, 901 Dulaney Valley Rd. Suite 100, Towson, MD 21204; 410- 887-4400; Fax: 410- 887-4401; {easplen@careernet.state.md.us}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/baltocounty.htm}.
22) Maryland Job Service Division, John Pyle, Director, Dorchester Career Center, 627 Race Street, Cambridge, MD 21613; 410- 901-4250; Fax: 410- 221-1817; {jpyle@careernet.state.md.us}; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/dorchester.htm}.
23) Western Maryland Consortium, Paul Smith, Supervisor, Western Maryland Consortium, 3-33 Pershing St. Rm.308, Cumberland, MD 21502; 410 777-1221; Fax: 410- 777-1639; {www.careernet.state.md.us/county/allenany.htm}.
back to top

$10,140.00 To Train For A New Career in New Jersey
Free entrepreneur training may be available while you collect unemployment benefits. Maximum payments are $390 per week. To see if you qualify contact the office below or one of the other one-stop centers that offer training to fill out an application. There are 3 steps after the applying. 1: Core Services (registration for job search) 2: Intensive Services (basic education skill testing) 3: Assessment for Training. If you are enable to obtain a job throughout the Core Services your counselor may be able to approve you for entrepreneur training. Training grant amount will be discussed with a career counselor. Check on line at the website given below you may be able to qualify for services on line. Once you qualify for training you may be eligible for extra money to pay for transportation, and other assistance to help you become successful. Ask your career counselor for details.
1) Paterson Employment Service Office, Roy Davis, Acting Manager, 370 Broadway, 2nd Floor, Paterson, NJ 07501; 973-977-4350; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
2) Jersey City Employment Service Center, Marsha Rabinowitz, Acting Manager, 438 Summit Ave, 1st Floor, Jersey City, NJ 07306; 201-795-8800; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
3) Hammonton Employment Service Office, Michael Lazarchick, Office Contact, 44 N. Whitehorse Pike, Suite A, Hammonton, NJ 08037; 609-561-8800; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
4) Hackensack Employment Service Office, Ms.Toby Frontera, Manager, 60 State Street, 2nd Floor, Hackensack, NJ 07601; 201-996-8950; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
5) Freehold Employment Service Office, Donald Robinson, Office Contact, Freehold Emply. Service Office, 3680 Rt. 9 South, Freehold, NJ 07728; 732-780-3272; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
6) Engelwood Employment Service Office, Ellen Yedwab, Office Contact, Engelwood Empl. Service Office, 40 Bennett Rd., Engelwood, NJ 07631; 201-568-9840; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
7) Morristown Employment Service Office, Doreen Brodsky, Office Contact, Morristown Employ.Service Office, 5 Sussex Ave, Morristown, NJ 07962; 973-631-6321; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
8) Fort Dix Employment Service Office, Kevin Fitzpatrick, Office Center, 24 Delaware Ave, Bldg. 5418, Fort Dix, NJ 08640; 609-723-5494; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
9) Vineland Employment Service Office, Geore Saunders, Acting Manager, 415 Landis Ave., 1st Floor, Vineland, NJ 08360; 856-696-6600; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
10) Tom River Employment Service Office, Will Rogers, Manager, 1027 Hooper Ae., Bldg. 6, Tom River, NJ 08753; 732-286-5616; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
11) Passaic Employment Service Office, Roy Davis, Acting Manager, Passaic Employment Ser. Cnt., 14-16 Howe St., Passaic, NJ 07055; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
12) Ocean County One Stop Career Center, Will Rogers, Manager, Ocean Co. One- Stop Career Center, 1959 Rt. 9, Toms River, NJ 08755; 732-286-6446; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
13) Newton Employment Service Office, John Mizin, Manager, Rt. 206, North Sussex County Mall, Newton, NJ 07860; 973-383-2775; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
14) Flemington Employment Service Office, Marilyn Caulkins, Office Contact, 71 Main Street, P.O. Box 905, Flemington, NJ 08822; 908-782-2371; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
15) Neptune Employment Service Office, Pat Reed, Manager, Neptune Employment Service Office, 60 Taylor Ave, Neptune, NJ 07753; 732-775-1566; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
16) Deptford Employment Service Office, Larry Haas, Office Contact, 1350 Delsen Dr., Suite 4, Deptford, NJ 08096; 856-384-3700; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
17) Atlantic City Employment Service Office, Mary Ellen Rucci, Manager, Atlantic City Empl. Service Office, 1433 Bacharach Blvd., Atlantic City, NJ 08401; 604-441-3294; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
18) Bayonne Employment Service Office, Della White, Office Contact, Bayonne Empl. Service Office, 797 Broadway, Bayonne, NJ 07002; 201-858-3037; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
19) Bloomfield Employment Service Office, Marilyn Glassberg, Manager, 57 Park St., 2nd Floor, Bloomfield, NJ 07003; 973-680-5550; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
20) Bridgeton Employment Service Office, Diane Wassel, Office Contact, 40 E. Broad St., Suite 102, Brighteton, NJ 08302; 856-453-3900; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
21) Burlington Employment Service Office, Richard Angelotti, Manager, Burlington Empl.Service Office, 220 W. Broad Street, Burlington, NJ 08016; 609-386-2244; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
22) Camden Employment Service Office, Anne Koelling, Office Contact, 2600 Mt. Ephraim Ave, Suite 102, Camden, NJ 08104; 856-614-3150; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
23) Phillipsbur Employment Service Office, John Mizin, Manager, Phillipsburg Employment Service Office, 75 South Main Street, Phillipsburg, NJ 08865; 908-859-4000; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
24) Lakewood Employment Service Office, Barbara Zino, Office Contact, 231 3rd St., 2nd Floor, Lakewood, NJ 08701; 732-905-5996; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
25) Perth Amboy Employment Service Office, Ed Garthwaite, Manager, 339 Maple St, 2nd Floor, Perh Amboy, NJ 08861; 732-293-5016; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
26) Meadowlands Employment Service Office, Robert Malec, Office Contact, 201 Rt. 17 North, 1st. Floor, Rutherford, NJ 07070; 201-939-5922; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
27) Dover Employment Service Office, William Weightman, Manager, Dover Empl.Service Office, 107 Bassett Hwy, Dover, NJ 07801; 973-361-9050; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
28) East Orange Employment Service Office, Angela Meola, Office Contact, 50 S. Clinton St., 4th Floor, East Orange, NJ 07018; 973-266-1990; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
29) Elizabeth Employment Service Office, Donna Westbrook, Manager, Elizabeth Empl.Service Office, 208 Commerce Place, Elizabeth, NJ 07201; 908-820-3181; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
30) Salem Employment Service Office, Kenneth Thomas, Office, Salem Employment Service Office, 164 Salem Woodstown Rd., Salem, NJ 08074; 856-935-7007; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
31) Newark Employment Service Office, Thomas Caldwell, Manager, Newark Employment Service Center, 1004 Broad St, Newark, NJ 07102; 973-648-3370; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
32) Cherry Hill Employment Service Office, Wendelin Laux, Office Contact, 1873 Route 70 East, Suite 304, Cherry Hill, NJ 08003; 856-751-8550; {www.wnjpin.state.nj.us}.
back to top

$10,530.00 To Train For A New Career in New York
Free entrepreneur training may be available while you collect unemployment benefits. Maximum payments are $405 per week. To see if you qualify contact the office below or one of the other one-stop centers that offer training to fill out an application. There are 3 steps after the applying. 1: Core Services (registration for job search) 2: Intensive Services (basic education skill testing) 3: Assessment for Training. If you are enable to obtain a job throughout the Core Services your counselor may be able to approve you for entrepreneur training. Training grant amount will be discussed with a career counselor. Check online at the Website given below you may be able to qualify for services. Once you qualify for training you may be eligible for extra money to pay for transportation, and other assistance to help you become successful. Ask your career counselor for details.
1) Niagara County Employment and Training, Trott ACCESS Center, 1001 Eleventh Street, Niagara Falls, NY 14301; 716-278-9194; {www.wdsny.org}.
2) Oyster Bay/North Hempstead/Glen Cove, Mineola Employment Center, 170 Old Country Road, Mineola, NY 11501; 516-873-5670; Fax: 516-873-7329; {www.wdsny.org}.
3) One Stop Career Center, 37-39 West Second Street, Oswego, NY 13126; 315-342-3905; Fax: 315-342-5414; {cs047@labor.state.ny.us}; {www.wdsny.org}.
4) Oswego County, One Stop Career Center, 200 North Second Street, Fulton, NY 13069; 315-591-9000; {www.wdsny.org}.
5) Orange County- Career Center of Orange County, The Maple Building, 3 Washington Center, Newburgh, NY 12550; 845-568-5090; Fax: 845-568-5377; {www.wdsny.org}.
6) Ontario /Seneca/Wayne/Yates (Finger Lakes), Onodaga Co. Workforce Development System, 677 South Salina Street, Syracuse, NY 13202; 315-473-8250; Fax: 315-472-9492; {ccjta@dreamscape.com}; {www.wdsny.org}.
7) Oneida County-Working Solutions One Stop Center, Working Solutions, 252 West Dominick Street, Rome, NY 13440; 315-337-7300; Fax: 315-339-7349; {www.wdsny.org}.
8) Oneida/Herkimer/Madison, Madison Co. Employment and Training, 1286 Upper Lenox Avenue, Oneida, NY 13421; 315-363-2400; Fax: 315-363-4545; {www.wdsny.org}.
9) One Stop Career Center, 100 Spring Street, Mexico, NY 13114; 315-963-5512; {www.wdsny.org}.
10) Oneida County-Working Solutions One Stop Center, New York State Office Bldg, 207 Genesee Street, 2nd Floor, Utica, NY 13501; 315-793-2229; Fax: 315-793-2216(empl. Service)/315-793-2509 (C.Serv); {www.wdsny.org}.
11) Monroe County Rochester Work! Career Center, Rochester Works! Career Center, 34 St. Paul Street, Rochester, NY 14604; 716-258-3500; {www.rnyworks.com}.
12) Tompkins County, Workforce Development Center, Center Ithaca 171 E. State Street, Ithaca, NY 14850; 607-272-7570; Fax: 607-272-2835; {www.wdsny.org}.
13) Sullivan County, Sullivan County One-Stop Center, 50 North Street, Monticello, NY 12701; 845-794-3340; Fax: 845-791-6851; {www.wdsny.org}.
14) Saratoga/Warren/Washington, Washington County, 383 Broadway, Fort Edward, NY 12828; 518-746-2391; Fax: 518-746-2392; {washeoc@capital.net}; {www.wdsny.org}.
15) Saratoga/Warren/Washington, Saratoga County, 152 West High Street, Ballston Spa, NY 12020; 518-884-4170; Fax: 518-884-4262; {www.wdsny.org}.
16) St. Lawrence County, St. Lawrence One-Stop Center, 101 Main Street, Canton, NY 13617; 914-356-5100; Fax: 914-356-5949; {www.wdsny.org}.
17) Rockland County, Tomorrow's Workplace, One Perlman Drive, Spring Valley, NY 10977; 914-356-5100; Fax: 914-356-5949; {www.wdsny.org}.
18) Putnam County, Westchester/Putnam One Stop, Donald B. Smith Govt. Center 110 Old Rte. 6, Carmel, NY 10512; 845-225-7043; {www.wdsny.org}.
19) Balance of Westchester County, NYS Department of Labor, 201 S. James Street, Peekskill, NY 10566; 914-737-3490; {www.wdsny.org}.
20) Balance of Westchester County, NYS Department of Labor, 120 Bloomingdale Road, White Plains, NY 10605; 914-997-9535; {www.wdsny.org}.
21) Balance of Westchester County, Office of Workforce Investment/One-Stop, 150 Grand Street, White Plains, NY 10601; 914-285-7580; {www.wdsny.org}.
22) Ulster County, Ulster Co. One-Stop Center, 651 Development Crt., Ulster Avenue, Kingston, NY 12401; 843-338-4696; {ecoo@co.ulser.ny.us}; {www.wdsny.org}.
23) New York City -Queens County, Queens County, 168-46 91st Avenue, Jamaica, NY 11432; 718-557-6751; {www.wdsny.org}.
24) Suffolk County, One-Stop Employment Center, 17 N. County Complex Veterans Memorial Highway, Hauppauge NY 11788; 516-853-6540; {www.co.suffolk.ny.us}.
25) Jefferson/Lewis -Jefferson County, The WorkPlace, 1222 Coffee Street, Watertown, NY 13601; 315-782-9252; Fax: 315-782-2073; {www.wdsny.org}.
26) Long Beach- West End Community Center, West End Community Center, Magnolia Boulevard, Long Beach, NY; {www.wdsny.org}.
27) Albany County-Career Central, Career Central, 230 Central Avenue, Albany, NY 12206; 518-447-5980; Fax: 518-447-5979; {www.wdsny.org}.
28) Freeport NYSDOL, NYSDOL, 84 North Main Street, Hempstead, NY 11550; {www.wdsny.org}.
29) Orange County- Career Center of Orange County, Career Center of Orange County, 33 Fulton Plaza, Middletown, NY 10940; 845-346-1100; Fax: 845-346-1107; {www.wdsny.org}.
30) Dept. of Occupational Resources Hempstead Exe. Plaza, Hempstead, 50 Clinton Street, Hempstead, NY 11550; 516-485-5000; Fax: 516-485-5009; {career-web.nassau.ny.us}; {www.wdsny.org}.
31) Genesee Co. Career Center Job Development Bureau, 587 East Main Street, Suite 100 Eastown Plaza, Batavia, NY 14020; 716-344-2042; Fax: 716-344-4495; {www.wdsny.org}.
32) Fulton/Montogomery/Schoharie, Schoharie County, 150 East Main Street, Cobleskill, NY 12043; 518-234-4254; Fax: 518-234-4256; {www.wdsny.org }.
33) Fulton/Montogomery/Schoharie, Amsterdam Mall, 2630 Riverfront Center, Amsterdam, NY 12010; 518-842-2240; Fax: 518-842-3802; {www.wdsny.org}.
34) Fulton/Montogomery/Schoharie, Gloversville Community Service Center, 199 South Main Street, Gloversville, NY 12078; 518-725-6473; Fax: 518-773-8202; {www.wdsny.org}.
35) Massapequa Employment Center, Massapequa Employment Center, 977 Hicksville Road, Massapequa, NY 11758; 516-797-4560; Fax: 516-797-4589; {tobiga04@erols.com}; {www.wdsny.org}.
36) Chemung/Schuyler/Steuben Workforce Development, Schuyler Co. Workforce Development, 210 12th Street, Watkins Glen, NY 14891; 607-535-0342; {wfd@onlineimage.com}; {www.workforce2.org}.
37) Schenectady County, Schenectady Job Training, 334 State Street, Schenectady, NY 12305; 518-382-5951; Fax: 518-382-5988; {www.wdsny.org}.
38) Broome Employment Center, Office of Employment and Training, Broome Employment Center, 81 State Street, Binghamton, NY 13901; 607-778-2136; Fax: 607-778-6480; {www.broomtiogaworks.com}.
39) Tioga County- Tioga Employment Center, Tioagoa Employment Center, 231 Main Street, Owego, NY 13827; 607-687-8500; Fax: 607-687-7759; {www.broomtiogaworks.com}.
40) Business Employment Service and Training Center, 2001 Perimeter Road East, Suite 3, Endicott, NY 13760; 607-741-4500; {www.broomtiogaworks.com}.
41) Allegany County Employment and Training Center, Allegany Co. Empl. And Training Cnt., 7 Wells Lane, Bellmont, NY 14813; 716-268-9240; Fax: 716-268-5176; {www.wdsny.org}.
42) Cattaraugus One Stop, Cattaraugus One Stop, 175 North Union Street, Olean, NY 14760; 716-373-1880; Fax: 716-375-2895; {www.wdsny.org}.
43) Cayuga County One Stop, Cayuga County One Stop, 1100 Corporate Drive, Auburn, NY 13021; 315-253-1590; {www.wdsny.org}.
44) Cortland Works Career Center, Cortland Works Career Center, 99 Main Street, Cortland, NY 13045; 607-756-7585; Fax: 607-756-7585; {www.wdsny.org}.
45) NYSDOL, 200 Lake Shore Drive West, Dunkirk, NY 14707; 716-366-0130; Fax: 716-366-0502; {www.wdsny.org}.
46) Saratoga/Warren/Washington, Warren County, Northway Plaza, Queensbury, NY 12804; 518-743-0925; Fax: 518-743-0820; {www.wdsny.org}.
47) Yonkers Employment Center, Yonkers Employment Center, 20 South Broadway, Yonkers, NY 10701; {www.wdsny.org}.
48) Rensselaer Co.- Ned Pattison Office Building, Ned Pattison Officel Bldg., 7th Avenue, Troy, NY 12180; 518-270-2860; Fax: 518-270-2876; {www.wdsny.org}.
49) Chemung/Schuyler/Steuben Workforce Development, Chemung Co. Workforce, 200 Baldwin Street, Elmira, NY 14901; 607-733-7131 Ext. 52; Fax: 607-737-8973; {cssdol@yahoo.com}; {www.workforce2.org}.
50) Chautauqua County- NYSDOL, NYSDOL, 25 Harrison Street, Jamestown, NY 14701; 716-664-2041; Fax: 716-664-9459; {www.wdsny.org}.
51) Chemung/Schuyler/Steuben Workforce Development, Steuben County Workforce Development, 20 Denison Parkway West, Corning, NY 14830; 607-937-8338; {csswfd@stny.rr.com}; {www.workforce2.org}.
52) Chemung/Schuyler/Steuben Workforce Development, Steuben Co. Workforce Development, 107 Broadway, Hornell, NY 14843; 607-324-8402; {onestop@infoblvd.net}; {www.workforce2.org}.
53) Steuben Co. Workforce Development, Steuben Co. Workforce Development, 117 East Steuben Street, Bath, NY 14810; 607-776-7712; {draperc@proactionc.com}; {www.workforce2.org}.
54) Chenango/Delaware/Otsego, Otsego Co. -NYSDOL, 12 Deitz Street, Oneonta, NY 13820; 607-432-4800; Fax: 607-432-8130; {information@oet.org}; {www.wdsny.org}.
55) Clinton/Essex/Franklin/Hamilton, Essex Co. Workforce Development, 2 Church Street, Elizabethtown, NY 12932; 518-873-2341; Fax: 518-873-2392; {www.wdsny.org}.
56) Franklin County, Finney Boulevard, Woodward Street, Malone, NY 12953; 518-481-5755; {malone@oneworkssource.com}; {www.wdsny.org}.
57) Columbia/Greene- Columbia-Greene Community College, Columbia Co., 4400 Route 23, Hudson, NY 12534; 518-828-4181 Ext.5510; Fax: 518-828-8543; {www.wdsny.org}.
58) Dutchess County- Dutchess WORKS, Dutchess WORKS, 235 Main Street, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601; 845-473-9000; {www.wdsny.org}.
59) Erie County Workforce, Erie County, 506 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202; 716-884-7862; {www.buffpic.org}.
60) Erie County Workforce, Erie County, 3176 Abbott Road, Blasdell, NY 14172; 716-825-2525; {www.buffpic.org}.
back to top

Up To $10,468.00 To Train For A New Career in Virginia

Free entrepreneur training may be available while you collect unemployment benefits. Maximum payments are $268 per week. To see if you qualify contact the office below or one of the other one-stop centers that offer training to fill out an application. There are 3 steps after the applying. 1: Core Services (registration for job search) 2: Intensive Services (basic education skill testing) 3: Assessment for Training. If you are enable to obtain a job throughout the Core Services your counselor may be able to approve you for entrepreneur training. Training must not exceed $3,000 in the state. Once you qualify for training you may be eligible for extra money to pay for transportation. Ask your career counselor for details.
1) Fredericksburg Employment Commission Area 13, Becky Speriazza, Manager, 3501 Lafayette Blvd., P.O. Box 7106, Fredericksburg, VA 22404; 504- 898-3806; Fax: 540-891-3128; {Frederick@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}; {www.careernet.state.va.us}.
2) Virginia Employment Commission Area 6, Peter Mocarski, Manager, North Piedmont Workforce Develop. Coalition, 529 Meadowbrook Shopping Center, Culpepper, VA 22701; 504-829-7430; Fax: 504- 829-7435; {p.m.ocarski@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}; {www.careernet.state.va.us}.
3) Virginia Employment Commission Area 15, Marietta Salyer, Manager, Tri-Cities Office, 5240 Oaklawn Blvd., Hopewell, VA 23860; 804- 541-6541; Fax: 804- 541-6517; {Petersburg@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}; {www.careernet.state.va.us}.
4) Virginia Employment Commission Area 15, Louise Tomlinson, Manager, Virginia Employment Commission, 1746 E. Atlantic Street, Emporia, VA 23847; 804- 634-2326; Fax: 804- 634-9943; {emporia@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}; {www.careernet.state.va.us}.
5) Virginia Employment Commission Area 13, Cynthia Holdren, Manager, P.O. Box 9, Unit 16, 25036 Lankford Highway (Rt. 13), Onley, VA 23418; 757- 302-2029; Fax: 757-302-2026; {onley@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}; {www.careernet.state.va.us}.
6) Virginia Employment Commission Area 13, Rick Harper, Manager, P.O. Box 67, 4243 Historyland Highway, Warsaw, VA 22572; 804-333-3675; Fax: 804- 333-5388; {warsaw@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}; {www.careernet.state.va.us}.
7) Virginia Employment Commission Area 15, Marietta Salyer, Manager, Petersburg Intensive Services Satellite Office, 114 North Union Street, Petersburg, VA 23803; 804- 541-6541; Fax: 804- 541-6517; {www.vec.state.va.us}; {www.careernet.state.va.us}.
8) Virginia Employment Commission, Carroll Sisk, Manager, Virginia Employment Commission, 192 Bristol East Rd., Bristol, VA 24202; 540-642-7350; Fax: 540-642-7361; {bristol@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
9) Virginia Employment Commission Area 13, Sherry Pearson, Manager, Job Assistance Center (LLC), P.O. Box 1371, Saluda, VA 23149; 804- 758-4683; 800-290-5982; Fax: 804- 758-3678; {jac@oasisonline.com}; {www.vec.state.va.us}; {www.careernet.state.va.us}.
10) Virginia Employment Commission- Area 9&10, Trish Williams, Manager, Virginia Employment Commission, 6707 Warwick Road, Richmond, VA 23225; 804-674-2368; Fax: 804-674-3655; {richmondsouth@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
11) Workforce Job Center Area 4, Florhline Painter, Owner, Manager, Workforce Job Center, 58 West Main Street, Luray, VA 22835; 540-743-4320; Fax: 540-743-7609; {jobcenterluray@yahoo.com}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
12) Virginia Employment Commission Area 7, Larry Barbour, Assistant Manager, P.O. Box 10849, 3125 Odd Fellows Road, Lynchburg, VA 24501; 804-947-6671; Fax: 804-947-2339; {lynchburg@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
13) Virginia Employment Commission Area 2, Betty Keith, Manager, 1590 North Main Street, P.O.Box 1650, Marion, VA 24354; 540-781-7431; {marion@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
14) Goodwill Industries of the Valley, Inc. Area 2, Linda Matthews, Supervisor, Workforce Development Center, 211 Main Street, Suite 102, Narrows, VA 24124; 540-674-1721; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
15) Nottoway Co. Dept. of Social Services- Area 8, Robert Reitmeir, Director, Nottoway Co. Dept. Social Services, P.O. Box 26, Nottoway, VA 23955; 804-465-8494: {rhr135@piedmont.dss.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
16) Virginia Employment Commission- Area 2, Jerry Frye, Manager, Virginia Employment Commission, 206 Third Avenue, Radford, VA 24141; 540-831-5980; Fax: 540-831-6137; {radford@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
17) Virginia Employment Commission Area 11&12, Dennis McKinney, Director, JobLink, 2026 Eisenhower Ave., Suite 140, Alexandria, VA 22314; 703-838-4316; Fax: 703-548-0483; {joblink@ci.alexandria.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
18) Virginia Employment Commission- Area 9, Mark Spatig, Manager, 3751 Nine Mile Road, Suite A, Richmond, VA 23223; 804-236-3500,3515; Fax: 804-236-3540; {richmondeast@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
19) Goodwill Industries of the Valley, Inc. Area 2, Linda Matthews, Supervisor, Goodwill Industries, 323 Floyd Highway South, Floyd, VA 24091; 540-674-1721; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
20) Virginia Employment Commission-Area 9, Sue Scott, Manager, Virginia Employment Commission, 5211 West Broad Street, Richmond, VA 23225; 804-662-9614; Fax: 804-662-9496; {richmondwest@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
21) Virginia Employment Commission- Area 3, Bruce Johannessen, Manager, Virginia Employment Commission, 5060 Valley View Blvd., Roanoke, VA 24012; 540-561-7525; Fax: 540-561-6672; {roanoke@vec.state.va.us}; {http://vec.eac.Home .att.net}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
22) Virginia Employment Commission- Area 5, Gene Scultz, Manager, Virginia Employment Commission, 100 Premier Place, Winchester , VA 22602; 540-722-3415; {winchester@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
23) Capitol Area Training Consortium-Area 9, Rosalyn Key, Director, Capitol Area Training Consortium, 5410 Williamsburg Rd., Sandston, VA 23150; 804-226-1941 ; Fax: 804-236-0503; {key@co.henrico.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
24) Capitol Area Training Consortium- Area 9, Rick Bradley, Director, Capitol Area Training Consortium, 7321 Whitepine Road, Richmond, VA 23237; 804-271-8510; Fax: 804-275-0270; {bra18@co.henrico.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
25) Richmond Career Advancement Center- Area 10, Donald Sandridge, Director, Richmond Career Advancement Center, 201 West Broad St., Richmond, VA 23222; 804-780-4146; Fax: 804-780-6092; {sdandrid@tdc-usa.org}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
26) Virginia Employment Commission -Area 2, Roger Frye, Manager, 870 East Main Street, P.O. Box 673, Wytheville, VA 24382; 540-288-4051; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
27) People Incorporated Area 2, Linda Matthews, Supervisor, People Incorporated, 1173 West Main Street, Abington, VA 24210; 540-623-9000; Fax: 540-628-2931; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
28) Virginia Employment Commission Area 8, Dorothy Holcomb, Manager, Virginia Employment Commission, P.O. Box 392, Farmville, VA 23901; 804- 392-8871; Fax: 804- 392-1893; {holcomb@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
29) Virginia Employment Commission Area 8, Linda Danielle, Manager, South Boston, 1438 Seymour Dr., South Boston, VA 24592; 804- 572-8270,8674; Fax: 804- 572-3800; {ldanielle@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
30) Virginia Employment Commission Area 8, Dave West, Manager, Employment Specialist, Virginia Workforce Center, P.O. Box 370, Charlotte Court House, VA 23923; 804-542-5605; Fax: 804-392-8871; {dwest@charlottejobs.org}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
31) Virginia Employment Commission Area 1, Paul Street, Manager, Virginia Employment Commission, P.O. Box 1850, Cedar Bluff, VA 24609; 540-964-7463; Fax: 540-963-6207; {cedar@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
32) Virginia Employment Commission Area 1, Gary Hale, Manager, VA. Employment Workforce Commission Center, P.O. Box 660, Norton, VA 24273; 540-679-9413,9416,9417; Fax: 540-679-9203; {ghale@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
33) Virginia Employment Commission Area 3, W. Allen Downey, Manager, Virginia Employment Commission, 106 North Maple Ave., Covington, VA 24426; 540-962-0983; Fax: 504-962-8750; {covington@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
34) Virginia Employment Commission Area 4, Taylor Howell, Manager, P.O. Box 351, 1909-A East Market Street, Harrisonburg, VA 22801; 540-434-2513; Fax: 540-434-0803; {harrisonburg@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
35) Virginia Employment Commission Area 3, Francie Cumby, Manager, Franklin Co. Workforce Development Consortium, 70 Wray Street, Rocky Mount, VA 24151; 540-483-0179; Fax: 540-483-1297; {fcumby@yahoo.com}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
36) Virginia Employment Commission Area 2, William Webb, Manager, 963 East Stuart Drive, P.O. Box 1398, Galax, VA 24333; 540-236-5105; Fax: 540-236-6119; {galax@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
37) Virginia Employment Commission, Mrs. Dean, Manager, Alexandria One Stop Service Center, 5520 Cherokee Ave. Suite 100, Alexandria, VA 22312; 703-813-1300; Fax: 703-813-1338; {alexandria@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us].
38) Virginia Employment Commission Area 11&12, Carla Leap, Director, Arlington Employment Center, 3033 Wilson Blvd., Suite 400B, Arlington, VA 22201; 703-228-1400; Fax: 703-228-1044; {dhs@co.arlington.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
39) Virginia Employment Commission Area 8, Sharon Dull, Manager, Box 191, 2164 E. Midland Trail, Buena Vista, VA 24416; 540-261-2188; Fax: 540-260-1714; {buenavista@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vaworkforce.com}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
40) Virginia Employment Commission Area 6, Don Martin, Manager, Workforce Today, 400 Preston Ave, Charlottesville, VA 22902; 804-984-7630; {charlottesville@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
41) Goodwill Industries of the Valley, Inc.- Area 2, Linda Matthews, Supervisor, 270 West Main Street, Suite 4, Christiansburg, VA 24073; 540-381-0838; Fax: 540-381-1257; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
42) Virginia Employment Commission Area 4, Linda Broughman, Manager, P.O. Box 240, 2631 Jefferson Highway, Fishersville , VA 22939; 540-332-7750; Fax: 540-332-7764; {fishersville@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
43) Virginia Workforce Center Area 8, Carolyn Leslie, Manager, 910 N. Mecklenburg Ave., P.O. Box 485, South Hill, VA 23970; 804- 447-7103; Fax: 804-447- 5842; {cleslie@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.
Virginia Employment Commission Area 3, Bruce Johannaessen, Manager, Virginia Employment Commission, 5060 Valley View Blvd., Roanoke, VA 24012; 540-561-7480,7525; Fax: 540-561-6672; {roanoke@vec.state.va.us}; {www.vec.state.va.us}.

Opportunities for the Blind
Opportunities for the Blind is an organization that helps blind individuals achieve their career goals. Financial assistance is offered to legally blind U.S. citizens of working age to assist with career development. Categories of funding include: scholarships and training, self-employment projects, special equipment, and job-related services. All prospective applicants must first call the toll-free number listed below, between 8am and 4pm EST (Mon-Fri) to schedule an eligibility interview by phone. Contact Opportunities for the Blind, P.O. Box 510, Leonardtown, MD 20650; 800-884-1990; {E-mail: oppblind@yahoo.com}; {www300.us.hsanet.net/oppblind/index.htm}.
back to top

Money for College for Navy Personnel
The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is a nonprofit, charitable organization that provides financial, educational, and other assistance to members of the Naval Services of the United States, and their eligible family members and survivors, when in need. To do this, counseling, loans, grants, various services, and referral to other community resources are available. There are no fees for such help. At the request of the Department of the Navy, the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society has agreed to administer the Pentagon Assistance Fund, designed to provide financial assistance to the families of Navy personnel killed during the September 11th terrorist attack on the Pentagon. Primary emphasis will be given to ensuring that, as their needs require, all dependent children and spouses will have the opportunity to complete their college education. Contact NMCRS Headquarters, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, 801 N. Randolph Street, Suite 1228, Arlington, VA 22203-1978; 703-696-4904.
back to top

Money for College for Surviving Children
The Citigroup Relief Fund was established to provide scholarships for the children of those that died or were disabled in the September 11th attacks. Individual scholarship amounts are based on financial need and funds availability. Funds may only be used for an accredited two or four-year college or university and may be renewable for up to three years. Contact Citigroup Relief Fund, 850 Third Ave., 13th Floor, New York, NY 10043; 888-441-CITI (toll-free); 212-793-5942; {E-mail citigrouprelieffund@citi.com}; {www.citigroup.com/citigroup/relieffund/}.
back to top

Education Fund to Benefit Victims' Children
Nokia, in close cooperation with the International Youth Foundation, has established a new global fund for the college education needs of children who have lost a parent in the unfortunate tragedies in the United States on September 11th. Nokia's intent is to ensure a long-term impact by providing younger generations with the resources they need to succeed. Respective universities and colleges will do the selections of the students eligible for the scholarships. Contact: Nokia Corporate Communications, Megan Matthews, Phone: 972-894-4267, E-mail: communication.corp@nokia.com International Youth Foundation, 32 South Street, Suite 500, Baltimore, MD 21202, Phone: 410-951-1500, Fax: 410-347-1188, E-mail: youth@iyfnet.org, www.iyfnet.org
back to top

$2,500 in Scholarship Money for Victims' Children
Major power companies across the U.S. and beyond have come together to establish The Power of America Fund. The object of the fund is to make sure that the dependents left behind are not cut off from the opportunity for a college education due to the death of their parent. The fund is coordinated thru the Scholarship & Recognition Program and administered by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, NJ. This is a one-time scholarship of $2,500.00 and is provided upon enrollment at an accredited American Institution of Higher Education. Contact {www.powerofamerica.org}.
back to top

Law Firm Offers Scholarship at NYU
The Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz Scholarship Fund at New York University has been established to help provide for the children of the firefighters, police officers and emergency medical services personnel who lost their lives responding to the World Trade Center Tragedy. The scholarship fund will be used to provide full tuition, room, and board at NYU. Eligibility will be determined by NYU in consultation with the New York City Police Department, the Fire Department of New York and the port Authority of New York and New Jersey. This scholarship is not limited to New York City residents. Contact New York University, Wachtell, Lipton Scholarship Fund, 25 West 4th Street, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10012; Contact: John Beckman; Assistant Vice President; Office of Public Affairs; 212-998-6848; {E-mail: jhb5@is6.nyu.edu}; {www.nyu.edu/publicaffaires/index.html}.
back to top

Scholarships and Other Support for Families of Fallen Firefighters
The National Fallen Firefighters Foundation has developed and expanded programs to honor fallen fire heroes and assist their families and coworkers. In response to our national tragedy, the Foundation is working with FEMA and USFA to ensure that all necessary support systems are in place to best meet the needs of the fire service family. Programs include the Survivor Support Network, National Scholarship programs and a newsletter for survivors. Contact National Fallen Firefighters Foundation, P.O. Drawer 498, Emmitsburg, MD 21727; 301-447-1365; Fax: 301-447-1645; {Email: firehero@erols.com}: {www.firehero.org}.
back to top

Money for College for Children Who Have Lost a Parent in the Line of Duty
The Silver Shield Foundation assists the funding of education for children who have lost a parent in the line of duty. Surviving dependents of New York City police officers and firefighters; New York, New Jersey and Connecticut state troopers and members of other law enforcement agencies with a fifty mile radius of Manhattan are eligible for these benefits. Contact The Silver Shield Foundation, 420 Lexington Avenue #2320, New York, NY 10170; 212-499-0866; Fax: 212-499-9075; {E-Mail: silvershield@changingourworld.com}; {www.silvershieldfoundation.org/}.
back to top

Scholarship Money for Victims' Children

The National Burglar and Fire Alarm Association is the nations oldest and largest organization representing the electronic systems industry. They have had an established scholarship program with the intent of strengthening the relationship between electronic systems professionals and police and fire officials by providing their sons and daughters with money for college. In the wake of the terrorist attacks, they will expand this program to include a scholarship fund dedicated for the children of the police and firefighters who perished in the line of duty. Contact National Burglar and Fire Alarm Association, 8300 Colesville Road #500, Silver Spring, MD 20910; 301-585-1855; Fax: 301-585-1866; {E-Mail: staff@alarm.org}; {www.alarm.org/what_s_New/Hero_Scholarship/hero_scholarship.html}.
back to top

Scholarship Fund for Victims' Spouses and Children
The Points of Light Foundation and USA Weekend, in partnership with Citizens Scholarship Fund of America, initiated the Make a Difference Day Scholarship Fund in response to the September 11th tragedy. The Fund will provide post secondary education benefits to children and spouses of those killed or disabled in the attack. Contact Make a Difference Day, Scholarship Fund, Points of Light Foundation, 1400 I Street NW #800, Washington, DC 20005; 800-750-7653; {www.pointsoflight.org}.
back to top

Scholarships For Victims' Children or Those Disabled
The Citizens' Scholarship Foundation of America is a joint venture of several non profits to provide college assistance to children, spouses, and those permanently disabled due to the terrorists attacks. This fund is also open to airline employees, passengers, relief workers, fire fighters, police officers, and others effected by the disaster. For more information contact Citizens' Scholarship Foundation of America, 1505 Riverview Rd., P.O. Box 297, St. Peter, MN 56082; 800-335-1102: {www.familiesoffreedom.org}.
back to top

Education Fund for Victims' Children
The Associated General Contractors of America Education and Research Foundation has established a "Terrorist Victims Fund" to assist the children of those killed in the September 11, 2001 attacks against the United States. The purpose of the fund is to help offset educational expenses incurred by the loss of income from a family member who perished in these attacks. Disbursements of the fund will give preference to children of craft and management employees of construction firms. Contact Associated General Contractors of America, 333 John Carlyle Street #200, Alexandria, VA 22314; Contact: Shannon Knutti; 703-837-5346; {Email: knuttis@agc.org}; 703-548-3118; Fax: 703-548-3119; {E-Mail: info@agc.org}; {www.agc.org}.
back to top

Free Groceries and Job Training for DC Residents
Community Family Life Services is a non-profit inclusive Christian organization that facilitates personal growth, independence and integration into the community for the Home less and low-income families and individuals, regardless of their faith. Services include a weekly distribution of groceries; job training, referrals, and employment; and counseling to help the unemployed, poor, and Home less find and keep good jobs. Those enrolled in the job training programs receive weekly stipends. Contact Community Family Life Services, 305 E. Street N.W., Washington, DC 20001; 202-347-0511; {www.cfls.1.org}.
back to top

Free Job Training and Employment Services
Goodwill Industries runs the EmployAbility Institute, a one-stop career center offering free education, job training and employment services. The Institute has counselors on staff to assist with career planning, resume writing, and interview preparation. Contact Goodwill Industries, 2835 Route 73, Maple Shade, NJ 08052; 856-439-0200; {www.goodwillnj.org}.
back to top

Scholarship Fund for Victims' Families
Power companies across the US and the World have come together to establish the Power of America Fund to ensure future educational assistance to the surviving dependents of the victims of the September 11th terrorist attacks. The fund will be administered by the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, NJ. Contact Power of America Fund, 1055 St. Charles Avenue #100, New Orleans, LA 70130; 877-285-2006; {www.powerofamerica.org}.
back to top

350 Colleges You Can Go To For Free
Believe it or not, more than 350 colleges and universities all across the country have special programs for seniors who are interested in going back to school. This often means free or low-cost tuition, discounts on fees and books, and even special deals on housing, if you feel like living in a dorm and blasting your Benny Goodman records to all hours of the night! Anyone interested should contact the school they wish to attend to find out how to apply for a discount or waiver. Some limitations and restrictions may apply, such as residency and space availability.
Tuition and basic fees are based on the lowest fees (in-state, in-district, in-county, non-degree seeking, undergraduate etc.). Special fees may apply to some classes. Generally, lab, books and materials are additional, and vary depending upon class. Some other additional fees include parking, health insurance, and a fee for degree seeking and graduate students. An interested individual should contact the school they wish to attend to find out how to apply for a discount or waiver. Qualifications vary from school to school. Some limitations and restrictions apply such as an income limit, residency, and space availability.
Scroll down to see the opportunities in your state.

back to top

Alabama
•Gadsden State Community College, Admissions, P.O. Box 227, Gadsden, AL 35902-0227, 205-549-8201, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Jefferson State Community College, Admissions, 2601 Carson Rd., Birmingham, AL 35215-3098, 205-853-1200, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $4 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Livingston University, Station 2, Livingston, AL 35470, 205-652-3400, Minimum Age: 55, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $15 one time application fee, Credit: no
•University of Montevallo, Station 6030, Montevallo, AL 35115, 205-665-6065, 800-292-4349, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $15 per class, Credit: no
back to top

Alaska
•Prince William Sound Community College, P.O. Box 97, Valdez, AK 99686, 907-835-2678, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $2.50 for 1-3 credit hours; $5 for 4-5 credit hours;, $25 for 7+ credit hours, Credit: yes
•University of Alaska/ Anchorage, Enrollment Services, 3211 Providence Dr., Anchorage, AK 99508, 907-786-1525, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $45 for 3 credit hours; $57 for 6 credit hours, Credit: yes
•University of Alaska/ Fairbanks, Admissions and Records, P.O. Box 757640, Fairbanks, AK 99775-0060, 907-474-7821, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $25 for 3 credit hours; $155 for 12 credit hours; parking and health insurance can be waived if not needed, Credit: yes
•University of Alaska/ Southeast, 11120 Glacier Hwy., Juneau, AK 99801, 907-465-6457, Minimum, Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $5 for 1 credit hour; $8 for 2 credit hours; $17 for, 3+ credit hours, Credit: yes
back to top

Arizona
•Arizona Western College, P.O. Box 929, Yuma, AZ 85366-0929, 602-726-1050, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $16 per credit hour, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Central Arizona College, Student Records, 8470 North Overfield Rd., Coolidge, AZ 85228, 520, 426-4444, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $18 per credit hour with the 6th, 16th, 17th and 18th free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

Arkansas
•Arkansas State University, Admissions, P.O. Box 1630, State University, Jonesboro, AR 72467-1630, 800-382-3030, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $4 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Arkansas State University: Beebe Branch, P.O. Drawer H, Beebe, AR 72012, 501-882-6452, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none (auto sticker $5), Credit: yes
•Arkansas Tech University, Admissions, Russelville, AR 72801-2222, 501-968-0343, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•East Arkansas Community College, 1700 Newcastle Rd., Forest City, AR 72335-9598, 501-633-4480, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $3 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Garland County Community College, 101 College Dr., Hot Springs, AR 71913, 501-767-9371, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $10 per session, Credit: yes
•Henderson State University, Registrar, P.O. Box 7534, Arkadelphia, AR 71999-7534, 501-203-5000, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $36 for 3 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Northern Arkansas Community College, Pioneer Ridge, Harrison, AR 72601, 501-743-3000, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Phillips County Community College, Campus Dr., P.O. Box 785, Helena, AR 72342, 501-338-6474, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

California
•California State University - Sacramento, Re-Entry Services, 6000 J St., Sacramento, CA 95819-6048, 916-278-6750, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $3 per session, Basic Fees: none (students receive free public transportation in the Sacramento area), Credit: yes
back to top

Colorado
•Adams State College, Alamosa, CO 81102, 719-589-7712, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Colorado Mountain College: Alpine Campus, 1330 Bob Adams Dr., Steamboat Springs, CO 80487, 970-870-4444, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $32 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $50 for 0-9 credit hours; $65 for 12+ credit hours, Credit: yes
•Colorado State University, Admissions, Ft. Collins, CO 80523, 970-491-6909, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Metropolitan State College of Denver, Adult Learning Services, P.O. Box 173362, Denver, CO 80217, 303-556-8342, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Colorado, Boulder, Regent Administrative Center 125, Office of Admissions, Campus Box 6, Boulder, CO 80309, 303-492-6301, Minimum Age: 55, Tuition: member of alumni $5 per session; non-alumni member $15 per session, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Colorado at Denver, P.O. Box 173364, Campus Box 146, Denver, CO 80217-3364, 303-556-2400, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Northern Colorado, Admissions, Greeley, CO 80639, 970-351-2881, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
back to top

Connecticut
•Asnuntuck Community College, Admissions, 170 Elm St., Enfield, CT 06082, 203-253-3043, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none (lab fee also waived), Credit: yes
•Central Connecticut State University, Admissions Office, 1615 Stanley St., New Britain, CT 06050, 860-832-3200, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $37 per semester, Credit: yes
•Eastern Connecticut State University, Registrar, 83 Windham St., Willimantic, CT 06226, 203-465-5389, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $12 per credit hour for part-time, Credit: yes
•University of Connecticut, Storrs, 2131 Hillside Rd., Storrs, CT 06269-3088, 203-486-3137, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $222 full-time per semester, Credit: yes
•University of Hartford, Adult Services, 200 Bloomfield Ave., West Hartford, CT 06117-0395, 203-768-4457, Minimum Age: 70, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $30 per semester (1 class limit), Credit: no
•Western Connecticut State University, Office of Continuing Education, 181 White St., Danbury, CT 06810, 203-837-8230, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $10 per semester (non-credit $10 per class), Basic Fees: Part-time none (full-time varies), Credit: yes
back to top

Delaware
•Delaware State College, Admissions, 1200 N. Dupont Hwy., Dover, DE 19901-2277, 302-739-4917, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $25 per semester, Credit: yes
•Delaware Technical and Community College: Jack F. Owens Campus, P.O. Box 610, Georgetown,, DE 19947, 302-856-5400, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Delaware Technical and Community College: Stanton/Wilmington Campus, 333 Shipley St., Wilmington, DE 19801, 302-571-5343, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Delaware Technical and Community College: Terry Campus, 1832 North Dupont Parkway, Dover, DE 19901, 302-741-2700, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

District of Columbia
•University of the District of Columbia, 1100 Harvard St., Room 114, Washington, DC 20008
202-274-5010, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free (50% off if going for a degree), Basic Fees: $20 per semester, Credit: yes
back to top

Florida
•Broward Community College, Ft. Lauderdale, Registration, 225 E. Lasolas Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301, 305-761-7465, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: the school will cover up to $181.50 of basic fees, Credit: yes
•Florida Atlantic University, 500 Northwest 20th St., Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991, 407-367-3294, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Florida International University, University Park, Miami, FL 33199, 305-348-2363, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Florida State University, 2249 University Ct., Tallahassee, FL 32306-1009, 850-644-6200, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Santa Fe Community College, P.O. Box 1530, 3000 NW 83rd St., Gainesville, FL 32602, 352-395-5443, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•University of Central Florida, P.O. Box 160111, Orlando, FL 32816-0111, 407-823-3000, Minimum, Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
back to top

Georgia
•Albany State College, 504 College Dr., Albany, GA 31705, 912-430-4650, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $10 per session, Credit: yes
•Armstrong State College, 11935 Abercorn St., Savannah, GA 31419, 800-633-2349, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $10 per session, Credit: yes
•Athens Area Technical Institute, US Highway 29 North, Athens, GA 30610-3099, 706-542-8050, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $12.50 per quarter, Credit: yes
•Bainbridge College, 2500 E. Shotwell St., Bainbridge, GA 31717, 912-248-2500, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Brunswick College, Admissions, 3700 Altama Ave., Brunswick, GA 31520-3644, 912-264-7253, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Clayton State College, Admissions/Registrar, P.O. Box 285, Morrow, GA 30260, 770-961-3400, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Columbus College, 4225 University Ave., Columbus, GA 31907-5645, 706-568-2035, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Georgia College, Admissions and Records, Campus Box 023, Milledgeville, GA 31061, 912-453-5004, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Georgia Southern University, Admissions, Landrum Box 8024, Statesboro, GA 30460-8024, 912-681-5531, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Georgia Southwestern College, 800 Wheatly St., Americus, GA 31709-4693, 912-928-1273, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4009, Atlanta, GA 30302-4009, 404-651-2365, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $82 per quarter, Credit: yes
back to top

Hawaii
•University of Hawaii: Hawaii Community College, 200 West Kawili St., Hilo, HI 96720, 808-933-3611, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free (no summer classes), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•University of Hawaii: Honolulu Community College, 874 Dillingham Blvd., Honolulu, HI 96817, 808-845-9129, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $10 per semester, Credit: yes
•University of Hawaii: Kapiolani Community College, 4303 Diamond Head Rd., Honolulu, HI 96816
808-734-9559, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $10 per semester, Credit: yes
•University of Hawaii: Kauai Community College, 3-1901 Kaomualii Hwy., Lihue, HI 96766
808-245-8212, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•University of Hawaii: Leeward Community College, 96-045 Ala Ike, Pearl City, HI 96782, 808-455-0217, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2600 Campus Rd., Honolulu, HI 96822, 808-956-8975, Minimum, Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•University of Hawaii: Maui Community College, 310 Kaahumanu Ave., Kahului, HI 96732, 808-244-9181, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $4 per session plus .50 cents per credit hour, Credit: yes
•University of Hawaii: Windward Community College, 45-720 Keaahala Rd., Kaneohe, HI 96744, 808-235-7432, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

Idaho
•Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, ID 83725, 800-824-7017, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $5 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $20 per semester, Credit: yes
•College of Southern Idaho, Admissions, P.O. Box 1238, Twin Falls, ID 83303-1238, 208-733-9554, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Idaho State University, Enrollment Planning, Campus Box 8054, Pocatello, ID 83209, 208-236-2123, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $5 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $20 per semester, Credit: yes
•Lewis Clark State College, 500 Eighth Ave., Lewiston, ID 83501, 208-799-5272, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $5 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $20 per semester, Credit: yes
•North Idaho College, Business Office, 1000 West Garden Ave., Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814, 208-769-3311, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $50 per credit hour), Basic Fees:, $130 full-time, Credit: yes
back to top

Illinois
•Belleville Area College, 2500 Carlyle Rd., Belleville, IL 62221, 618-235-2700, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $35 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $10 one time application fee, Credit: yes
•Chicago State University, 95th St. and King Dr., Chicago, IL 60628, 312-995-2513, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free (income limitation of $12,000 annually), Basic Fees: none (lab also waived), Credit: yes
•College of Du Page, 22nd St. and Lambert Rd., Glen Ellyn, IL 60137, 708-858-2800 ext. 2482, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $3.45 per credit hour, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Illinois State University, Adult Services, Campus Box 2200, Normal, IL 61790-2200, 309-438-2181, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Northern Illinois University, Office of Admissions, 101 Williston Hall, Dekalb, IL 60115-2857, 815-753-0446, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free (income limitation of $14,000 annually), Basic Fees: $20-$40 per session, Credit: yes
back to top

Indiana
•Ball State University, Office of Admission, Lucina Hall, Muncie, IN 47306, 317-285-8300, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $478 for 0-3 credit hours; $638 for 4-5 credit hours; $1008 for 6-8 credit hours), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Indiana University at Kokomo, P.O. Box 9003, Kokomo, IN 46904-9003, 317-453-2000, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 50% off up to 9 hours (regular tuition $83.30-87.05 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $15 maximum activity fee plus $2 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Indiana University-Purdue University at Fort Wayne, Financial Aid, 2101 Coliseum Blvd., East, Fort Wayne, IN 46805, 219-481-6820, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $80.25 per credit hour), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Indiana University Southeast, 4201 Grant Line Rd., New Albany, IN 47150, 812-941-2212, ext. 2335, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 50% off up to 9 hours (regular tuition $87.05 per credit hour), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•University of Southern Indiana, 8600 University Blvd., Evansville, IN 47712, 812-464-1765, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $5 per class, Basic Fees: $10 ID fee per session, Credit: yes
back to top

Iowa
•Clinton Community College, Enrollment Services, 1000 Lincoln Blvd., Clinton, IA 52732-6299, 319-242-6841, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $3.65 per semester hour, Basic Fees: $5.50 per hour, Credit: yes
•Des Moines Area Community College, Records and Services, 2006 South Ankeny Blvd., Ankeny, IA 50021, 515-964-6241, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Indian Hills Community College, Admissions, 525 Grandview St., Ottumwa, IA 52501, 515-683-5111, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $40 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $4.50 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Iowa Western Community College, Business, 923 East Washington St., Clarinda, IA 51632, 712-542-5117, Minimum Age: 55, Tuition: $22 per credit hour (3 credit hour limit per semester), Basic Fees: $15 one time application fee plus $6 per credit hour, Credit: yes
back to top

Kansas
•Allen County Community College, 1801 North Cottonwood St., Iola, KS 66749, 316-365-5116, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $28 per credit hour (book rental and fees are free), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Barton County Community College, Registrar, Rt. 3, Box 1362, Great Bend, KS 67530-9283, 316-792-2701 ext. 215, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free (must be resident of Colorado), Basic Fees: $10 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Butler County Community College, 901 South Haverhill Rd., Eldorado, KS 67042, 316-321-2222, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $10 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Cloud County Community College, 221 Campus Dr., P.O. Box 1002, Concordia, KS 66901-1002, 913-234-1435, Minimum Age: 55, Tuition: $24 per credit hour (fee will increase this fall), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Coffeyville Community College, 400 West 11th, Coffeyville, KS 67337, 316-251-7700, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $10 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Emporia State University, Admissions, 1200 Commercial, Emporia, KS 66801-5087, 316-341-5465, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Fort Hays State University, 600 Park St., Hays, KS 67601-4099, 913-628-4222, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Garden City Community College, Dean of Admissions, 801 Campus Dr., Garden City, KS 67846, 316-276-7611, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $7 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Hutchinson Community College, 1300 North Plum St., Hutchinson, KS 67501, 316-665-3535, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $21 per credit hour, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

Kentucky
•Ashland Community College, 1400 College Dr., Ashland, KY 41101, 606-329-2999, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Eastern Kentucky University, Coates Box 2A, 203 Jones Building, Richmond, KY 40475-3101, 606-622-2106, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Elizabethtown Community College, 600 College Street Rd., Elizabethtown, KY 42701, 502-769-1632, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Lexington Community College, 203 Oswald Building, Cooper Dr., Lexington, KY 40506-0235, 606-257-4872, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Madisonville Community College, 2000 College Dr., Madisonville, KY 42431, 502-821-2250, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Maysville Community College, 1755 US 68, Maysville, KY 41056, 606-759-7141, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Morehead State University, 306 Howell McDowell, Morehead, KY 40351, 606-783-2000, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Murray State University, Bursars Office, P.O. Box 9, Murray, KY 42071-0009, 502-762-3741, 800-272-4678, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Northern Kentucky University, Office of Admissions, Highland Heights, KY 41099-7010, 606-572-5220, 800-637-9948, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•University of Kentucky, 100 Funkhouser Bldg., Lexington, KY 40506-0054, 606-257-2000, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•University of Louisville, Admission AO, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292, 502-852-6531, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free (10% off non-academic), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

Louisiana
•Delgado Community College, 615 City Park Ave., New Orleans, LA 70119, 504-483-4114, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 3 credit hours free per semester, Basic Fees: $15 per semester, Credit: yes
•Grambling State University, P.O. Box 864, Grambling, LA 71245, 318-274-2435, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $15 per semester, Credit: yes
•Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Records and Registration, 112, Thomas Boyd Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, 504-388-1175, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Louisiana State University at Alexandria, Financial Aid, 8100 Highway 71 South, Alexandria, LA 71302-9633, 318-473-6423, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Louisiana State University - Baton Rouge, Office of Admissions, Room 110 Thomas Boyd Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, 504-388-1175, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Louisiana State University at Eunice, P.O. Box 1129, Eunice, LA 70535, 318-457-7311, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $10 per semester, Credit: yes
•Louisiana State University in Shreveport, Admissions and Records, One University Place, Shreveport, LA 71115, 318-797-5207, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free; one time application fee of $5, Basic Fees: $50 for part-time; $65 for full-time, Credit: yes
•Louisiana Tech University, P.O. Box 3178, Tech Station, Ruston, LA 71272, 318-257-3036, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: 1 class per quarter free, Basic Fees: $35 per quarter, Credit: yes
•McNeese State University, P.O. Box 92495, Lake Charles, LA 70609, 318-475-5000, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 3 credit hours free per semester, Basic Fees: $10 per semester, Credit: yes
•Nicholls State University, P.O. Box 2004, College Station, Thibodaux, LA 70310, 504-448-4139, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 3 credit hours free per semester, Basic Fees: $10 per semester, Credit: yes
•Northeast Louisiana University, Student Affairs, Office of the Registrar, Monroe, LA 71209-1110, 318-342-5252, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 3 credit hours free per semester, Basic Fees: $15 per semester, Credit: yes
•Northwestern State University, Fiscal Affairs, Cashier Section, Natchitoches, LA 71497, 318-357-4503, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 3 credit hours free per semester, Basic Fees: $5 one time application fee, Credit: yes
•Southeastern Louisiana University, Enrollment Services, P.O. Drawer 752, Hammond, LA 70402-0752, 504-549-2123, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 3 credit hours free per semester, Basic Fees: $10 per semester, Credit: yes
back to top

Maine
•University of Maine, Admissions, 7513 W. Chadbourne Hall, Orono, ME 04469, 207-581-1561, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $9 for 3 credit hours; $246.50 for 12 credit hours, Credit: yes
•University of Maine at Augusta, Admissions, 46 University Dr., Augusta, ME 04330, 207-621-3000, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $4.50 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•University of Maine at Farmington, 102 Main St., Farmington, ME 04938, 207-778-7052, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: no reduced rate; case by case basis, Basic Fees: case by case basis, Credit: yes
•University of Maine at Fort Kent, Admissions, 25 Pleasant St., Fort Kent, ME 04743, 207-834-7500, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free (2 course limit), Basic Fees: $20 for 6 credit hours, Credit: yes
back to top

Maryland
•Alleghany Community College, Continuing Education, Willow Brook Rd., Cumberland, MD 21502, 301-724-7700, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free (non-academic only), Basic Fees: up to $3 per course, Credit: no
•Baltimore City Community College, Registration, 2901 Liberty Heights Ave., Baltimore, MD 21215
410-462-8300, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $20 per credit hour (non-credit $10 per course), Credit: yes
•Bowie State University, Human Resources, 14000 Jericho Park Rd., Bowie, MD 20715, 301-464-6515, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $83.50 for 0-11 credit hours; $369 for 12+ credit hours, Credit: yes
•Coppin State College, Human Resources, 2500 W. North Ave., Baltimore, MD 21216, 410-383-5990, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: part-time $47 plus $8 per credit hour; $333 for 12 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Frostburg State University, Admissions, Frostburg, MD 21532-1099, 687-680-4201, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free (3 course limit), Basic Fees: 9 credit hours approximately $115, Credit: yes
•Salisbury State University, Human Resources, Camden and College Avenues, Salisbury, MD 21801-6862, 410-543-6035, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free (2 course limit), Basic Fees: 6 credit, hours approximately $18, Credit: yes
•St. Mary's College of Maryland, Admission, St. Mary's City, MD 20686, 301-862-0292, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free; apply for waiver, Basic Fees: $230 for 9-11 credit hours if space available, Credit: yes
•University of Maryland - College Park, Golden ID Program, College Park, MD 20742,m 301-314-8237, Minimum Age: 65 (60 if employed less than 20 hours per week), Tuition: $103.50 per semester (3 class limit per semester), Basic Fees: $30 one time application fee, Credit: yes
back to top

Massachusetts
•Berkshire Community College, 1350 West St., Pittsfield, MA 01201, 413-499-4660, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $25 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Boston University, 881 Commonwealth Ave., 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02215, 617-353-2300, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $20 per course, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Bridgewater State College, Gates House, Bridgewater, MA 02325, 508-697-1237, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 50% off regular fee, Basic Fees: $201.42 for 3 credit hours; $491.25 for 12 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Briston Community College, 777 Elsbree St., Fall River, MA 02720, 508-678-2811, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $42 for 3 credit hours, $55 for 4 credit hours, Basic Fees: none
Credit: yes
•Bunker Hill Community College, 250 New Rutherford Ave., Boston, MA 02129-2991, 617-228-2000, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $35 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Cape Cod Community College, Rt. 132, West Barnstable, MA 02668-1599, 508-362-2131, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 50% off fees; apply for waiver, Basic Fees: $138 for 3 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Salem State College, 352 Lafayette St., Salem, MA 01970, 508-741-6200, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $41-60 per credit, Basic Fees: $61 per credit hour; full-time $743.50, Credit: yes
•North Adams State College, Admissions, Church St., North Adams, MA 01247, 413-662-5000, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

Michigan
•Alpena Community College, 666 Johnson St., Alpena, MI 49707, 517-356-9021, Minimum Age: 60, Basic Fees: $10 per session plus $6 per credit hour, Tuition: free, Credit: yes
•Central Michigan University, Admissions, 105 Warriner Hall, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, 517-774-3076, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Charles Stewart Mott Community College, 4503 East Court St., Flint, MI 48503, 810-762-0200, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free (50% off non-academic), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Delta College, Admissions, University Center, MI 48710, 517-686-9092, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $65 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $25 per session, Credit: yes
•Glen Oaks Community College, 62249 Shimmel Rd., Centreville, MI 49032, 616-467-9945, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: based on context hours, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Macomb Community College, 2800 College Dr., SW, Sidney, MI 48885-0300, 517-328-2111 ext. 215, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: in-district 50% off tuition; out-of-district $22 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $1.50 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Oakland Community College, District Office, George AB, Administration Center, 2480 Opdyke Rd., Bloomfield Hills, MI 48304-2266, 810-540-1567, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 20% off (regular tuition $47 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $35 per session, Credit: yes
•Wayne State University, Office of Undergraduate Admission, Detroit, MI 48202, 313-577-3577, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $98 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $70 per semester, Credit: yes
•Western Michigan University, Office of Admission and Orientation, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5120, 616-387-2000, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, 515 East Jefferson, 1220 Student Activities, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-1316, 313-764-7433, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition full-time $2,500), Basic Fees: $87 per term, Credit: yes
back to top

Minnesota
•Anoka-Ramsey Community College, 11200 Mississippi Blvd., NW, Coon Rapids, MN 55433, 612-427-2600, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $10 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $15 per session plus $1 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Austin Community College, 1600 Eighth Ave., NW, Austin, MN 55912, 507-433-0535, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $6 per credit hour, Basic Fees: 0-7 credit hours free; 8+ credit hours $15 plus, $2 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Bemidji State University, 1500 Birchmont Dr., NE, Bemidji, MN 56601, 218-755-2040, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $10 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $15 per session, Credit: yes
•Brainerd Community College, 501 West College Dr., Brainerd, MN 56401, 218-828-2508, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $10 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $15 per session plus $2 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Fergus Falls Community College, 1414 College Way, Fergus Falls, MN 56537, 218-739-7501, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $6 per credit hour, Basic Fees: 0-7 credit hours free; 8+ credit hours $15 plus $3 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Hibbing Community College, 1515 East 25th St., Hibbing, MN 55746, 218-262-6700, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $6 per credit hour, Basic Fees: 0-7 credit hours free; 8+ credit hours $15 plus $2 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Minnesota Universities - Twin Cities, Room 240, Pillsbury Dr., SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, 800-752-1000, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $6 per credit hour, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

Mississippi
•Copiah-Lincoln Community College, Financial Aid Office, P.O. Box 649, Wesson, MS 39191, 601-643-8307, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Delta State University, Registrar, Cleveland, MS 38733, 601-846-4656, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $10 for 1 course up to 3 credit hours, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•East Central Community College, Admissions, Decatur, MS 39327, 601-635-2111, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Holmes Community College, P.O. Box 369, Goodman, MS 39079, 601-472-2312, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Itawamba Community College, Admissions, 602 W. Hill St., Fulton, MS 38843, 601-862-3101, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Jones County Junior College, Guidance Office, 900 South Court St., Ellisville, MS 39437, 601-477-4025, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Meridian Community College, 910 Highway 19 North, Meridian, MS 39307, 601-483-8241, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $2.50 per class, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College: Jackson County Campus, Business Services, P.O. Box 100, Gautier, MS 39553, 601-497-9602, Minimum Age: 65 (62-64 also qualify if retired), Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

Missouri
•Crowder College, 601 LaClede Ave., Neosho, MO 64850, 417-451-3223, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $12 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•East Central College, Registration, P.O. Box 529, Union, MO 63048, 314-583-5193, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Jefferson College, Continuing Education, 1000 Viking Dr., Hillsboro, MO 63050, 314-789-3951, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $38 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $1 for a, Lifetime Card, Credit: no
•Lincoln University, 820 Chestnut St., Jefferson City, MO 65102-0029, 314-681-5000, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $12 per course, Basic Fees: $17 per session, Credit: no
•Longview Community College, 500 Longview Rd., SW, Lee's Summit, MO 64081, 816-672-2000, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Maple Woods Community College, Development Center, 2601 Northeast Barry Rd., Kansas City, MO 64156, 816-437-3050, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Missouri Southern State College, Business Office, 3950 East Newman Rd., Joplin, MO 64801-1595, 417-625-9300, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Missouri Western State College, 4525 Downs Dr., St. Joseph, MO 64507, 816-271-4200, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Moberly Area Community College, Financial Aid Office, College Ave. and Rollins St., Moberly, MO 65270, 816-263-4110, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•St. Louis Community College, Office of Admission, 11333 Big Bend Blvd., Kirkwood, MO 63122, 314-984-7601, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $40 per credit hour), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

Montana
•Dawson Community College, Business Office, 300 College Dr., Glendive, MT 59330, 406-365-3396, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none (most books can be borrowed), Credit: yes
•Flathead Valley Community College, 777 Grandview Dr., Kalispell, MT 59901, 406-756-3846, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $30.25 per credit hour, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Fort Belknap College, P.O. Box 159, Harlem, MT 59526, 406-353-2607, Minimum Age: 55 (must be a member of a federally recognized tribe), Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Fort Peck Community College, P.O. Box 398, Poplar, MT 59255, 406-768-5551, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $12 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Miles Community College, 2715 Dickinson St., Miles City, MT 59301, 406-232-3031, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Montana College of Mineral Science and Technology, 1300 West Park St., Butte, MT 59701, 406-496-4178, 800-445-8324, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: apply for waiver, Basic Fees: $26.25 for 3 credit hours; $171 for 12 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Northern Montana College, P.O. Box 7751, Havre, MT 59501, 406-265-3700, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $80.25 for 3 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Western Montana College at the University of Montana, Continuing Education, 710 South Atlantic, Dillon, MT 59725, 406-683-7537, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 1 credit hour $20 and $3 for each additional credit hour, Basic Fees: $30, Credit: yes
•University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, 406-243-0211, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: all state, supported costs waived; no discount on tuition, Basic Fees: $30 one time fee, Credit: yes
back to top

Nebraska
•Chadron State College, Admissions, 1000 Main St., Chadron, NE 69337, 308-432-6263, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: no discount on tuition, Basic Fees: $35 for 3 credit hours, Credit: yes
•McNook Community College, Registrar, 1205 East Third St., McNook, NE 69001, 308-345-6303, 800-348-5343, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Metropolita Community College, Student Accounts, P.O. Box 3777, Omaha, NE 68103, 402-449-8418, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $23 per credit hour), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Mid-Plains Community College, Accounting, 1101 Halligan Dr., North Platte, NE 69101, 308-532-8740, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $1.50 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Nebraska Indian Community College, Financial Aid Office, Mayce, NE 42837, 402-878-2414, Minimum Age: 55, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $10 one time application fee, Credit: yes
•Southeast Community College: Beatrice Campus, Adult Education, Rt. 2, Box 35A, Beatrice, NE 68310, 402-228-3468, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: no discount on tuition (regular tuition $35.25 per credit hour), Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Southeast Community College: Lincoln Campus, Cashier, 8800 O St., Lincoln, NE 68520, 402-437-2600, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: no discount on tuition; cashier: 402-437-2558, Basic Fees: varies by class, Credit: no
•Southeast Community College: Milford Campus, Student Accounts, Rt. 2, Box D, Milford, NE 68405, 402-761-2131, 800-999-7223, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: no discount on tuition, Basic Fees: varies by class, Credit: no
back to top

Nevada
•Community College of Southern Nevada, 3200 East Cheyenne Ave., North Las Vegas, NV 89030, 702-651-4060, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Northern Nevada Community College, 1500 College Parkway, Elko, NV 89801, 702-738-8493, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Truckee Meadows Community College, 7000 Dandini Blvd., Reno, NV 89512, 702-673-7000, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•University of Nevada: Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Pkwy., Las Vegas, NV 89154-1021, 702-895-3011, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•University of Nevada: Reno, Records and Enrollment Services, Reno, NV 89557, 702-784-6865, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: tuition waiver fall-spring, 50% off during summer, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Western Nevada Community College, 2201 West College Pkwy., Carson City, NV 89703, 702-887-3138, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free spring and fall only, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

New Hampshire
•New Hampshire Technical College: Berlin, 2020 Riverside Dr., Berlin, NH 03570, 603-752-1113, 800-445-4525, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $16 for 3 credit hours, Credit: yes
•New Hampshire Technical College: Claremont, One College Dr., Claremont, NH 03743, 603-542-7744, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $10 per course, Credit: yes
•New Hampshire Technical College: Manchester, 1066 Front St., Manchester, NH 03102, 603-668-6706, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•New Hampshire Technical College: Nashua, 505 Amherst St., Nashua, NH 03063, 603-882-6923
Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•New Hampshire Technical College: Stratham, Tech Dr. and Rt. 101, 277 Portsmouth Ave., Stratham, NH 03885, 603-772-1194, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•New Hampshire Technical Institute, Institute Dr., Concord, NH 03301-7412, 603-225-1800, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Notre Dame College, 2321 Elm St., Manchester, NH 03104, 603-669-4298, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free (2 course per semester limit - 6 courses per year), Basic Fees: $60 per semester, Credit: yes
•Plymouth State College of the University System of New Hampshire, Bursars, 17 High St., Plymouth, NH 03264-1600, 603-535-2237, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $35 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•School for Lifelong Learning, Learner Services, NSNH, 125 N. State St., Concord, NH 03301, 603-228-8300, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $15 per session, Credit: yes
•University of New Hampshire at Manchester, 220 Hackett Hill Rd., Manchester, NH 03102, 603-668-0700, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free up to 8 credit hours, 8 credit hours or 2 non-credit courses; no discount if courses are being taken for economic gain; space available basis, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

New Jersey
•Atlantic Community College, 5100 Black Horse Pike, Mays Landing, NJ 08330, 609-343-4922, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $20 per session, Credit: yes
•Bergen Community College, Admissions and Registration, 400 Paramus Rd., Paramus, NJ 07652, 201-447-7857, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $9.50 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $8.60 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Brookdale Community College, 765 Newman Springs Rd., Lincroft, NJ 07738, 908-842-1900, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $28 for 3 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Burlington County College, Admission, County Rt. 530, Pemberton, NJ 08068, 609-894-9311, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $65 for 3 credit hours, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Camden County College, P.O. Box 200, Blackwood, NJ 08012, 609-227-7200, Minimum Age: 62 (55 if unemployed), Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•County College of Morris, 214 Center Grove Rd., Randolf, NJ 07869, 201-328-5000, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $5 per credit hour, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Essex County College, 303 University Ave., Newark, NJ 07102, 201-877-3100, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Rowan State College, Oak Hall, Glassboro, NJ 08028, 609-256-4200, Minimum Age: 55, Tuition: free; space available basis, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Gloucester County College, Business Office, Tanyard Rd., Deptford Township, RR #4, Box 203, Sewell Post Office, NJ 08080, 609-468-5000, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $5 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $10 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Jersey City State College, 2039 Kennedy Blvd., Bursars Office, Jersey City, NJ 07305, 201-200-3234, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $73.50 for 3 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Kean College of New Jersey, 1000 Morris Ave., Union, NJ 07083, 908-527-2195, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free; space available basis, Basic Fees: $60 for 3 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Rd., Trenton, NJ 08690-1099, 609-586-0505, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free; must be resident of Mercer County, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Middlesex County College, 155 Mill Rd., P.O. Box 3050, Edison, NJ 08818, 808-906-2510, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: apply for waiver, Basic Fees: $20 per semester plus $6 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Montclair State College, Normal Ave. and Valley Rd., Upper Montclair, NJ 07043, 201-655-4136, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $25 per session, Credit: yes
•Ocean County College, College Dr., P.O. Box 2001, Toms River, NJ 08754, 908-255-0304, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $24 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $15 per semester, Credit: yes
•Ramapo College of New Jersey, 505 Ramapo Valley Rd., Mahwah, NJ 07430, 201-529-7700, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•State University of New Jersey - Rutgers, Office of University Undergraduate Admissions, Administrative Services Bldg., P.O. Box 2101, New Brunswick, NJ 08903-2101, 908-445-3770, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
back to top

New Mexico
•Clovis Community College, 417 Schepps Blvd., Clovis, NM 88101, 505-769-4025, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $13 first credit hour, $5 for each additional credit hour, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•New Mexico State College at Carlsbad, 1500 University Dr., Calrsbad, NM 88220, 505-885-8831, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $6 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $10 one time admission fee, Credit: yes
•New Mexico State University, Registrars Office, Las Cruces, NM 88003, 505-646-3121, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $25 per hour; NM residents only (6 credit hour limit in the fall), Basic Fees: $15 per semester for part-time (full-time free), Credit: yes
•New Mexico State University at Alamogordo, Admissions, P.O. Box 477, Alamogordo, NM 88311, 505-439-3600, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $8 per credit hour for in-district, $13 per credit hour out-of-district, Basic Fees: $10 one time admission fee (6 credit hour limit), Credit: yes
•New Mexico State University at Grants, 1500 North Third St., Grants, NM 87020, 505-287-7981, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $8 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $10 one time application fee, Credit: yes
•University of New Mexico, Cashier, Student Services Center, Room 140, Albuquerque, NM 87131, 505-277-5363, 800-225-5866, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $5 per credit hour (6 credit hour limit), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

New York
•Adirondack Community College, Registrar, Bay Rd., Queensbury, NY 12804, 518-743-2264, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Broome Community College, Student Accounts, P.O. Box 1017, Binghamton, NY 13902, 607-778-5000, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Cayuga County Community College, Records Office, 197 Franklin St., Auburn, NY 13021, 315-255-1743, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free; space available basis, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•City University of New York: Baruch College, P.O. Box 279, 17 Lexington Ave., New York, NY 10010, 212-802-2222, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $52 per session, Credit: yes
•City University of New York: Bronx Community College, Bursars Office, West 181st and University Ave., New York, NY 10453, 718-289-5100, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $52 per session, Credit: yes
•City University of New York: Brooklyn College, 1602 William James Hall, 2900 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11210, 718-951-5000, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $50 per session, Basic Fees: $50 per session, Credit: yes
•City University of New York: City College, Convent Ave. at 138th St., New York, NY 10031, 212-650-6977, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $52 per session, Credit: yes
•City University of New York: College of Staten Island, Registrar, 2800 Victory Blvd., Bldg. 2A-110, Staten Island, NY 10314, 718-982-2000, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $52 per session, Credit: yes
•City University of New York: Hostos Community College, Admissions, 500 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10451, 718-518-4444, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $75 per semester, Basic Fees: $52 per session, Credit: yes
•City University of New York: Hunter College, Admissions, 695 Park Ave., Room 203, North Bldg., New York, NY 10021, 212-772-4490, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $52 per session, Credit: yes
•City University of New York: Kingsborough Community College, 2001 Oriental Blvd., Brooklyn, NY 11235, 718-368-5079, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: no registration fee, Credit: yes
back to top

North Carolina
•Alamance Community College, Student Services, P.O. Box 8000, Graham, NC 27253, 910-578-2002, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Anson Community College, P.O. Box 126, Polkton, NC 28135, 704-272-7635, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $2 per quarter plus $5 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Appalachian State University, Cashier's Office, Administration Bldg., Boone, NC 28608, 704-262-2120, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free plus fees (lab, etc.), Basic Fees: $117.50 for 3 credit hours; $235 for 6 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Beaufort County Community College, P.O. Box 1069, Washington, NC 27889, 919-946-6194, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: maximum $6 activity fee per semester, Credit: yes
•Bladen Community College, P.O. Box 266, Dublin, NC 28332, 910-862-2164, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Blue Ridge Community College, College Dr., Flat Rock, NC 28731, 704-692-3572, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $1.25 per quarter, Credit: yes
•Brunswick Community College, P.O. Box 30, Supply, NC 28462, 910-754-6900, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $1.05 per quarter, Credit: yes
•Cape Fear Community College, 411 North Front St., Wilmington, NC 28401-3993, 910-343-0481, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $1 ID fee per semester, maximum $6 activity fee per semester, Credit: yes
•Carteret Community College, 3505 Arendell St., Morehead City, NC 28557, 919-247-4142, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $3.25 for 3 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Catawba Valley Community College, 2550 Highway 70, SE, Hickory, NC 28602, 704-327-7009, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $1.75 per quarter, Credit: yes
•North Carolina University - Raleigh, Adult Credit Program, Box 7401, Raleigh, NC 27695-7401, 919-515-2434, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, CB# 2200, Jackson Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, 919-966-3621, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $10 per semester, Credit: yes
back to top

North Dakota
•North Dakota State University, P.O. Box 5454, Admissions, Fargo, ND 58105, 701-231-8643, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $20 per session, Credit: no
•North Dakota State University: Bottineau and Institute of Forestry, First and Simrall Blvd., Bottineau, ND 58318, Minimum Age: 65, 701-228-2277, Minimum Age: 55, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Standing Rock College, HCI Box 4, Fort Yates, ND 58538, 701-854-3861, Tuition: free (tuition, books and fees all waived if you don't qualify for Pell Grant), Basic Fees: none (see above), Credit: yes
•University of North Dakota: Lake Region, 1801 College Dr., North, Devils Lake, ND 58301-1598, 701-662-1600, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of North Dakota: Williston, 1410 University Ave., Williston, ND 58801, 701-774-4210, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $10 per credit hour, Credit: no
•Valley City State University, 101 College St., SE, Valley City, ND 58072, 701-845-7990, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
back to top

Ohio
•Belmont Technical College, 120 Fox Shannon Pl., St. Clarisville, OH 43950, 614-695-9500, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Bowling Green State University, Department of Continuing Education, McFall Center, 40 College Park, Bowling Green, OH 43403, 419-372-2086, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free; space available basis, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Bowling Green State University - Firelands College, 901 Rye Beach Rd., Huron, OH 44839, 419-433-5560, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free; $10 registry fee, Basic Fees: $5 per semester, Credit: no
•Central Ohio Technical College, 1179 University Dr., Newark, OH 43055, 614-366-9222, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $5 per credit hour, Credit: no
•Central State University, Registrar, 1400 Brush Row Rd., Wilberforce, OH 45384, 513-376-6231, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Cuyahoga Community College District, Downtown Campus, Office of Admissions, 2900 Community College Ave., Cleveland, OH 44115, 216-987-4200, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Kent State University, P.O. Box 5190, Kent, OH 44242-0001, 216-672-2444, Minimum Age: 5O and retired or 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Ohio State University, Continuing Education, 152 Mount Hall, Columbus, OH 43210, 614-292-8860, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Akron, 381 Buchtel Common, Akron, OH 44325-2001, 216-972-7100, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free (3 course limit), Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Cincinnati, Office of Admission, P.O. Box 210091, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0091, 513-556-1100, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Toledo, Evening Session, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606-3398, 419-530-4137, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free (income limitation of $50,000 annually), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

Oklahoma
•Cameron University, Business Office, 2800 West Fore Blvd., Lawton, OK 73505, 405-581-2230, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Carl Albert State College, P.O. Box 1507 , South McLenna, Poteau, OK 74953-5208, 918-647-1200, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Connors State College, Business Office, Rt. 1, Box 1000, Warner, OK 74469, 918-463-6250, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Oklahoma Panhandle State University, P.O. Box 430, Goodwell, OK 73939, 405-349-2611, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free; space available basis only, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Oklahoma State University, 104 Whitehurse, Stillwater, OK 74078, 405-744-6858, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Oklahoma, Office of Admissions, 1000 Asp Ave., Room 127, Norman, OK 73019, 405-325-2251, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
back to top

Oregon
•Blue Mountain Community College, Continuing Education, P.O. Box 100, Pendleton, OR 97801, 503-276-1260, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $10 per credit hour, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Central Oregon Community College, Admissions, 2600 Northwest College Way, Bend, OR 97701, 541-382-6112, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 25% off (regular tuition $32 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $1.50 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Chemeketa Community College, Business Office, P.O. Box 14007, 4000 Lancaster Dr., NE, Salem, OR 97305, 503-399-5006, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 35% off (regular tuition $32 per credit hour), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Clackamas Community College, 19600 South Molalla Ave., Oregon City, OR 97045, 503-657-6958, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Clatsop Community College, Extended Learning, 1653 Jerome Ave., Astoria, OR 97103, 503-325-0910, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 50% off (another 10% for early payment-regular tuition $30 per credit hour, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Lane Community College, Admissions, 4000 East 30th Ave., Eugene, OR 97405, 541-726-2207, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $30 per credit hour), Basic Fees: none
Credit: yes
•Linn-Benton Community College, Registration, 6500 Pacific Blvd., Southwest, Albany, OR 97321-3779, 541-917-4999, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $32 per credit hour), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Mount Hood Community College, Business Office, 26000 Southeast Stark St., Gresham, OR 97030, 503-667-6422, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none (self-enrichment classes are usually $5 each plus materials), Credit: yes
•Oregon Institute of Technology, Registrar, 3201 Campus Dr., Klamath Falls, OR 97601-8801, 541-885-1150, 800-343-6653, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none to audit, Credit: no
•Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, 503-737-4411, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free to audit, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Portland Community College, Admissions, P.O. Box 19000, Portland, OR 97280-0990, 503-244-6111 ext. 4724, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $30 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $7 for full-time per quarter; $2 for part-time per quarter, Credit: yes
•Portland State University, Senior Adult Learning Center, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751, 503-725-3511, 800-547-8887, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free to audit, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
back to top

Pennsylvania
•Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, Extended Learning, 700 West Main St., Bloomsburg, PA 17815, 717-389-4420, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free; space available basis, Basic Fees: $42.50 for 3 credit hours; $304 for 12 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Bucks County Community College, Swamp Rd., Newtown, PA 18940, 215-968-8100, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $48-$57 per semester, Credit: yes
•Butler County Community College, Registrar, P.O. Box 1203, Butler, PA 16003-1203, 412-287-8711, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•California University of Pennsylvania, COPE Program, 250 University Ave., California, PA 15419, 412-938-5930, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $135 for 3 credit hours; $408 for 12 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Admissions, B-16 Carrier Hall, Clarion, PA 16214, 814-226-2306, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Community College of Beaver County, One Campus Dr., Monaca, PA 15061, 412-775-8561, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $20 per session, Credit: yes
•Pennsylvania State University, 201 Shields, University Park, PA 16802, 814-865-6528, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes (evening classes)
•University of Pennsylvania, 3440 Market St., Suite 100, Philadelphia, PA 19104, 215-898-7326, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $50 donation for 1 class; $75 donation for 2 classes, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Pittsburgh, 407 CL, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, 412-624-7308, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $15 per class, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
back to top

Rhode Island
•Community College of Rhode Island, Admissions, 400 East Ave., Warwick, RI 02886, 401-825-2285, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free; apply for waiver, Basic Fees: $15 per session, Credit: yes
•Rhode Island College, Records Office, 600 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Providence, RI 02908, 401-456-8234, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free plus registration fee, Basic Fees: $135 full-time per semester, Credit: yes
•University of Rhode Island, Financial Aid, Kingston, RI 02881-0806, 401-792-2314, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free (income limitation); apply for waiver; space available basis, Basic Fees: $96 for 3 credit hours; $619 for 12 credit hours plus $480 for insurance, which can be waived if they have comparable coverage, Credit: yes
back to top

South Carolina
•Aiken Technical College, P.O. Drawer 696, Aiken, SC 29802-0696, 803-593-9231, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Chesterfield-Marlboro Technical College, Student Development, P.O. Drawer 1007, Cheraw, SC 29520, 803-921-6900, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $14.50 per semester, Credit: yes
•The Citadel, 171 Moultri St., Charleston, SC 29409, 803-953-5000, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free; $15 registration fee, Basic Fees: $40 per semester, Credit: yes
•Clemson University, Business Affairs, G-08 Sikes Hall, P.O. Box 345307, Clemson, SC 29634-5307, 864-656-2287, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•College of Charleston, Treasurers Office, Charleston, SC 29424, 803-953-5592, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $25 per semester, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Denmark Technical College, Business Office, P.O. Box 327, Solomon Blatt Blvd., Denmark, SC 29042, 803-793-3301, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Florence-Darlington Technical College, Admissions, P.O. Box 100548, Florence, SC 29501-0548, 803-661-8151, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Francis Marion College, Financial Aid, P.O. Box 100547, Florence, SC 29501-0547, 803-661-1231, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Greenville Technical College, Admissions, P.O. Box 5616, Station B, Greenville, SC 29606-5616, 803-250-8109, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $23 per semester, Credit: yes
•Horry-Georgetown Technical College, Financial Aid, P.O. Box 1966, Conway, SC 29526, 803-347-3186, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $10 per class; $45 for computer classes, Basic Fees: $15 per session, Credit: yes
•Lander College, Admissions, P.O. Box 6007, 320 Stanley Ave., Greenwood, SC 29649, 864-229-8307, 800-768-3600, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Midlands Technical College, Admissions, P.O. Box 2408, Columbia, SC 29202, 803-738-7764, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

South Dakota
•Black Hills State University, Records and Admissions, USB 9502m, Spearfish, SD 57799-9502, 605-642-6343, 800-255-2478, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $12.86 per credit hour, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Dakota State University, Cashier, Heston Hall, Madison, SD 57042, 605-256-5139, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $12.86 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $147.33 for 3 credit hours, Credit: yes
•Northern State University, Finance Office, 1200 South Jay St., Aberdeen, SD 57401, 605-626-2544, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: 75% off (regular tuition $45.78 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $29.05 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Registrars Office, 501 East St. Joseph St., Rapid City, SD 57701-3995, 605-394-2400, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $13.25 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $15 per session, Credit: yes
•University of South Dakota, Admissions, 414 East Clark, Vermillion, SD 57069-2390, 605-677-5434, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: 75% off (regular tuition $47.18 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $15 per session, Credit: yes
back to top

Tennessee
•Austin Peay State University, Admissions, P.O. Box 4548, Clarksville, TN 37044, 615-648-7661, 800-426-2604, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $33 per credit hour not to exceed $75 per session, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Chattanooga State Technical Community College, Records Office, 4501 Amnicola Hwy., Chattanooga, TN 37406, 423-634-7702, Minimum Age: 65 (60 to audit free), Tuition: 50% of not to exceed $45 per session, Basic Fees: $12 per session, Credit: yes
•Cleveland State Community College, P.O. Box 3570, Cleveland, TN 37320, 423-472-7141, Minimum Age: 65 (60 for audit), Tuition: $16 per credit hour not to exceed $45 per session; audit free, Basic Fees: $5 per semester, Credit: yes
•Columbia State Community College, Admissions, P.O. Box 1315, Columbia, TN 38402-1315, 615-540-2722, Minimum Age: 65 (60 for audit), Tuition: $20 per session, Basic Fees: $5 one time application fee and $5 per session, Credit: yes
•Dyersburg State Community College, P.O. Box 648, Dyersburg, TN 38025-0648, 901-286-3200, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: 50% off not to exceed $50 per session, Basic Fees: $10-$28 per session, Credit: yes
•East Tennessee State University, Admissions, P.O. Box 70731, Johnson City, TN 37614, 423-929-4213, Minimum Age: 65 (60 for audit), Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $75 per semester, Credit: yes
•Jackson State Community College, Business Office, 2046 North Pkwy., Jackson, TN 38301, 901-424-3520, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $43 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $5 per session, Credit: yes
•Memphis State University, Admissions Office, Room 167, Memphis, TN 38152, 901-678-2101, 800-669-9678, Minimum Age: 65 (60 audit), Tuition: $75 per semester; audit free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Middle Tennessee State University, Accounting and Records, Murfreesboro, TN 37132, 615-898-2111, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: 50% off regular tuition, Basic Fees: $20 per session, Credit: yes
•Motlow State Community College, P.O. Box 88100, Tullahoma, TN 37388-8100, 615-393-1500, Minimum Age: 65 (60 to audit), Tuition: $20 per credit hour not to exceed $45 per session, Basic Fees: $5 per session, Credit: yes
•University of Tennessee, 451 Communication Bldg., Knoxville, TN 37996-0341, 423-974-5361, Minimum Age: 65 (60 can audit free), Tuition: $7 per credit hour not to exceed $75 per session, Basic Fees: $15 one time application fee, Credit: yes
back to top

Texas
•Alvin Community College, Records, 3110 Mustang Rd., Alvin, TX 77511-4898, 713-388-4636, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: no discount, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Amarillo College, Business Office, P.O. Box 447, Amarillo, TX 79176, 806-371-5000, Minimum Age: 65 or belong to senior citizen association, Tuition: free (some courses excluded), Basic Fees: $3 per semester, Credit: yes
•Angelina College, P.O. Box 1768, Lufkin, TX 75902, 409-639-1301, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Bee County College, Business Office, 3800 Charco Rd., Beeville, TX 78102, 512-358-3130, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Southwest Texas State University, SWT General Accounting, 601 University Dr., San Marcos, TX, 78666-4603, 512-245-2541, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free; space available basis, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Houston - Central Campus, Bursars Office, Houston, TX 77204-2160, 713-743-1096, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of North Texas, P.O. Box 13797, Denton, TX 76203, 817-565-2681, Minimum Age: senior citizen, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Texas - Austin, Office of the Registrar, Main Bldg., Room 1, Austin, TX 78712-1157, 512-471-7701, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
back to top

Utah
•Brigham Young University, BYU Evening Classes, 120 Harman Bldg., Provo, UT 84602, 801-378-2872, Minimum Age: 55, Tuition: $10 per class, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•College of Eastern Utah, 451 East 400 North, Price, UT 84501, 801-637-2120, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $10 per class, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Dixie College, The Office of the Registrar, 225 South 700 East, St. George, UT 84770, 801-673-4811 ext. 348, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $10 quarter (some classes are excluded), Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Salt Lake Community College, Admissions, 4600 South Redwood Rd., Salt Lake City, UT 84130, 801-957-4297, Minimum Age: 63, Tuition: $10 per class, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Snow College, 150 East College Ave., Ephraim, UT 84627, 801-283-4021, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $10 per quarter, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Southern Utah University, Cashiers Office, 351 West Center, Cedar City, UT 84720, 801-586-7740, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $10 per quarter, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•University of Utah, DCE, 1185 Annex, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, 801-581-8113, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $10 per quarter, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Utah State University, Registrar, Logan, UT 84322-1600, 801-797-1107, 800-662-3950, Minimum, Age: 62, Tuition: $10 per class to audit, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Utah Valley State College, Registrar, 800 West 1200 South, Orem, UT 84058, 801-222-8000, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $20 per class, Basic Fees: $20 one time admission fee, Credit: no
•Weber State University, 3750 Harrison, Ogden, UT 84408-1015, 801-626-6050, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: $10 per quarter, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
back to top

Vermont
•Castleton State College, Admissions, Castleton, VT 05735, 802-468-5611, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $19 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Community College of Vermont, Registrar, P.O. Box 120, Waterbuty, VT 05676, 802-241-3535, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $88 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $42 per semester, Credit: yes
•Johnson State College, Student Accounts, Stowe Rd., Johnson, VT 05656, 802-635-2356, 800-635-2356, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $138 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $292 per semester plus $125 in one time fees, Credit: yes
•Lyndon State College, Business Office, Lyndonville, VT 05851, 802-626-9371 ext. 163, 800-225-1998, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: 50% off (regular tuition $138 per credit hour), Basic Fees: $58.50 for 3 credit hours ($19.50 per credit hour), Credit: yes
•University of Vermont, 194 South Prospect, Burlington, VT 05401, 802-656-3170, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

Virginia
In the State of Virginia the following rule applies: If annual federal taxable income is less than $10,000, tuition and application fees are waived (audit only).
•Blue Ridge Community College, P.O. Box 80, Weyers Cave, VA 24486-9989, 540-234-9261, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Central Virginia Community College, Student Services, 3506 Wards Rd., Lynchburg, VA 24502, 804-386-4500, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Clinch Valley College of the University of Virginia, Admissions, College Ave., Wise, VA 24293, 540-328-0116, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•College of William and Mary, Bursars Office, P.O. Box 8795, Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795, 804-221-4000, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Dabney S. Lancaster Community College, Continuing Education, P.O. Box 1000, Clifton Forge, VA 24422, 540-862-4246, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Danville Community College, 1008 S. Main St., Danville, VA 24541, 804-797-3553, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Eastern Shore Community College, Student Services, Rt. 1, Box 6, Melfa, VA 23410-9755, 804-787-5912, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•George Mason University, Office of Admissions, GMU, 4400 University Dr., Fairfax, VA 22030, 703-993-2400, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Germanna Community College, Admissions, P.O. Box 339, Locust Grove, VA 22508, 540-727-3000, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•James Madison University, Student Accounts, Harrisonburg, VA 22807, 540-568-6147, Minimum, Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Northern Virginia Community College, Admissions Office, 8333 Little River Turnpike, Annandale, VA 22003, 703-323-3400, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Virginia, Charlottesville Regional Programs, Division of Continuing Education, P.O. Box 3697, Charlottesville, VA 22903, 804-982-3200, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
back to top

Washington
•Bellevue Community College, 3000 Landerholm Circle, SE, Bellevue, WA 98007, 206-641-2222, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free (2 class limit), Basic Fees: $2.50 per class, Credit: yes
•Big Bend Community College, 7662 Chanute St., Moses Lake, WA 98837, 509-762-6226, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $10 per course (2 course limit), Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Central Washington University, 400 E. 8th Ave., Ellensburg, WA 98926, 509-963-1211, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $5 per credit hour up to 6 credit hours, Basic Fees: $25 per session, Credit: no
•Centralia College, 600 West Locust, Centralia, WA 98531, 360-736-9391, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $20 (2 class limit), Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Clark College, 1800 East McLaughlin Blvd., Vancouver, WA 98663, 360-992-2000, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: $5 per class (2 class limit), Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•University of Washington, Access Program, Undergraduate Extension Office, 5001 25th Ave., NE, Seattle, WA 98195, 206-543-2320, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free plus $5 registration fee per quarter, Basic Fees: $5 per session, Credit: no
back to top

West Virginia
Apparently, Legislation has been proposed several times to no avail. We were unable to find any schools who offered a discount to senior citizens.
back to top

Wisconsin
•Chippewa Valley Technical College, 620 West Clarmont Ave., Eau Claire, WI 54701, 715-833-6244, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Madison Area Technical College, 3350 Anderson St., Madison, WI 53704-2599, 608-246-6205, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: varies ($3.50 and up non-credit only); inquire on course number, Basic Fees: varies, Credit: no
•Mid-State Technical College, 500 - 32nd St., North, Wisconsin Rapids, WI 54494-5599, 715-422-5500, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Milwaukee Area Technical College, Downtown Campus, 700 West State St., Milwaukee, WI 53233, 414-297-6600, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Northcentral Technical College, Registrar, 1000 W. Campus Dr., Wausau, WI 54401, 715-675-3331, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: reduced rate (varies), Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
•Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, Registrar's Office, P.O. Box 19043, Green Bay, WI 54307-9042, 414-498-5703, 800-272-2740, Minimum Age: 62, Tuition: up to 50% off (non-credit only), Basic Fees: none, Credit: no
back to top

Wyoming
•Casper College, 125 College Dr., Casper, WY 82601, 307-268-2110 ext. 2491, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free; must be resident of Wyoming, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes with Golden Age card
•Central Wyoming College, Continuing Education, 2660 Peck Ave., Riverton, WY 82501, 307-856-9291 ext. 181, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $11.50 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Eastern Wyoming College, Records, 3200 West C St., Torrington, WY 82240, 307-532-8334, 800-658-3195, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: $9 per credit hour, Credit: yes
•Laramie County Community College, Admissions, 1400 East College Dr., Cheyenne, WY 82007, 307-778-1212, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: $5 per credit hour, Basic Fees: $10 one time application fee, Credit: yes
•University of Wyoming, Admissions, P.O. Box 3435, Laramie, WY 82071, 307-766-5160, Minimum Age: 65, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
•Western Wyoming Community College, P.O. Box 428, Rock Springs, WY 82901, 307-382-1600, Minimum Age: 60, Tuition: free, Basic Fees: none, Credit: yes
back to top

Over 400 Programs Worth $3 Billion In State Aid For Students
There are close to 400 programs worth almost $3 billion dollars in financial aid available through all 50 states. Just because you don't have the money to pay for college, that doesn't mean your dream of a college degree will never happen. Even if you do have the money, financial assistance from one of these programs could make things a little easier for all concerned.
Did you know that there are state money programs which:
* Pay for a singing degree?
* Give you money to study wildlife?
* Give you $2000 to go to vocational school?
* Pay for your nursing, teaching, or law degree?
* Give you $7,000 to study marine sciences?
The advantage of many of these programs is that most people don't even know they exist, so your competition will be less. Each state has different requirements for their various programs, so you may need to do some checking on what specific programs might fit your needs. Some programs are exclusive to residents of a particular state, whereas others have no limitations. In addition, some programs will award money to a student, and put no limitation on what school the student chooses to attend. In some cases, for teachers or health professionals, a service requirement may exist which says that the student will practice in a particular state after graduation for a certain period of time. Contact each state below for a listing of available programs. This will allow you to shop around for the best program to suit your individual needs. By remaining flexible and adjusting your educational goals to fit the program that most appeals to you, chances are you might find yourself pursuing the college education that you always thought was beyond your reach. Using this information might be an important first step in building a successful future for yourself.
back to top

State Offices of Higher Education
Alabama
Alabama Commission on Higher Education, P.O. Box 30200, Montgomery, AL 36130-2000
334-242-2274
back to top

Alaska
Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education, 3030 Vintage Blvd., Juneau, AK 99801
907-465-2962
back to top

Arizona
Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education, 2020 North Central, Suite 275, Phoenix, AZ 85004
602-229-2590
back to top

Arkansas
Arkansas Department of Higher Education, 114 East Capitol, Little Rock, AR 72201
501-371-2000
back to top

California
California Student Aid Commission, P.O. Box 510845, Sacramento, CA 94245-0845
916-445-0880
back to top

Colorado
Colorado Commission on Higher Education, 1300 Broadway, 2nd Floor, Denver, CO 80203
303-866-2723
back to top

Connecticut
Department of Higher Education, 61 Woodland St., Hartford, CT 06105-2391
860-566-8118
back to top

Delaware
Commission on Higher Education, Carvel State Office Building, 820 N. French St., Wilmington, DE 19801
302-577-3240
Fax: 302-577-6765
back to top

District of Columbia
Office of Postsecondary Education, 2100 Martin Luther King, Jr., Ave., SE, Suite 401, Washington, DC 20020
202-727-3685
back to top

Florida
Florida Office of Student Financial Assistance, 255 Collins, Tallahassee, FL 32399-0400
850-488-1034
Fax: 850-488-3612
back to top

Georgia
Student Finance Commission, 2082 E. Exchange Place, Suite 200, Atlanta, GA 30084
770-414-3006
770-414-3224
back to top

Hawaii
Systems Group, 641-18th Ave., V201, Honolulu, HI 96816
808-733-9124
back to top

Idaho
Office of the State Board of Education, P.O. Box 83720, Boise, ID 83720-0037
208-334-2270
back to top

Illinois
Illinois Student Assistance Commission, 1755 Lake Cook Drive, Deerfield, IL 60015
708-948-8550
back to top

Indiana
State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana, 150 W. Market St., Suite 500, Indianapolis, IN 46204
317-232-2350
back to top

Iowa
Iowa College Student Aid Commission, 200 Tenth, 4th Floor, Des Moines, IA 50309-3609
515-281-3501
back to top

Kansas
Kansas Board of Regents, 700 SW Harrison, Suite 1410, Topeka, KS 66603
913-296-3517
back to top

Kentucky
Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority, 1050 U.S. 127 South, Frankfort, KY 40601
502-564-7990
back to top

Louisiana
Office of Student Financial Assistance, P.O. Box 91202, Baton Rouge, LA 70821-9202
504-922-1011
back to top

Maine
Finance Authority of Maine (FAME), Maine Education Assistance Division, 119 State House Station, One Weston Court, Augusta, ME 04333
1-800-228-3734 (In Maine)
207-626-8200
207-626-3263/2717
Fax: 207-626-8208
back to top

Maryland
Maryland Higher Education Commission, State Scholarship Administration, The Jeffrey Building, 16 Francis Street, Suite 209, Annapolis, MD 21401-1781
410-974-5370
Fax: 410-974-5994
back to top

Massachusetts
Board of Regents of Higher Education, Scholarship Office, 330 Stuart Street, Boston, MA 02116
617-727-9420
back to top

Michigan
Michigan Department of Education, Student Financial Assistance Services, Higher Education Authority, P.O. Box 30462, Lansing, MI 48909
517-373-3394
back to top

Minnesota
Minnesota Higher Education Programs, Capitol Square Building, Suite 400, 550 Cedar Street, St. Paul, MN 55101
651-296-3974
back to top

Mississippi
Mississippi Institution of Higher Education, 3825 Ridgewood Rd., Jackson, MS 39211-6453
601-982-6663
back to top

Missouri
Missouri Coordinating Board of Higher Education, P.O. Box 1438, 3515 Amazonia St., Jefferson City, MO 65109
573-751-2361
back to top

Montana
Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education, P.O. Box 20301, Helena, MT 59620-3101
406-444-6594
back to top

Nebraska
Nebraska Coordinating Commission For Postsecondary Education, 140 N. Eighth St., Suite 300, P.O. Box 95005, Lincoln, NE 68508
402-471-2847
back to top

Nevada
Nevada Department of Education, Student Incentive Grant Program, 700 E. 5th Street, Carson City, NV 98701-9050
702-687-9200
back to top

New Hampshire
New Hampshire Postsecondary Education Commission, 2 Industrial Park Drive, Concord, NH 03301
603-271-2555
back to top

New Jersey
New Jersey Department of Higher Education, Office of Student Assistance, 4 Quakerbridge Plaza, CN 540, Trenton, NJ 08625
609-588-3288
back to top

New Mexico
New Mexico Commission On Higher Education, 1068 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501
505-827-7383
back to top

New York
New York Higher Education Services Corporation, Grants and Scholarship Information, 99 Washington Ave., Albany, NY 12255
518-474-1137
back to top

North Carolina
North Carolina State Education Assistance Authority, P.O. Box 2688, Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2688
919-549-8614
Fax: 919-549-8481
back to top

North Dakota
University Systems, 600 E. Boulevard, Bismarck, ND 58505
701-328-2962
back to top

Ohio
Ohio Board of Regents, Ohio Student Aid Commission, State Grants and Scholarship Department, 309 S. 4th Street, P.O. Box 182452, Columbus, OH 43218
614-466-7420
Fax: 614-752-5903
back to top

Oklahoma
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, 500 Education Building, State Capitol Complex, Oklahoma City, OK 73105
405-524-9100
back to top

Oregon
Oregon State Scholarship Commission, 1500 Valley River Dr., Suite 100, Eugene, OR 97401
503-687-7400
back to top

Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency, 1200 N. 7th Street, Harrisburg, PA 17102
717-720-2850
back to top

Rhode Island
Rhode Island Higher Education Assistance Authority, 560 Jefferson Boulevard, Warwick, RI 02886
401-736-1100
back to top

South Carolina
South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 1333 Main Street, Suite 200, Columbia, SC 29201
803-737-2260
back to top

South Dakota
South Dakota Department of Education And Cultural Affairs, Office of the Secretary, 7000 Governors Drive, Pierre, SD 57051
605-773-3134
back to top

Tennessee
Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation, 404 James Robertson Parkway, Suite 1950, Parkway Towers, Nashville, TN 37243-0820
615-741-1346
back to top

Texas
Texas Coordinating Board on Higher Education, Box 12788, Capitol Station, Austin, TX 78711-2788
512-483-6100
back to top

Utah
Utah System of Higher Education, 355 West North Temple, 3 Triad, Suite 550, Salt Lake City, UT 84180-1205
801-321-7100
back to top

Vermont
Vermont Student Assistance Corporation, P.O. Box 2000, Champlain Mill, Winooski, VT 05404
800-798-8722
802-655-4050
back to top

Virginia
Virginia State Council of Higher Education, Office of Financial Aid, James Monroe Building, 101 North 14th St., 10th Floor, Richmond, VA 23219
804-786-4690
Fax: 804-225-2604
back to top

Washington
Higher Education Coordinating Board, 917 Lakeridge Way, P.O. Box 43430, Olympia, WA 98504
360-753-7800
back to top

West Virginia
West Virginia Higher Education Program, 1018 Kanawha Blvd. East, Suite 700, Charleston, WV 25301
304-558-4614
back to top

Wisconsin
State of Wisconsin Higher Educational Aids Board, P.O. Box 7885, Madison, WI 53707-7885
608-267-2206
back to top

Wyoming
Wyoming Department of Higher Education, Hathaway Building, Cheyenne, WY 82002
307-777-6213
back to top

How To Get A GED and More Adult Education
People drop out of or fail to complete high school for many different reasons. But one thing is clear; getting your high school diploma or GED is the key to advancement. You can join the privileged ranks of people like Bill Cosby, Mary Lou Retton, and 10 million other people famous and not so famous who have obtained their GED. What is a GED and how do you get one? GED stands for General Educational Development. When you take a GED test, it tests your knowledge and ability in five different areas: writing skills, social studies, science, interpreting literature and the arts, and mathematics. This is a way for you to earn your GED diploma which you can then use to apply for jobs, enter training programs, or even attend college! GED tests are given at sites all across the United States. There are several ways to learn where the nearest GED test site is located. You can contact your local Board of Education, your State Department of Adult Education, or the GED Information Hotline at 800-62-MY-GED. This hotline is operated by the American Council on Education (P.O. Box 81826, Lincoln, NE 68501) which administers the GED tests. You can take the GED without studying if you feel prepared. However, many people who have been out of school for awhile may need a little time to study. There are different ways to do this. Your local library or bookstore offers a variety of GED study books, many of which come with practice tests. The GED hotline listed above can also provide you with information on how to purchase a practice test. Many local school boards, community organizations, and community colleges offer adult education courses. Your local public television station may also run programs to help you study for the test. Another wonderful resource is the National Literacy Hotline at 800-228-8813 (Contact Center, P.O. Box 81826, Lincoln, NE 68501). This hotline maintains a database of resources and organizations that focus on literacy and can connect you to literacy resources and contacts in your area.
back to top


Other Resources:
Clearinghouse on Adult Education and Literacy
400 Maryland Ave., SW
Washington, DC 20202
202-205-9996
This clearinghouse can direct you to state contacts for assistance and has publications which review different types of training and education programs.
back to top

ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career and Vocational Education
Ohio State University
Center on Education and Training for Employment
1900 Kenny Rd.
Columbus, OH 43210
614-292-4353
800-848-4815
This clearinghouse has literature and relevant materials covering the topics of adult and continuing education, ranging from basic literacy training through professional skill upgrading. They can conduct a database search for materials on a specific subject of interest and have a publications list of resource summaries.
back to top

Literacy Assistance
Most of us learned the basics - reading, writing, and math - in school. But there are millions of Americans who never learned how to read, much less mastered any of the other fundamental skills necessary to survive in the world today. Without the ability to read, one can't check the want ads, fill out a job application, or attempt to take a job placement test. The road to literacy is never easy, but it's even more difficult as you get older. It takes a great deal of time and effort to achieve your goal of literacy, but reading is the only way to get ahead. There are many ways to learn what you missed in high school. Nonprofits across this country have been established to deal with illiteracy. They have programs throughout the United States where volunteers work one on one with participants to improve their reading and math skills. The National Literacy Hotline at 800-228-8813 is designed to put callers in touch with literacy programs close by. You may also contact some of the nonprofits listed below to help a loved one learn to read and enjoy a more satisfying life.
* Literacy Volunteers of America, 5795 Widewaters Parkway, Syracuse, NY 13214; 315-445-8000.
* Reading is Fundamental, Smithsonian Institution, 600 Maryland Ave. SW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20560; 202-287-3220.
* National Institute for Literacy, 800 Connecticut Ave., NW, Suite 200, Washington, DC 20202; 202-632-1500.
* Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy, 1002 Wisconsin Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20007; 202-338-2006.
The Federal government supports programs as well. The local board of education may provide classes, as may the nearest community college. The following is a list of state Adult Education Directors. Contact the Director for your state if you are having trouble locating the services you need, or you may contact the headquarters at Clearinghouse on Adult Education and Literacy, Division of Adult Education and Literacy, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20202; 202-205-9996.
back to top

Adult Education Directors
Alabama
Mr. Bobby B. Dees
State Administrator
GED Testing Program
Adult Basic Education Section
Division of Federal Administrative Services
Department of Education
Gordon Persons Building, Room 5343
50 North Ripley St.
Montgomery, AL 36130
334-242-8181
Fax: 334-242-2236
back to top

Alaska
Ms. Constance Munro, State Supervisor
Adult Basic Education
Department of Education
801 West 10th, Box F
Juneau, AK 99801
907-465-8714
Fax: 907-465-3396
back to top

American Samoa
Ms. Fa'au'uga Achica
Dean of Continuing and Adult Education
American Samoa Community College
Board of Higher Education
Mapusaga Campus
Pago Pago, AS 96799
011-684-699-9155
Fax: 011-684-699-2062
back to top

Arizona
Dr. Gary A. Eyre
State Administrator
Adult Education Services
Department of Education
1535 West Jefferson
Phoenix, AZ 85007
602-542-5280
Fax: 602-542-1849
back to top

Arkansas
Mr. Garland Hankins
Deputy Director
Adult Education Section
Department of Education
Luther S. Hardin Building, #506
Third Capitol Mall
Little Rock, AR 72201-1083
501-682-1970/1978
Fax: 501-682-1982
back to top

California
Dr. Gerald Kilbert
State Director
Adult Education
Department of Education
P.O. Box 944272
Sacramento, CA 94244-2720
916-322-6535
Fax: 916-327-4239
back to top

Colorado
Ms. Dian Bates
State Director, ABE
Division of Adult Education
201 E. Colfax Ave.
Denver, CO 80203
303-866-6611
Fax: 303-830-0793
back to top

Connecticut
Ms. Roberta Pawloski
Director, Division of Vocational Technical and Adult Education
Department of Education
25 Industrial Park Rd.
Middletown, CT 06457
203-638-4035
Fax: 203-638-4156/4062
back to top

Delaware
Dr. Fran Tracy-Mumford
State Supervisor
Adult and Community Education
Department of Public Instruction
P.O. Box 1402
J.G. Townsend Building
Dover, DE 19901
302-739-4681
Fax: 302-739-3744
back to top

District of Columbia
Dr. Otho E. Jones
Assistant Superintendent
District of Columbia Public Schools
Browne Administrative Unit
26th and Benning Rd., NE
Washington, DC 20002
202-724-4178
Fax: 202-724-4750
back to top

Federated States of Micronesia
Dr. Catalino L. Cantero
Secretary, Department of Education
P.O. Box P.S. 87
Palikir, Pohnpei, FM 96941
011-691-320-2609
Fax: 11-691-320-5510
back to top

Florida
Dr. John E. Lawrence, Chief
Bureau of Adult and Community Education
FEC Building
Department of Education
325 W. Gains St., Room 1244
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0400
850-487-4929
Fax: 850-487-6259
back to top

Georgia
Dr. Jean DeVard-Kemp
Assistant Commissioner for Adult Literacy
Department of Technical and Adult Education
1800 Centary Place
Atlanta, GA 30345-4304
404-679-1635
Fax: 404-679-1630
back to top

Guam
Mr. John T. Cruz, Director
Occupational Education Services, Academic Education Services and Student Services
Guam Community College
P.O. Box 23069
Main Postal Facility
Guam, 96921
011-671-734-4311
Fax: 011-671-734-5238
back to top

Hawaii
Mr. Kenneth Yamamoto
Administrator, Youth and Early Childhood Section
Department of Education
Hahaione Elementary School
595 Pepeekeo St., H-2
Honolulu, HI 96825
808-395-9451
Fax: 808-395-1826
back to top

Idaho
Dr. Shirley Spencer
Director, A.E.
Department of Education
Len B. Jordon Office Building
650 W. State St.
Boise, ID 83720
208-334-2187
Fax: 208-334-2228
back to top

Illinois
Mrs. Noreen Lopez, Director, A.E.
Adult, Vocational and Technical Education
State Board of Education
100 N. First St., E-439
Springfield, IL 62777
217-782-3370
Fax: 217-782-9224
back to top

Indiana
Ms. Carlotta Anderson
Director, Division of Adult Education
Department of Education
Room 229, State House
Indianapolis, IN 46204
317-232-0522
Fax: 317-232-9121
back to top

Iowa
Mr. Donald L. Wederquist
Chief, Adult Education
Department of Education
Grimes State Office Building
Des Moines, IA 50319-0146
515-281-3671
Fax: 515-242-5988
back to top

Kansas
Ms. Janet Stotts
Director, Adult Education
Department of Education
120 East 10th St.
Topeka, KS 66612
913-296-3191
Fax: 913-296-7933
back to top

Kentucky
Ms. Teresa Suter
Office Head
Adult Education Services
Department for Adult and Technical Education
Capital Plaza Tower, 3rd Floor
500 Mero St.
Frankfort, KY 40601
502-564-5114
Fax: 502-564-5316
back to top

Louisiana
Mr. Glenn Gossett
Director, Bureau of Adult and Community Education
Department of Education
P.O. Box 94064
Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9064
504-342-3510
Fax: 504-342-7316
back to top

Maine
Dr. Paul (Randy) Walker, Director
Adult and Community Education
Department of Education
State House Station 23
Augusta, ME 04333
207-289-5854
Fax: 207-287-5894
back to top

Maryland
Mr. Charles Talbert, Director
Adult Education and Literacy Services Branch
Division of Career Technology and Adult Learning, 3rd Floor
Maryland State Department of Education
200 West Baltimore St.
Baltimore, MD 21201
410-767-0162
Fax: 410-333-2379
back to top

Massachusetts
Mr. Robert Bickerton, Director
Adult and Community Service
Department of Education
350 Main St., 4th Floor
Malden, MA 02148
617-388-3300, ext. 353
Fax: 617-388-3394
back to top

Michigan
Dr. Ronald M. Gillum, Director
Adult Extended Learning Services
Department of Education
P.O. Box 30008
Lansing, MI 48909
517-373-8425
Fax: 517-335-3630
back to top

Minnesota
Mr. Brian Kanes, Coordinator
Adult Basic Education
Department of Education
997 Capitol Square Building
550 Cedar St.
St. Paul, MN 55101
651-296-8311
Fax: 615-297-5695
back to top

Mississippi
Ms. Eloise Johnson
Director of Literacy
State Board for Community and Junior Colleges
Education and Research Center
3825 Ridgewood Rd.
Jackson, MS 39211
601-982-6344
Fax: 601-359-2326
back to top

Missouri
Mr. Elvin Long
Director, Adult Education
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
P.O. Box 480
Jefferson City, MO 65102
314-751-0887
Fax: 314-751-1179
back to top

Montana
Dr. Robert Ruthemeyer
Director, Adult Education
State Office of Public instruction
Office of the State Superintendent
State Capitol Building
Helena, MT 59602
406-444-4443
Fax: 406-444-3924
back to top

Nebraska
Mr. Burney Bouslough
Director, Adult and Community Education
Department of Education
301 Centennial Mall South
P.O. Box 94987
Lincoln, NE 68509
402-471-4807
Fax: 402-471-0117
back to top

Nevada
Ms. Phyllis Rich
Adult Basic Education Consultant
State GED Administrator
Department of Education
Adult and Continuing Education
400 W. King St.
Capitol Complex
Carson City, NV 89710
702-687-3134
Fax: 702-687-5660
back to top

New Hampshire
Mr. Art Ellison
Supervisor, ABE
Department of Education
101 Pleasant St.
Concord, NH 03301
603-271-6698
Fax: 603-271-1953
back to top

New Jersey
Mr. Harry Van Houten
Director, A.E.
Department of Education
225 West State St.
Trenton, NJ 08625-0500
609-777-0577
Fax: 609-633-9825
back to top

New Mexico
Ms. Muriel Lawler
State Director, ABE
Department of Education
Education Building
300 Don Gaspar
Santa Fe, NM 87501
505-827-6672
Fax: 505-827-6696
back to top

New York
Mr. Garrett W. Murphy
Director, Division of Continuing Education
State Education Department
Washington Ave.
Albany, NY 12234
518-474-5808
Fax: 518-474-2801
back to top

North Carolina
Mr. Bobby Anderson
Director, Continuing Education
Department of Community Colleges
200 West Jones
Raleigh, NC 27063-1337
919-733-4791
Fax: 919-733-0680
back to top

North Dakota
Mr. G. David Massey
Director, Adult Education
Department of Public Instruction
600 Boulevard Ave. East
9th Floor, State Capitol Building
Bismarck, ND 58505-0440
701-224-2393/3600
Fax: 701-224-2461
back to top

Northern Mariana Islands
Ms. Fe Calixterio
Director, Adult Education
Northern Marianas College
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
Box 1250
Saipan, MP 96950
011-670-234-3690
Fax: 011-670-234-0759
back to top

Ohio
Mr. James A. Bowling
State Director, Adult Education
Department of Education
933 High St., Suite 210
Worthington, OH 43085-4087
614-466-5015
Fax: 614-752-1640 (466-2372)
back to top

Oklahoma
Mr. Al Underwood
Director, Lifelong Learning
Department of Education
Oliver Hodge Memorial Education Building
2500 N. Lincoln Blvd., Room 180
Oklahoma City, OK 73105-4599
405-521-3321
Fax: 405-521-6205
back to top

Oregon
Dr. Donna M. Lane
Assistant Commissioner, Office of Community College Services
255 Capitol St., NE
Salem, OR 97310
503-378-8585
Fax: 503-378-8434
back to top

Palau
Mr. Masa-Aki N. Emesiochi
Grant Coordinator
Chief, Division of Curriculum
Public School System
Department of Social Services
P.O. Box 189
Koror, Palau 96940
011-6809-488-2570
Fax: 011-6809-488-2570
back to top

Pennsylvania
Ms. Cheryl Keenan
Director, Bureau of Adult, Basic and Literacy Education
Department of Education
333 Market St., 6th Floor
Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333
717-787-5532
Fax: 717-783-5420
back to top

Puerto Rico
Ms. Carmen Venlen Rivera
Assistant Secretary for Adult Education
Educational Extension
P.O. Box 759
Hato Rey, PR 00919
809-753-9211
Fax: 809-754-0843
back to top

Republic of the Marshall Islands
Ms. Biram Stege
State Director
Republic of the Marshall Islands
College of the Marshall Islands
Majuro, Marshall Islands 96960
011-692-625-3394
Fax: 011-692-625-3538
back to top

Rhode Island
Mr. Robert Mason
Adult Education Specialist
Department of Education
22 Hayes St., Room 222
Roger Williams Building
Providence, RI 02908
401-277-2705
Fax: 401-277-6033
back to top

South Carolina
Mr. Sam Drew
State Director
Office of Community Education
South Carolina Department of Education
1429 Senate St.
403 Rutledge Office Building
Columbia, SC 29201
803-734-8563
Fax: 803-734-8624
back to top

South Dakota
Mr. Gene K. Dickson
Adult Education
Office of Adult, Vocational and Technical Education
700 Governors Dr.
Pierre, SD 57501-2291
605-773-4716
Fax: 605-773-6139
back to top

Tennessee
Mr. Phil White
Executive Director
Division of Adult and Community Education
Department of Education
1130 Menzler Rd.
Nashville, TN 37210
615-741-7054
Fax: 615-741-6236
back to top

Texas
Dr. Pavlos Roussos
Program Director
Adult Education
Division of A.E./Employment
Training, Funding and Compliance
Texas Education Agency
1701 North Congress Ave.
Austin, TX 78701
512-463-9294
Fax: 512-475-3575
back to top

Utah
Dr. Brent Gubler
Specialist
Adult Education Services
Office of Education
250 East 500 South St.
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
801-538-7844
Fax: 801-538-7521
back to top

Vermont
Ms. Sandra Robinson
Chief, Adult Education Unit
Department of Education
State Office Building
Montpelier, VT 05602
802-828-3131
Fax: 802-828-3140
back to top

Virginia
Dr. Lennox L. McLendon
Associate Director, A.E.
Department of Education
Commonwealth of Virginia
P.O. Box 6Q
Richmond, VA 23216
804-225-2075
Fax: 804-371-8593
back to top

Virgin Islands
Ms. Anna C. Lewis
Director, ABE
Department of Education
P.O. Box 6640
St. Thomas, VI 00801
809-774-5394
Fax: 809-774-4679
back to top

Washington
Dr. Patricia Green, Director
Office of Adult Literacy
State Board for Community and Technical Colleges
P.O. Box 42495
Olympia, WA 98504-2495
206-664-9402
Fax: 206-664-8808
back to top

West Virginia
Ms. Kathi Polis
Assistant Director, A.E.
Department of Education
Building 6, Room 230
Capitol Complex
1900 Kanawha Blvd., East
Charleston, WV 25305
304-558-6318
Fax: 304-558-0048
back to top

Wisconsin
Mr. Dwight A. York
State Director, Vocational, Technical and Adult Education
Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult State and Adult Education
310 Price Place
P.O. Box 7874
Madison, WI 53707
608-266-1207
back to top

Wyoming
Mr. Lloyd Kjornes
Coordinator
Adult Education
Hathaway Building
Cheyenne, WY 82002
307-777-6228
Fax: 307-777-6234
back to top

How To Make A High School Diploma Worth More
The School-to-Work program provides money to states and local partnerships of business, labor, government, education, and community organizations to develop school-to-work systems. School-to-Work is based on the concept that education works best and is most useful for future careers when students apply what they learn to real life, real work situations. School-to-Work has three core elements: School-based learning, Work-based learning, and Connecting activities. School-to-Work looks different in each state and locality. Contact your state office to learn more. State offices can be contacted from the list below; or National School-To-Work Learning and Information Center, 400 Virginia Ave., SW, Room 210, Washington, DC 20024; 800-251-7236; {www.stw.ed.gov}.
back to top
School-to-Work Grantees
Alabama
Center for Commerce, Room 424, 401 Adams Ave., Suite 380, Montgomery, AL 36103, 334-242-5300, www.noicc.gov
back to top

Alaska
Alaska Department of Education, 801 W. 10th St., Suite 200, Juneau, AK 99801, 907-465-8726, E-mail: {Sally_Saddler@educ.state.ak.us}.
back to top

Arizona
Arizona Department of Commerce, STW Division, 3800 North Central Ave., Building D, Phoenix, AZ 85012, 602-280-8130, www.state.az.us/commerce
back to top

Arkansas
Arkansas Career Opportunities Initiative, Department of Workforce, 3 Capitol Mall, Room 506D, Little Rock, AR 72201, 501-682-1579
back to top

California
Department of Education High School Division, Assistant Superintendent and Director, 721 Capitol Mall, 4th Floor, Sacramento, CA 94244, 916-657-2532
back to top

Colorado
Colorado School-to-Career Partnership, 1580 Logan St., Suite 410, Denver, CO 80203, 303-894-2060, www.state.co.us/gov_dir/ltgov/schooltowork/index.html
back to top

Connecticut
Connecticut State Department of Education, Acting Associate Commissioner of Education, 25 Industrial Park Rd., Middletown, CT 06457, 860-807-2005
back to top

Delaware
Delaware Department of Public Instruction, Vocational-Technical Education & STW Transition, Townsend Building, Federal & Lockerman Streets, Dover, DE 19901, 302-739-4638
back to top

District of Columbia
DC Public Schools, Corporation and Community Relations, 825 N. Capitol, NE, 8th Floor, Room 8144, Washington, DC 20002, 202-442-5155
back to top

Florida
Florida Department of Education, 325 West Gaines St., Unit 754, Tallahassee, FL 32399, 850-488-7394
back to top

Georgia
Workforce Development Initiatives, Georgia Department of Technical & Adult Education, 1800 Century Place, Suite 400, Atlanta, GA 30345, 404-679-1658
back to top

Hawaii
Hawaii School-to-Work Opportunities, State Executive Director, 874 Dillingham Blvd., Honolulu, HI 96817, 808-845-9432, www.hdo.k12.hi.us/stwo
back to top

Idaho
Idaho School-to-Work, Executive Director, 650 W. State St., Suite 300, P.O. Box 83720, Boise, ID 83720, 208-332-6928, http://netnow.micron.net/~stw/index.html
back to top

Illinois
Office of the Governor, 107 Stratton Building, Springfield, IL 62706, 217-782-1145
back to top

Indiana
Department of Workforce Development, State STW Director, 10 N. Senate Ave., SE, Room 302, Indiana Government Center, Indianapolis, IN 46204, 317-232-1832, www.dwd.state.in.us
back to top

Iowa
Workforce Development Administrative Center, Grimes State Office Building, 3rd Floor, Des Moines, IA 50319, 515-242-5611
back to top

Kansas
Kansas State Department of Education, Coordinator, School-to-Careers, 120 SE 10th Ave., Topeka, KS 66612, 785-296-3915
back to top

Kentucky
Executive Director, Berry Hill Annex, 700 Louisville Rd., Frankfort, KY 40601, 502-564-5901, www.state.ky.us/agencies/wforce/
back to top

Louisiana
Office of Lifelong Learning, School-to-Work Liaison, P.O. Box 94004, Baton Rouge, LA 70804, 504-342-2094, www.leeric.lsu.edu/stw
back to top

Maine
Department of Education, Workforce Education and School-to-Work Opportunities, 23 State House Station, Augusta, ME 04333, 207-287-5854
back to top

Maryland
Department of Education, Assistant State Superintendent, 200 West Baltimore St., Baltimore, MD 21201, 410-767-0157
back to top

Massachusetts
Massachusetts Office for School-to-Work Transition, 350 Main St., Malden, MA 02148, 781-388-3300 ext. 311, www.stw.bssc.org
back to top

Michigan
Michigan Jobs Commission, Office of Workforce Development, 201 North Washington Square, Victor Office Center, Fifth Floor, Lansing, MI 48913, 517-335-5858, www.mjc.state.mi.us
back to top

Minnesota
Minnesota Department of Children, Families and Learning, Office of Lifework Development, 1500 Highway 36 West, Roseville, MN 55113, 651-582-8427, http://children.state.mn.us
back to top

Mississippi
Mississippi Department of Education, Central High School Building, 359 North West St., Jackson, MS 39205, 601-359-1737
back to top

Missouri
Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Assistant Director, School-to-Work, P.O. Box 480, Jefferson City, MO 65102, 573-751-4192
back to top

Montana
Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education, Director for Workforce Development, 2500 Broadway, Helena, MT 59620, 406-444-0316, www.montan.edu/wochesw/docs/webpage.html
back to top

Nebraska
Nebraska Alliance for Learning, STW Director, 301 Centennial Mall South, Lincoln, NE 68509, 402-471-3741, www.ded.state.ne.us/stw/stw.html
back to top

Nevada
Nevada Department of Education, State School-to-Careers Coordinator, 700 E. Fifth St., Carson City, NV 89701, 775-687-9243
back to top

New Hampshire
Department of Education, Educational Consultant, 101 Pleasant St., Concord, NH 03301, 603-271-3729
back to top

New Jersey
New Jersey Department of Education, Office of School-to-Work Initiatives, 100 Riverview Plaza, Trenton, NJ 08625, 609-633-0665, www.state.nj.us.gov.educ
back to top

New Mexico
Office of the Governor, Governor's Education Policy Advisor/STW Coordinator, State Capitol Bldg., Suite 400, Santa Fe, NM 87503, 505-827-3078, www.edd.state.nm.us/ST
back to top

New York
New York State Education Department, Assistant Commissioner, Workforce Preparation and Continuing Education, 89 Washington Ave., Room 319 EB, Albany, NY 12234, 518-474-8892, www.nysed.gov/workforce/work.html
back to top

North Carolina
Commission on Workforce Preparedness, School-to-Work Transition, 116 West Jones St., Raleigh, NC 27603, 919-715-3300
back to top

North Dakota
North Dakota/STW Opportunities System, State Capitol, 15th Floor, Bismarck, ND 58505, 701-328-3074
back to top

Ohio
Ohio School-to-Work, 131 North High St., Suite 500, Columbus, OH 43215, 614-728-4630, www.ohio-stw.com
back to top

Oklahoma
Department of Vocational and Technical Education, State Coordinator, 1500 West Seventh Ave., Stillwater, OK 74074, 405-743-5158, www.okvotech.org
back to top

Oregon
Oregon Department of Education, Coordinator, School-to-Work Teams, 255 Capitol St., NE, Salem, OR 97310, 503-378-3584 Ext. 350
back to top

Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania Dept. of Education, School-to-Work Opportunities Liaison, 333 Market St., 5th Floor, Harrisburg, PA 17126, 717-772-4177
back to top

Rhode Island
Rhode Island School-to-Work Director, 610 Manton Ave., 3rd Floor, Providence, RI 02909, 401-222-4922
back to top

South Carolina
Office of the Governor, STW Coordinator, 1429 Senate St., Room 912A, Columbia, SC 29201, 803-734-8410
back to top

South Dakota
Department of Labor, STW Coordinator, 700 Governors Dr., Pierre, SD 57501, 605-773-5017, www.state.sd.us/dol/jtpa/stw.htm
back to top

Tennessee
Department of Education, Executive Director, 710 James Robertson Pkwy, 6th Floor, Nashville, TN 37243, 615-532-5942, www.state.tn.us/education/stchpage.html
back to top

Texas
Texas Workforce Commission, Research Specialist III, STW Coordinator, 1117 Trinity St., Room 326T, Austin, TX 787778, 512-936-3267
back to top

Utah
Utah State Office of Education, Coordinator, School to Careers, 250 East 500 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84111, 801-538-7850
back to top

Vermont
Vermont Department of Employment and Training, 5 Green Mountain Dr., P.O. Box 488, Montpelier, VT 05601, 802-828-4301, www.det.state.vt.us
back to top

Virginia
Virginia Business-Education Partnership, 100-101 North 9th St., Fifth Floor, Richmond, VA 23219, 804-692-0244, www.state.va.us/vbep
back to top

Washington
Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, Secondary Education and Career Preparation, Old Capitol Building, 600 Washington St., SE, Olympia, WA 98504, 360-753-2062, www.wa.gov/wtb
back to top

West Virginia
Director, 1900 Kanawha Blvd., East, Building 6, Room 235, Charleston, WV 25305, 304-558-2389
back to top

Wisconsin
Department of Workforce Development, Connecting Education & Work, Division Administrator, 201 E. Washington Ave., Room 231X, Madison, WI 53702, 608-266-0223
back to top

Wyoming
Office of Workforce Development, Herschler Building, 122 W. 25th St., Cheyenne, WY 82002, 307-777-7639
back to top

Check Your State For Training Money and Help
Each and every state also has a number of training programs that can provide money and help for people of any age looking to get the job they always wanted. For example, Maine has a program that trains people who are not eligible for any other program. Massachusetts provides tuition to attend college classes. Alabama works one-on-one to get people trained on how to get the job they want. California even trains people to work for themselves. To see what your state has to offer, review the listings below, and be sure to contact your state Department of Labor listed in the Appendix, so you can see what new programs are being offered.
State Job Training Programs

Alabama
•Alabama Industrial Development Training
Alabama Industrial Development Training (AIDT)
One Technology Court
Montgomery, AL 36116-3200
334-242-4158
Fax: 334-242-0299
TDD: 334-242-0298
Alabama Industrial Development Training (AIDT) is a state-funded education institution established to develop and coordinate training programs for companies that are creating jobs in Alabama. They recruit and assist companies in selecting Alabama residents for enrollment in training programs. Training programs average 60 to 80 hours in length. Trainees usually attend a three to four hour training session on two nights a week for about ten weeks. Training sessions may be conducted at the company receiving the training, in AIDT mobile training units, in classrooms and labs at one of AIDT's three training centers in Huntsville, Montgomery and Mobile, or at a local community college.
•Veterans Benefits
Department of Veterans Affairs
P.O. Box 1509
Montgomery, AL 36102-1509
334-242-5077
Fax: 334-242-5102
Preference in State Classified Employment: All persons who have been honorably discharged from the US Armed Forces at any time shall have five points added to any earned ratings in examination for entrance to the state classified service. Those honorably discharged and entitled to pension, compensation, or disability allowance under existing laws shall have 10 points added to any earned ratings. Wives and widows of certain disabled or deceased veterans may have the 10 point preference extended to them and added to any earned ratings.
•Educational Benefits: This program is administered by the Alabama Department of Veterans Affairs and veterans must meet certain qualifications to establish eligibility for his/her dependents. Programs offered include the American Legion and Auxiliary Scholarship Program and the Disabled American Veterans Scholarship Program. Complete details can be obtained by contacting the office listed above.
back to top

Alaska
•State Training and Employment Program (STEP)
Katherine A. Brown, Grants Administrator
Division of Community and Rural Development
Department of Community and Regional Affairs
P.O. Box 112100 (150 Third St., Room 111)
Juneau, AK 99811-2100
907-465-4863
Fax: 907-465-3212
The State Training and Employment Program (STEP) attempts to prevent future claims against unemployment benefits by: attracting new business due to an available skilled labor force and lower employer unemployment insurance costs; training or retraining workers for new or emerging industries and technologies; and promoting local hire. STEP is funded by 1/10% of employee contributions to the Unemployment Insurance (UI) Trust Fund. These contributions are deposited in a special account within the state general fund. Persons are eligible who are unemployed and receiving unemployment insurance benefits, or who have exhausted their UI benefits; are employed but likely to lose their job within 6 months due to the job's elimination; or due to obsolescence of their job skills; or have worked in a job covered by unemployment insurance during the last 3 years but are ineligible for benefits because the job was seasonal, temporary, part-time, or wage contributions were insufficient, or due to underemployment. These programs are typically conducted in classrooms or other institutional settings; foster economic development in high growth industry; and are tailored to meet specific needs of a particular employer or group of employers. The employer must commit to hiring those who successfully complete training.
back to top

Arizona
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Program
3221 North 16th St., Suite 302
Phoenix, AZ 85016
602-640-2964
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1 to 6 years. Most trades require 3 to 4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Veterans Benefits
Veterans Service Commission
Veterans Service Division
3225 North Central Ave., Suite 509
Phoenix, AZ 85012-2409
602-255-4183
Fax: 602-255-1038
Tuition and Fees-Deferred Payment: A veteran or eligible dependent who has applied for education benefits under the GI Bill at state-supported community colleges. Colleges and universities may defer payment of tuition, fees and required books for a period of 120 days with no interest charges. If, at the end of such period, the person has not received from the US Department of Veterans Affairs the initial benefit monies for tuition and fees, an extension may be granted until such time benefits are received.
Employment Preferences: An honorably discharged veteran shall be eligible for employment preference, rights, and privileges under any merit system in the state or any political subdivisions thereof, regardless of age, if otherwise qualified.
•Work Force Recruitment and Job Training Grant Program
Job Training Manager
Arizona Department of Commerce
3800 North Central, Suite 1500
Phoenix, AZ 85012
602-280-1352
Fax: 602-280-1301
This state funded program provides business with grants for short-term customized, job and business specific training for new employees. The Department administers the program but works with training providers such as community colleges, private post-secondary institutions, and trade schools. Businesses must maintain or exceed current level of training expenditures and attempt to leverage other training resources. Eligible costs include: recruitment, screening, intake, assessment, interviewing, training design, materials design and accession, trainer costs, equipment, management and administration of training project and travel (not to exceed 10% of project). Ineligible costs are trainee wages and fringe benefits, and basic skills training. Selection is based on: number of new jobs created, location of business, average wages for new employees, total cost of training, training cost per employee, amount of business matching funds, use of local labor force, use of target groups, employee benefit package, financial well-being of business, and community support for the project. Start-up financing for new business ventures is not available. Eligible companies must have a profitable operating history of at least 2 years.
back to top

Arkansas
•Arkansas Industrial Coordinator Program
Vocational and Technical Education Division
Arkansas Department of Education
Three Capitol Mall
Luther Hardin Building
Little Rock, AR 72201-1083
501-682-1505
Fax: 501-682-1509
This program was developed out of research and in-depth analysis conducted by the Vocational, Adult and Technical Education Division. The network of 14 Coordinators act as training brokers with specific responsibilities for: developing and maintaining direct contact with business and industry within a multi-county area; promoting, developing and coordinating specialized training programs; keeping industry informed of the training available from public and state supported secondary and post-secondary educational and training institutions; and maintaining economical and industrial data to serve as a basis for long-range planning.
Arkansas Industry Training Program
Arkansas Industrial Development Commission
One Capitol Mall
Little Rock, AR 72201
501-682-1302
Fax: 501-682-1188
The primary function of the Arkansas Industry Training Program (AITP) is to offer pre-employment training, free of charge, to companies and to underemployed and unemployed persons in Arkansas. Trainees are not paid while in training. On-the-job training is offered if the equipment is too large, unique, or proprietary to set up in a training area. Training takes place in the community in which the company locates. Classes may be held in an educational institution, at the company site, in a donated community site, or a leased AITP facility. Classes are normally conducted at night, 3 to 4 hours a night, 3 to 4 nights a week, for 3 to 15 weeks. AITP provides training for possible jobs; it does not subsidize companies or trainees. All AITP funds are expended for direct training costs. Trainees voluntarily enroll in the classes so they are not obligated to accept employment, nor are they assured of employment and may accept or reject any job offered.
Educators-in-Industry
Arkansas Industrial Development Commission
One State Capitol Mall
Little Rock, AR 72201
501-692-7327
Fax: 501-682-7341
This program provides educators the opportunity to visit a variety of local employers and hear directly from them about how the subjects taught in the classroom relate to the ?real world, learn about current employment requirements, as well as future trends; develop ideas, materials, and lists of resource people for the classroom; and receive three hours of graduate or undergraduate credit. Employers are given the opportunity to teach local educators at a three-hour session at their place of business; communicate directly with educators about the types of employees needed in the workforce; conduct a tour of their place of business and explain current operations and future trends; and provide information packets to be shared with students. Educator-in-Industry provides unique opportunities for educators to play a vital role in the economic development of Arkansas by learning how to better prepare students for the workplace and for employers to play a vital role in the education of Arkansas' young people by giving the curriculum in schools an added dimension of reality.
Existing Workforce Training Program
Arkansas Industrial Development Commission
One State Capitol Mall
Little Rock, AR 72201
501-682-7232
The focus of this program is skills upgrade training, specific to a company's current workforce at any level. Skills upgrade training is defined as instruction conducted in a classroom environment at a worksite, an education institution, or a neutral location, that provides an existing, full-time employee with the new skills necessary to enhance productivity, improve performance, and/or retain employment. Skills upgrade training programs provide skills development to help a company and its employees adapt to new or altered technologies, management/supervisory systems, continuous quality improvement initiatives, or production methods or the new skills needed by the company to remain competitive, productive, and economically viable. To be considered for financial assistance, a manufacturing industry must: submit an application prior to the beginning of training; provide assurance that the participants involved in the proposed training program possess the prerequisite literacy skills; and clearly tie the proposed training to specific business goals and performance objectives. The Existing Workforce Training Program will pay a portion of the costs for the approved training program; grants will range from 20-70% of allowable training costs, depending upon a series of scoring criteria; and the maximum funding for any one company site cannot exceed $50,000 per year.
State Highway and Transportation Programs
Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department
P.O. Box 2261
Little Rock, AR 72203-2261
501-569-2227
Fax: 501-569-2698
The following programs are available to students:
Cooperative Office Education (COE) is a cooperative work and training program for high school students who have completed the necessary prerequisites and are preparing for employment in office occupations. The student receives academic, vocational instruction, on-the-job training related to their career goals, and receives school credit for the employment.
Summer Employment Program: The Department hires students to work during the summer months in positions ranging from clerical to statewide travel crews. Two new programs were added in 1992. The Association of Black Engineers in Arkansas (ABEA) requested summer intern positions for young minority students who are pursuing an engineering career, and New Futures coordinated the placement of at-risk youth as part of the organizations effort to aid students with meaningful summer employment.
Engineering Interns: provides employment for civil engineering students during the summer months. An Orientation Program was added in an effort to better inform students about career possibilities within the Department and to encourage them to consider full-time employment upon graduation.
Career Development: emphasizes the importance of math, science, and English and encourages students to pursue careers in the highway and transportation field. An engineer from the Department highlights the satisfaction obtained from planning, designing and construction long-lasting projects which have positive impacts on education, economic development and the quality of life.
Workforce Development Initiatives
Governor's Commission on Adult Literacy
221 West Second St., Suite 408
Little Rock, AR 72201
501-324-9400
Fax: 501-324-9405
As the only state entity designated as the hub of a statewide network for literacy, the Governor's Commission on Adult Literacy is working to build capacity and quality of services in the area of adult learning. During 1995, the adult education/literacy community provided workplace literacy programs to 300 employers which served the education needs of over 10,000 workers. Programs available include: the Workforce Alliance for Growth in Economy (WAGE) program, a partnership between local employers as an adult collaborative effort to address the need to improve the basic skills of the unemployed and underemployed workforce. The Family-to-Work Support Center enables educators to provide workplace relevant instruction tied to employment goals of learners while meeting the employability requirements of employers. In the Workers Involved in Skills Education (WISE) program, team members develop education programs for workplaces by visiting the work site and conducting a deductive analysis of the work process. By watching workers do their jobs, the team can develop assessments and curriculum to teach essential skills in terms of the job itself.
Youth Apprenticeship/Work Based Learning Consortia Project
Ron Schertzer, Program Manager
Apprenticeship and Technical Education
Vocational and Technical Education Division
Department of Education
Luther S. Hardin Building
Three Capitol Mall
Little Rock, AR 72201-1083
501-682-1360
Fax: 501-682-1509
The primary objective of the program is to link resources of business and industry, education and the community to bridge the gap between the classroom and the workplace. It gives high school students an opportunity to develop career skills, evaluate their own potential for success, establish personal goals, earn paid apprenticeships, obtain college-level experience and gain personal contact within a specific occupation. All consortia are funded with state funds and other individually acquired sources.
back to top

California
•Apprentice Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
1301 Clay St., Suite 1090-N
Oakland, CA 94612-5217
510-637-2951
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Employment Training Panel
Employment Training Panel (ETP)
1100 J St., 4th Floor
Sacramento, CA
916-327-5640
Fax: 916-327-5260
The Employment Training Panel (ETP) program is designed to assist business in acquiring and retraining highly skilled workers and staff needed to increase competitiveness and productivity. A performance-based contract is developed and a cost reimbursement per trainee is negotiated. Trainees must remain on the payroll 90 days after training in order for employer to earn cost reimbursement. The average cost reimbursement ranges between $1,000-$2,500 per trainee that successfully completes the program. Trainees eligible include someone who is unemployed and receiving unemployment insurance benefits or has exhausted his benefits within the past 2 years; an employee covered by the Unemployment Insurance System and is in danger of being laid off; and an employee in a firm that is becoming a high performance or diversified workforce. Priorities of the program are: growth of the California economy by stimulating exports and the production of goods and services that are imported from outside the state; new employees for firms locating or expanding in the state; development of a high performance workplace for the future; training displaced workers; joint developments with business management and worker representatives; and retention and expansion of manufacturing workforce.
back to top

Colorado
•Colorado FIRST Customized Job Training Program
Office of Business Development
1625 Broadway, Suite 1710
Denver, CO 80202
303-892-3840
Fax: 303-892-3848
TDD: 303-659-2656
Colorado FIRST Customized Training Program provides quality training for companies that are relocating, expanding, or facing new competition. The program will assist employers in training new or current workers in permanent, non-seasonal jobs and provide short-term, job specific training designed to fit the company's needs. Program requirements include: jobs must pay above minimum wage levels and be accompanied by a health care coverage plan; companies must participate in the training costs, directly and indirectly; and Colorado FIRST funds do not pay wages of trainees. Financial assistance for direct training costs include: instructor wages, travel, and per diem allowances; development of curriculum and instructional materials; cost of essential training supplies, equipment and space; and training at employer's location or local community college or vocational school.
State Veterans Benefits
Colorado Department of Human Services
Division of Veterans Affairs
789 Sherman, Suite 460
Denver, CO 80203
303-894-7474
Fax: 303-866-2368
Some of the benefits Colorado provides for veterans include:
Educational Benefits: Reduced or Free Tuition at certain designated state institutions of post-secondary education for members of the Colorado National Guard (must serve 2 years for each year of education granted).
Educational Opportunities for Children: Free Tuition in certain state-supported schools for children of POW or MIA who were Colorado residents when they entered the Armed Forces, or for children of Colorado national guardsmen who died or were permanently disabled. Limited to dependents who do not qualify for federal educational benefits.
Employment Preference, Privileges: Disabled veterans shall have 10 points added to their grade and non-disabled veterans or widows of veterans whose death was due to military service shall be credited with an additional 5 points on civil service examinations.
back to top

Connecticut
•Agriculture Education
Milton S. Natusch
State Department of Education
25 Industrial Park Rd.
Middletown, CT 06457
203-638-4055
The agricultural education program serves secondary students, out-of-school youth, and adults in full and part-time programs in regional centers throughout the state. The focus is on preparing individuals for entrepreneurial opportunities or for entry into occupations in which agricultural knowledge and skills are required. The program includes inter-related components which are: classroom instruction, laboratory experience, and supervised work experience. Fees are involved except for students participating in eligible high school programs.
Apprenticeship
Bob Martin
State Department of Education
Vocational-Technical School System
25 Industrial Park Rd.
Middletown, CT 06457
203-638-4125
This program provides trade-related classroom instruction to apprentices registered with the State Department of Labor. Thirty six hours of classroom instruction per apprentice course are set up in 13 locations, based on the number of registered apprentices and the types of apprentice trades. No state or federal money is used. State-registered apprentices must pay $100 tuition fee per course and half will be reimbursed by the employer.
Community Services
Director of Community Services
Connecticut Department of Correction
90 Brainard Rd.
Hartford, CT 06114
203-566-1061
This program provides services in a residential or non-residential setting for inmates returning to the community including: pre-release planning, counseling, job development and placement counseling, substance abuse counseling, follow-up and other necessary services. Private non-profit agencies are eligible to receive funds for this community based service program. In general contractors act as brokers, advocates, referral agents, and counselors in obtaining necessary supportive services from their own and other public and private agencies. Services provided are dependent on individual client need.
Customized Job Training (CJT)
Program Manager
Connecticut Department of Labor
200 Golly Brook Blvd.
Wethersfield, CT 06109
203-566-2450
The goal of the Connecticut Workplace-Based Customized Job Training Center (CJT) Program is to help businesses grow and prosper in Connecticut by becoming highly productive and globally competitive and to build a stable, highly skilled workforce. The program is designed to stimulate the creation and retention of jobs in the state by providing financial assistance for training which the company could not have provided through its own resources. Non-financial assistance in the form of assessment of training needs and brokering of services is also given to businesses. Programs and contracts are developed on a discretionary basis to address specific training needs. Most programs have no client eligibility standards. Others may target dislocated workers or other populations.
Displaced Home maker Program
Program Manager
Connecticut Department of Labor
200 Folly Brook Blvd.
Wethersfield, CT 06109
203-566-2450
This program coordinates a statewide network of job training and support services for the displaced Home maker population. A broad program of support services and occupational training provided through four multi-purpose service centers and their satellites in different parts of the state. Participants must be someone who has worked in the Home providing unpaid household services for family members; has been dependent on the income of another family member but is no longer supported by that income or is receiving public assistance; and has had or would have difficulty in securing employment sufficient to provide for economic independence. Activities include referral, counseling, assessment of skills, job training for various occupations, job placement, and supportive services, such as child care and transportation assistance.
Institute for Industrial and Engineering Technology (IIET)
Dr. Edward Rybczyk
Central Connecticut State University
185 Main St.
New Britain, CT 06051
203-827-7966
IIET is an outreach function of the School of Technology (SOT) at Central Connecticut State University (CCSU) and offers non-credit courses and services to industry. The SOT has had a proven record of success by providing its services to over 1200 companies in Connecticut. IIET was selected to assist in delivering applications oriented problem solving services to organizations for them to stay competitive. Programs may be designed for individual organizations and employers for individuals. IIET has five Centers designed to provide services; the Manufacturing Applications Center, Procurement Technical Assistance Center and the Flexible Manufacturing Networks Center receive both federal and state money. The remaining two centers are self-sufficient; the Technical Training Center focuses on training companies on advanced manufacturing technologies and concepts ranging from quality assurance to engineering design and analysis. The Human Resource Development Center provides assistance to displaced employees, offers basic skills training, provides continuing education support to the public and private industry as well as manages the conference center at 185 Main St. in New Britain, CT.
Hispanic Human Resource Development Program
Joyce R. Thomas
Department of Social Services
25 Sigourney St.
Hartford, CT 06106
203-424-5876
This program serves persons who are targeted as language disadvantaged by providing English as a Second Language and specific skills to enter into the labor market. To be eligible you must be a Hispanic young adult, out of school, unemployed, with a language barrier. Activities include training, education, employment and supportive services.
Job Development Unit
Job Development and Placement Specialist
Commission on the Deaf and Hearing Impaired
1245 Farmington Ave.
West Hartford, CT 06107
203-561-0153
This program provides job counseling, locations and/or develops job opportunities for deaf and hard of hearing persons, assists employers as well as deaf and hard of hearing persons with on-site training and in resolving on-the-job problems, arranges for sign language interpreting services in vocational situations. Any Connecticut resident of working age exhibiting a hearing loss (including deafness) is considered eligible to pursue vocational services through the Job Unit.
Job Training Finance Program
David Willis
Planning and Program Development
Connecticut Development Authority
845 Brook St.
Rocky Hill, CT 06067
203-258-7816
This program is designed to provide below prime-rate-bank loans in amounts up to $250,000 to credit-worthy manufacturers and related economic base businesses, to assist such firms in the educational upgrade of their production workers. Program also offers performance grants up to $25,000 as part of the loan package. The borrower submits training plan applications to participating commercial lender. Eligible expenses include training plan development and administration, training expenses, training facilities, and salaries, wage benefits for trainees and in-house instructors.
Opportunities Industrialization Centers
Executive Director
Opportunities Industrialization Centers
232 North Elm St.
Waterbury, CT 06702
203-756-7987
State funding is offered to Opportunities Industrialization Centers (OIC) in order to provide basic education, skill training, plus job counseling toward employment to unemployed and/or underemployed young adults. OIC's services are only available to low-income and welfare recipients.
Services for the Blind
Stephen M. Thal, Supervisor
Vocational Rehabilitation Services for the Blind
Wethersfield, CT 06109
203-249-8525, ext. 220
Basic rehabilitation services for persons age 17-21 may include: low vision aids, diagnostic evaluation, counseling and guidance, physical restoration, vocational training, rehabilitation technology evaluation, adaptive equipment and services to assure a client is satisfactorily placed. Additional services provided to individuals who are blind may include: rehabilitation teaching evaluation and training, such as activities of daily living, Braille and/or technology orientation and mobility, may include evaluation and training in cane travel techniques as well as orientation to Home and work environments. Staff can provide in-service training to employers and community agencies who request it.
Workers Rehabilitation
Director
Division of Workers' Rehabilitation
Connecticut Workers' Compensation Commission
21 Oak St., 4th Floor
Hartford, CT 06106
203-493-1500
The Workers Compensation Commission provides Vocational Rehabilitation services to individuals injured under the Connecticut Workers' Compensation Act. Funding is provided from part of the Workers' Compensation Commission Budget which is an assessment against the insurance industry. To be eligible for the services of this program, an individual must have an accepted workers' compensation case and the injury must prevent return to former, or most recent, work and pose permanent restrictions. Workers' Rehab provides aptitude testing, evaluation, job development, job-seeking skills, counseling, formal training, job placement, and on-the-job training.
Workfare
General Assistance
Connecticut Department of Social Services
25 Sigourney St.
Hartford, CT 06106
203-424-5381
Participation in case management plan activities, which may include Workfare, is required of employable recipients of General Assistance. Activities under this program include: work experience (work crews at public works, custodial duties, clerical duties, and teacher's aide) at municipal sites, state agencies, or non-profit organizations; education (such as GED preparation) substance abuse counseling; training (such as clerical skills, data entry, and machine skills training); job search activities. Local Welfare Officials are required to submit proposed Employability Plan and Workfare sites for approval. Recipients who fail to participate as assigned are subject to a 90-day suspension of financial benefits.
back to top

Delaware
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
Lock Box 36 Federal Building
Wilmington, DE 19801
302-573-6113
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Blue Collar Training Funds
Delaware Economic Development Office
99 Kings Highway
P.O. Box 1401
Dover, DE 19903
302-739-4271
Fax: 302-739-5749
The Blue Collar Training Funds program provides funds for business expansion, start-up, or retention. Eligible applicants include educational agencies, employers, employee organizations, proven training providers, and community-based organizations. Characteristics of training available are: short term; transferable skills; primarily for entry level positions to enter or re-enter the workforce, to permit employee upgrade, and to retain or train employees; on-site and/or classroom training; and the numbers of trainees involved should be cost-effective. Costs covered by the Blue Collar Training Fund include: instructors, classroom space/facilities, liability insurance, administrative support systems, program development, training supervision, maintenance of training records, progress monitoring, and wage subsidies to trainees.
Department of Corrections Education and Training
Department of Corrections
80 Monrovia Ave.
Smyrna, DE 19977
302-739-5601
Fax: 302-739-6740
One of the biggest concerns officials for the Department of corrections have, as it relates to its clients, is education and absence of essential job skills. The agency offers a variety of vital programs to equip clients with some of the basic skills needed to obtain employment upon release. The Volunteers of America provide a Literacy Program which provides reading skills to anyone from non-readers to 4th grade level and Literacy Training which trains residents to tutor other residents.
back to top

Florida
•Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
City Center Building
Suite 4140
227 North Bronough St.
Tallahassee, FL 32301
850-942-8336
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Quick Response Training Program
Florida Department of Commerce
Division of Economic Development
Quick Response Training Program
107 West Gaines St., Suite 466
Tallahassee, FL 32399-2000
850-922-8645
Fax: 850-921-1101
The Quick Response Training Program is a customer-driven training program designed as an inducement to secure new businesses to Florida as well as provide existing businesses the necessary training programs for expansion. Through this program, Florida is able to effectively retain, expand and attract employers offering high-quality jobs. Eligible projects are new or expanding/existing businesses that produce exportable goods or services, create new jobs and employ workers who require customized entry-level skills training. Training Requirements include: 1)Training services can be provided through community colleges, school districts, area vocational-technical centers, state universities, and when approved, at licensed and certified post-secondary private institutions. Training is limited to 18 months or less. 2) Training can be conducted at the business's own facility, at the training provider's facility, or at a combination of sites. 3) Program instructors can be either full or part time educators or professional trainers from the business. 4) The selection of trainees is the responsibility of the business, although assistance is available. The business is also responsible for establishing criteria to select trainees.
Veterans Preference in Employment
Department of Veterans' Affairs
P.O. Box 31003
St. Petersburg, FL 33731
813-898-4443
Florida laws relating too veterans are intended to provide selected veterans with an advantage in employment as a recognition of their sacrifices in the service of the nation, and also as compensation for deferring their civilian careers. There are 4 Veterans' Preference categories: 1) Persons with a service connected disability which is compensable under public laws, 2) the spouse of any person who has a total and permanent service disability and who, because of this disability cannot qualify for employment; 3) any veteran of any war who served one day on active duty during a wartime period; 4) the unremarried widow or widower of a veteran who died as a result of a service connected disability. Specific questions regarding preference eligibility, including required documentation, should be referred to the office listed above.
Veterans Scholarship Programs
Administrative and Public Information Division
Department of Veterans' Affairs
P.O. Box 31003
St. Petersburg, FL 33731
813-893-2451
The State of Florida provides scholarships for dependent children of deceased or disabled veterans or children of servicemen classified as prisoners of war or missing in action. Applicants must be between the ages of 16 and 22. The value of each award will be the amount of tuition and fees charged for 2 semesters or 3 quarters by the institution the applicant is attending. The payment is made directly to the institution, no disbursement is made to the student. For more information or an application, contact the Public Information Division.
back to top

Georgia
•HOPE Grants
Student Finance Commission
2082 East Exchange Place, Suite 200
Tucker, GA 30084-5305
770-414-3000
800-776-6878
The Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally (HOPE) program provides scholarships and grants to students attending public and approved private institutions. The intent of this award is to encourage advance training and education. This HOPE award may be applied toward tuition, books, and other education-related expenses. Funding is received from the Georgia Lottery for Education.
Quick Start
Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education
1800 Century Place, Suite 400
Atlanta, GA 30345
404-679-1700
Fax: 404-679-1710
Quick Start provides high-quality training services at no cost to new or expanding businesses in Georgia. Some of the elements of Quick Start training include: training needs analysis, examines the needs and develops recommendations for training that will be required; a detailed training plan gives a description of the training services and training schedule that will be custom-designed to meet a company?s needs; high-quality training using advanced instructional technologies; and an expert in manufacturing and business technologies, instructional designers, computer experts, video production technicians and other professionals, Every company works with a Certified Economic Developer Trainer (CEDT). The CEDT is located at one of the Georgia's Department of Technical and Adult Education?s 32 technical institutes or one of the four colleges affiliated with Quick Start.
back to top

Hawaii
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
300 Ala Moana Blvd., Room 5113
Honolulu, HI 96850
808-541-2519
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Career Kokua
Research and Statistics Office
Career Kokua Program
Department of Labor and Industrial Relations
830 Punchbowl St., Room 321
Honolulu, HI 96813
808-586-8999
Fax: 808-586-9099
Career Kokua, the Hawaii Career Information Delivery System, is a computerized library of occupational and educational information. This information is accurate, up-to-date, and easily retrievable. Its information covers career exploration, occupations, how to prepare for specific jobs, wages, schools, programs of study, job search aides, military careers, community resources, and financial aid. The general public can use Career Kokua computers at Employment offices. Career Kokua computers are located at all secondary schools, community colleges, University of Hawaii's Manoa campus, some community agencies, the Employment Resource Centers and at some military bases. The user agencies receive handbooks and training so their counselors can assist students, clients, and interested persons. Funds for this service are provided by the state and by user fees.
Employment and Training Fund Program
Department of Labor and Industrial Relations
830 Punchbowl St., Room 321
Honolulu, HI 96813
808-586-8839
Fax: 808-586-9068
The Employment and Training Fund (EFT) Program makes available to employers and individuals timely and innovative programs in business-specific training, upgrade training, new occupational skills training, management skills training and similar activities. EFT may be used to fund: the operation of the state employment service for which no federal funds have been allocated; business-specific training programs to create a more diversified job base and to carry out the purposes of the new industry training program; industry or employer-specific training programs where there are critical skill shortages in high growth occupational or industry areas; training and retraining programs to assist workers who have become recently unemployed or are likely to be unemployed; programs to assist residents who do not qualify for federal or state job training programs to overcome employment barriers; and training programs to provide job-specific skills for individuals in need of such assistance to improve career employment prospects.
Employment Training and Job Placement Services for Low-Income Persons
Office of Community Services
Department of Labor and Industrial Relations
335 Merchant St., Room 101
Honolulu, HI 96813
808-586-8675
Fax: 808-586-8685
Gaps in services or special needs to assist low-income persons and low-income persons with disabilities in becoming employed are addressed by Chapter 42D Contracts with Private Sector Service Agencies. The services assist low-income persons and low-income persons with disabilities with employment through pre-employment training, occupational skills training including on-the-job training, and job development and placement.
Offender/Ex-Offender Program
David Kamiyama
Offender/Ex-Offender Project
Alu Like Inc.
1427 Dillingham Blvd., #205B
Honolulu, HI 96817
808-848-8255
Fax: 808-842-3717
The Project will complete an in-depth assessment on the capabilities, needs, and vocational potential of the ex-offenders seeking services from the project. A determination on the course of training, work, and services most appropriate to address each individual's employment goals and needs will be jointly agreed to by the ex-offender and the project's Employment Specialist. The service plan will identify employment goals and projected timetable of services. The Project will assist with referrals to Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) programs to provide classroom training in basic education and/or vocational skills, worksite experience, on-the-job and other training designed to enhance the employment potential of participants. On-the-job training sites will be developed by the project prior to referral to a JTPA program. Referrals to JTPA programs will be initiated due to the project not having training monies for participants. Due to recent budget cuts, this program is currently available only on the island of Oahu.
Operation Nightingale
Patrick Dickson
Operation Nightingale
Kapiolani Community College
Building 854-5, 600 Pensacola St.
Honolulu, HI 96814
808-538-7744
Operation Nightingale assists international nurses to pass the state licensure exam for registered nurses. Kapiolani Community College offers instruction in English and test-taking strategies so that registered nurses can be licensed to meet the critical nursing shortage in the state. The program is advertised in the news media and at health care institutions.
Psychosocial Rehabilitation Program
Brenda Hashimoto, Program Specialist
Adult Mental Health Division
Department of Health
Box 3378
Honolulu, HI 96801
808-733-9333
Through the Department of Health's nine Community Mental Health Centers' Psychosocial Rehabilitation program, the following vocational rehabilitation services are provided to persons with severe disabling mental illness: 1) Functional assessment/evaluation to determine the individual's capabilities and level of functioning. 2) Work-activity programs to assist individuals in their development of desired work habits and attitudes. 3) Psycho-educational classes to assist the individual with the understanding of their illness, medication, symptoms, and stress. 4) Social skills training for the development of interpersonal, communication, problem-solving, and independent living skills. 5) Vocational counseling services to individuals referred and participating in the Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services during the time that they are with the programs. 6) Support services for individuals who are employed and/or interested in employment.
back to top

Idaho
•Customized Education and Training
Division of Vocational Education
650 West State St.
P.O. Box 83720
Boise, ID 83720-0095
208-334-3216
Fax: 208-334-2365
Short-term training programs for adults are supported primarily by employer contributions, user fees, and business and industry donations. The goal is to deliver customized training for employer needs that actively contributes to Idaho's continued economic, rural and community development. The Idaho technical college system helped more than 37,500 Idaho employees upgrade their skills or learn brand new ones in fiscal year 1995 and provided customized training to numerous Idaho businesses.
Workforce Development Training Fund
Manager, Business Development
Idaho Department of Commerce
700 West State St.
Boise, ID 83720
208-334-2470
Fax: 208-334-2631
The Workforce Development Training Fund will be created to fund a trained workforce for Idaho employers. This Fund is to provide training and retraining opportunities that would not otherwise exist for Idaho's workforce. It will be dedicated to provide training for: skills necessary for specific economic opportunities and industrial expansion initiatives; and upgrading skills of currently employed workers at risk of being permanently laid off. The program is still in development and many details have not yet been addressed. It will be funded by a small portion of the state's share of the unemployment tax. The legislation provides opportunities for workforce retention and workforce expansion and should be implemented by the summer of 1996.
back to top

Illinois
•Displaced Home makers
Doris Moy
Illinois Department of Labor
Displaced Home makers Program
160 North LaSalle
Chicago, IL 60601
312-793-7111
Fax: 312-793-5257
TDD: 312-782-2000
A displaced Home maker is a person who 1) has worked in the Home for a substantial number of years providing unpaid services for family members; 2) is not gainfully employed; 3) has difficulty in securing employment; and 4) was dependent on the income of another family member but is no longer supported by such income, or was dependent on federal assistance and is no longer eligible for such assistance. Agencies eligible to apply for program funds are those which can demonstrate that they are currently providing some type of services to the population. Allowable activities for individuals include assessment; career guidance and testing; self-confidence building; assertiveness training, job readiness workshops, job development and placement; work experience; supportive services, and referrals.
Earnfare
Deborah McCarrel
Illinois Department of Public Aid
400 Iles Park Place
Springfield, IL 62762
217-785-0465
Fax: 217-782-5708
TDD: 217-785-8035
Participants engage in assigned employment activities equal to the amount of the Food Stamp benefits divided by the federal minimum wage. Subsequently, minimum wage assistance is earned for each additional hour of performance in Earnfare activity up to a maximum of $231 per month. Participants continue working at the initial Earnfare provider worksite for six months out of any twelve consecutive month period or until reassigned or reassessed. Participants must accept bona fide offers of employment and apply for jobs for which the provider makes a referral. Transportation expenses are provided for job interviews arranged by Earnfare employers. A clothing allowance is available which allows an individual to receive up to $100 in a 12-month period for clothing needed to go to the Earnfare assignment.
Educational Opportunities for Children of Deceased War Veterans
Vickey Campbell
Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs
833 South Spring
P.O. Box 19432
Springfield, IL 62794-9432
217-782-3418
Fax: 217-524-0344
TDD: 217-524-4645
With certain restrictions, this state funded program offers payments of $250 for matriculation and tuition fees, board, room rent, books and supplies at elementary school, high school, and other institutions in Illinois for youth between the ages of 10-18 years. Requirements are extensive; details are available from the office listed above.
Employer Training Assistance Program
Dennis Sienko
Prairie State 2000 Authority
James R. Thompson Center
Suite 4-800
100 West Randolph St.
Chicago, IL 60601
312-814-2700
Fax: 312-814-2703
TDD: 312-814-3842
Prairie State 2000 is an Illinois State Agency that invests in currently employed worker training tied to technological or productivity quality changes in the workplace. The focus is on assisting job retention through skills upgrading. Funds are awarded under two programs: the Employer Training Assistance Program (ETAP) and the Individual Training Assistance Program (ITAP). Prairie State receives referrals from local and state economic development groups, trade associations, community colleges and directly from employers. Grants and loans are awarded to businesses on the basis of financial need and type of retraining planned. Allowable activities include trainer costs, materials, and supplies.
Employment Services Coalition Program
Bing Senger
Illinois Department of Children and Family Services
Division of Youth and Community Services
406 East Monroe St.
Springfield, IL 62702
217-785-2570
Fax: 217-785-0395
TDD: 217-524-3715
This program is an interagency, collaborative venture to provide work experience and create employment opportunities for troubled youth in the north and west areas of Chicago. The primary activities of the coalition are: the teaching of basic literacy skills, the provision of work experience to enrolled youth, and post-work center job development. Those eligible are youth, ages 14-17, who have been adjudicated to be delinquent or to be in violation of probation for a delinquent act, or who the judge would otherwise commit to the Juvenile Division of the Department of Corrections, and no other resources are available to meet the youths needs.
Illinois Labor-Management Program
Sue Fierce
Illinois Department of commerce and Community affairs
High Performance Workplace Division
620 East Adams
Springfield, IL 62701
217-785-6219
Fax: 217-524-3701
TDD: 217-785-6055
Local labor management committee programs and services include: programs to establish and increase the effectiveness of cooperative labor management initiatives in the workplace, in both private and public sectors; conducting educational workshops/seminars on issues of mutual concern to local labor and management; implementation/facilitation of joint construction agreements to promote benefits of cooperation in the construction industry; programs promoting labor management cooperation in small to medium sized firms as a foundation for human resource development; programs creating partnerships between local businesses, labor unions and schools addressing future job skills needed to increase quality and productivity; and, programs promoting the use of labor management committees in layoff or plant closing situations.
Individual Training Assistance Program
Dennis Sienko
Prairie State 2000 Authority
James R. Thompson Center
Suite 4-800, 100 West Randolph St.
Chicago, IL 60601
312-814-2700
Fax: 312-814-2703
TDD: 312-814-3842
Prairie State 2000 is an Illinois State Agency that invests in currently employed worker retraining tied to technological or productivity/quality changes in the workplace. The focus is upon assisting job retention through skills upgrading. Experienced Illinois employed workers are candidates for retraining vouchers. Unemployed workers may be eligible, assuming all other training resources have been exhausted.
Industrial Training Program
Jerry L. Burger
Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs
620 East Adams
Springfield, IL 62701
217-785-6284
Fax: 217-524-3701
TDD: 217-785-6055
or
Industrial Training Program
Department of Commerce and Community Affairs
James R. Thompson Center
100 West Randolph St., Suite 3-400
Chicago, IL 60601
312-814-2809
Fax: 312-814-2370
The purpose of this program is to increase economic development activities to small and medium-sized businesses and to increase the cost efficiency of state-delivered economic development programs and services. Any multi-company project sponsored by manufacturing associations, community colleges, strategic manufacturing partnerships, and grant recipients or administrative entities under the Job Training Partnership Act is eligible to apply for funding. Individual companies may apply for funding if they are retraining their workforce or training new employees in conjunction with an expansion or new location.
MIA/POW Scholarships
Vickey Campbell
Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs
833 South Spring
P.O. Box 19432
Springfield, IL 62794-9432
217-782-3418
Fax: 217-524-0344
TDD: 217-524-46455
The Missing-in-Action/Prisoner of War scholarship includes benefits to defray costs of tuition and certain fees or treatment at therapeutic, rehabilitative or higher educational facilities for any spouse, natural child or step-child of an eligible veteran. Application is made through the state controlled university or college that the applicant wished to attend or through any local Department of Veterans Affairs service office. The child must begin using the scholarship prior to his or her 26th birthday.
Project Second Chance
Bob Senger
Illinois Department of Children and Family Services
Division of Youth and Community Services
406 East Monroe St.
Springfield, IL 62702
217-785-2570
Fax: 217-785-0395
TDD: 217-524-3715
This program involves the development and coordination of local employment and training services for youth leading to unsubsidized employment. Private sector agencies recruit and train a corps of volunteers to provide client employment assistance to project youth, direct placement of youth in unsubsidized employment, and enrollment of youth in vocational training programs, community colleges or high school programs. Youths ages 16 through 20 served by private sector youth service agencies funded by the Department of Family Services are eligible for services.
Senior Employment Specialist Program
Paul Crutchfield
Illinois Department on Aging
Senior Employment Specialist
State of Illinois Center
Suite 10-350, 100 West Randolph St.
Chicago, IL 60601-3220
312-744-4016
Fax: 312-814-2916
TDD: 800-2552-8966
The Illinois Department on Aging (IDOA) is mandated by the Illinois Act on Aging to coordinate training and employment-related activities for the state's older individuals. IDOA funds the Area Agencies on Aging to hire Senior Employment Specialists, whose main responsibilities are to establish an effective system of coordination and delivery of training and employment services for older individuals by tapping the resources and coordinating with Illinois' 26 Job Training Partnership Act private industry councils, Employment Service Office, private and public sector employers, universities and colleges, the Older Americans act Title V Senior Community Service Employment Program and other training and employment-related services. The purpose of the program is to provide older individuals the maximum opportunity for training and employment programs and services.
State Literacy Grant Program
Judith Rake
Illinois Secretary of State Literacy Office
431 South 4th St.
Springfield, IL 62701
217-7855-6921
Fax: 217-785-6927
TDD: 217-524-0040
The Literacy Office administers two grant programs to improve the basic skills of adults. The community literacy program currently uses volunteers to upgrade the basic skills of adults functioning below the ninth grade level. The workplace literacy grant provides dollars to businesses which match the public money to provide job-specific basic skills at the worksite.
Youth Employment and Training Program
Bob Senger
Illinois Department of Children and Family Services
Division of Youth and Community Services
406 East Monroe St.
Springfield, IL 62702
217-7855-2570
Fax: 217-785-0395
TDD: 217-524-3715
Youth are referred to this program as a condition of probation by the Juvenile Court Judge or the governor's Youth Service Initiative Coordinator. If the youth meets eligibility criteria, a full range of unified Delinquency Intervention Services will be made available, including pre-employment training classes. The goals of these services are: to improve self-awareness, self-confidence and self-reliance; to improve the ability to communicate and work with peers, adults and authority figures; to facilitate the ability to cope with stressful situations and deal with frustration; to enhance the ability to handle responsibility; and to increase the ability to confidently seek employment.
back to top

Indiana
•Training 2000 Program
Business Development Division
Indiana Department of Commerce
One North Capitol, Suite 700
Indianapolis, IN 46204-2288
800-662-7832
Fax: 317-233-5123
TDD: 317-233-5977
Indiana's Training 2000 program is designed to provide financial assistance to new and expanding industries committed to training their workforce. The program will reimburse a company up to a maximum of 50% of their eligible training costs. Reimbursement will not exceed $200,000 for retraining existing workers. Reimbursement for training new hires will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Types of assistance eligible include instruction costs, some travel costs and materials and supplies. Eligible training activities include: basic skills; reading, writing, and math; transferable skills which will enhance an employee's general knowledge, employability and flexibility in the workplace; company-specific skills which are unique to an individual company's workplace, equipment and/or capital investment; and quality-assurance skills which are intended to increase the quality of the company's product. Sixty percent of the grant award will be made available for reimbursement as soon as the training contract is executed. Once the company has achieved 80% of its contracted job creation and investment goals, an additional 20% is made available. After the company achieves 100% of its contracted job creation and investment goals, the remaining 20% of the grant award will be made available for reimbursement.
back to top

Iowa
•Iowa Conservation Corps
Duane Leitch
Iowa Department of Economic Development
200 East Grand Ave.
Des Moines, IA 50309
515-281-9020
Fax: 515-242-4809
The Iowa Conservation Corps (ICC) has three components that provide meaningful employment and career education opportunities to youth between the ages of 14 and 24 in projects that enhance the state's human and natural resources. The Summer Conservation Program employs youth to perform conservation-related work for schools, cities and counties where they gain work skills and an appreciation of Iowa's natural heritage; the In-School Program provides part-time employment during the school year for handicapped and disadvantaged youth at schools, cities, counties, and nonprofit agencies with hopes of enhancing the youth's future employability; and the Young Adult Program provides persons 18-24 with conservation and human services employment. In 1995, 142 out of 148 corps members in the Young Adult Program either found unsubsidized employment or entered/ returned to college upon completion of the program.
Iowa Jobs Training Program
Iowa Department of Economic Development
Division of Work Force Development
Business and Industrial Training
150 Des Moines St.
Des Moines, IA 50309
515-281-9026
Fax: 515-281-9033
The Iowa General Assembly established the Iowa Jobs Training Program by combining the Small Business New Jobs Training Program and the Iowa Retraining Program. The program consists of the following two components:
1) Small Business New Jobs Training Services: This program provides repayable loans up to $50,000 or grants of less than $5,000 to train new employees of small businesses (500 or fewer employees) that are either new, expanding, or relocating to Iowa. Loans are repaid through the diversion of increased payroll receipts or through the diversion of increased property taxes. Training services that are customized to meet the individual needs of each business range from adult basic education to highly technical training. Methods of training include classroom and on-the-job training.
2) Retraining Services: This component provides forgivable loans up to $50,000 or grants of less than $5,000 for businesses that are retooling and, must retrain their existing employees. A loan is forgiven if a business completes its training program and retrains at least the number of employees agreed to prior to funding. Training services, customized to meet the individual needs of each business, range from adult basic education to highly technical training. On-the-job training is not available for this component. All other training methods are utilized. Unlike the new jobs training component, retraining assistance is available to a business of any size.
Job Developers
Client Services
Human Resource Center
Education/Job Training/Treatment
901 29th Ave. SW
Cedar Rapids, IA 52404
319-398-3907
Four Job Developers, one at each residential correctional facility and one that handles probation/parole clients in the Cedar Rapids area, identify job opportunities for residents, assesses their skills and oversees their placement in appropriate positions within the community. The Job Developer counsels residents during the intake phase of the program, during the job search periods and after employment with a view toward instructing them in proper appearance, job seeking practices, self-confidence and self-image, vocational strengths and interests, and other job related issues while job-seeking and after employment. There is also an instructor who teaches a class on job-related social skills to clients referred both from residential and probation/parole services. Employment training for offenders ages 16-21 is also available.
back to top

Kansas
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
444 SE Quincy St., Room 247
Topeka, KS 66683-3571
913-295-2624
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Kansas Industrial Retraining (KIR) Program
Kansas Department of Commerce & Housing
Business Development Division
700 SW Harrison, Suite 1300
Topeka, KS 66603-3712
913-296-5298
Fax: 913-296-3490
TDD: 913-296-3487
This program is a job retention tool which assists employees of restructuring industries who are likely to be displaced because of obsolete or inadequate job skills and knowledge. Eligible industries include basic enterprises that are restructuring their operations through incorporation of existing technology, development and incorporation of existing diversification of production, or the development and implementation of new production activities. At least five existing employees must be trained to qualify for assistance. The program may be used to assist firms involved in both pre-employment and on-the-job training. Pre-employment training may be used to allow the company and prospective employees an opportunity to evaluate one another before making any employment commitments. Prospective employees are given the knowledge and specific skills necessary for job entry. Trainees usually attend classes on their own time and without pay. On-the-job training is conducted after hiring. Trainees may receive instruction on the company's own production equipment on the plant floor or on similar machinery in a classroom setting.
Parole Job Fair
Mike Hammond, Parole Officer II
Technical Advisor, Job Fair
Department of Corrections
London State Office Building
Topeka, KS 66612-1284
913-296-8069
The Job Fair was designed to provide offenders with additional information regarding the kinds of job skills local employers need, and the types of jobs which are available. Employers who have taken part in the fair indicated that they had been previously unaware of the job skills of some of the offenders. Some of those skills were learned, developed, and practiced during the offender's incarceration. The Corrections Department believes the types of opportunities which are made available during such events are beneficial to all involved, and intends to cooperate with other state and local agencies to promote these activities. The total cost to conduct the most recent Job Fair was approximately $200.
State of Kansas Investments in Lifelong Learning (SKILL)
Kansas Department of Commerce & Housing
Business Development Division
700 SW Harrison, Suite 1300
Topeka, KS 66603-3712
913-296-5298
Fax: 913-296-3490
TDD: 913-296-3487
The SKILL program may be utilized by individual business or consortiums of companies adding new jobs. Like the KIT program, SKILL is intended to help companies offset the costs of training employees for new jobs. SKILL's funding capacity, however, is substantially larger because the number and average wages of the new employees determine the project funding limit. Training projects costs are financed through tax exempt, public purpose bonds issued on an as needed basis by the Kansas Development Finance Authority. The maximum amount of assistance for which a company qualifies is directly tied to the number of new jobs created and the taxable wages of those jobs over 10 years. If a company is unable to create jobs in sufficient numbers to generate withholding tax revenue according to its annual projections, the business may be required to repay a portion of the training funds on a shared basis with the state. If a company leaves the state before the bonds are retired, the full cost must be repaid, less any withholding tax contributions collected prior to the company's departure.
back to top

Kentucky
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
Federal Building, Room 187-J
600 Martin Luther King Place
Louisville, KY 40202
502-582-5223
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Bluegrass State Skills Corporation (BSSC)
Cabinet for Economic Development
2300 Capitol Plaza Tower
500 Mero St.
Frankfort, KY 40601
502-564-7140
Fax: 502-564-3256
The Bluegrass State Skills Corporation (BSSC) provides grants for the customized skills training of workers for new, expanding, and existing industries in Kentucky. Grants are awarded for portions of an employer's eligible costs of training Kentucky residents in job skills ranging from entry level to advanced, including retraining and skills upgrading of existing employees. BSSC works with other employment, job training resources, and financial incentive agencies to design a training program customized to meet the specific needs of a company. Approved training can be provided by an educational institution, private training specialists, or by the company's own trainers. Funds can be used for curriculum design and customization, instructor salaries and instructional materials. BSSC also can help to cover a portion of the travel costs for the employees of new and expanding Kentucky industries that must be sent outside of Kentucky or the USA for training as company instructors. The instructor must return to the company and train other employees on similar equipment, processes, and procedures. BSSC can reimburse the company partially for the instructor/trainer's out-of-state travel, food, and lodging expenses.
Kentucky TECH System
Cabinet for Workforce Development
Department for Technical Education
500 Mero St.
Capitol Plaza Tower
Frankfort, KY 40601
502-564-4286
Fax: 502-564-5316
The Department for Technical Education manages state-supported technical education programs and facilities, including the Kentucky TECH system. Kentucky TECH offers technical training in more than 50 job areas at 25 post-secondary and 54 secondary facilities across the state, retraining for employed adults who need new or upgraded skills, and vocational assessment. Customized employee training and assessment programs are provided to businesses and industries at technical schools, in mobile facilities or at work sites. The Kentucky TECH System guarantees employers that graduate state-operated vocational-technical schools have demonstrated competence in the skills listed on the approved task lists which represent industry-validated specification for each occupational program. Should a former student be considered by the employer as performing below a satisfactory level on any skill on the approved task lists, the Kentucky TECH System agrees to provide specific retraining at no charge for instructional costs to the employee or employer. This guarantee extends for two years from the date of graduation.
back to top

Louisiana
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
Suite 133, Afton Village Condo
3535 Sherwood Forest Blvd.
Baton Rouge, LA 70816
504-389-0253
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Quickstart Training
Quickstart Training
Department of Education
P.O. Box 94064
Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9064
504-342-3343
Fax: 504-342-3552
TDD: 504-342-3998
Companies that qualify for Quickstart Training are new or expanding businesses or industry that are creating at least 10 new jobs. Services provided include: 1) Identification of required skill level of the jobs to be performed. 2) Development of a lead-time schedule covering factors such as preparation of training materials, recruitment and selection of trainees, class starts, duration, and completion, employment of instructors, training site preparation, and other pertinent items. 3) Instructors salaries, curriculum preparation, and the facility for training are without cost to the company, unless some training is conducted within the plant. 4) Training is conducted to help prepare trainees for potential employment opportunities in the company?s new or expanding operation. Successful completion of the training program carries no obligation for trainees to accept any offer of employment, nor is an offer guaranteed to trainees. 5) Training supplies and materials such as manuals and hand tools are generally furnished by the technical college depending on the number of jobs created and the cost of these items. 6) Equipment for training purposes is sometimes furnished by the technical college depending on the cost and the possibility of it being used in other training programs at the institute.
back to top

Maine
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
Federal Building
68 Sewall St., Room 401
Augusta, ME 04330
207-622-8235
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Business Visitation Program
Department of Labor
Bureau of Employment and Training Programs
55 State House Station
Augusta, ME 04333-0055
207-624-6390
Fax: 207-624-6499
TDD: 207-794-1110
80% of all new jobs come from existing businesses. This is why the Business Visitation Program (BVP) assists local companies and communities to identify and resolve business problems. The program enlists local volunteers and the Chamber of Commerce to gather information about development problems, and economic and community concerns. It then links businesses with a variety of financial, technological, business planning, marketing and job training concerns. The goal of the BVP program is to stimulate local economic growth and prevent dislocation.
Job Development Training Fund
Department of Economic And Community Affairs
Office of Business Development
State House Station #59
Augusta, ME 04333
207-287-3153
Fax: 207-287-5701
or
Department of Labor
Bureau of Employment and Training Programs
State House Station #55
Augusta, ME 04333
207-287-33379
Fax: 207-287-4767
The Job Development training Fund has two training objectives. First, it is used to assist companies that locate or expand in Maine by helping cover a part of their unusual, unforeseen or extraordinary training costs. Second, it is available to companies that need to upgrade or retrain their employees in order to remain competitive. To apply, a company must complete a written application outlining the need for training reimbursement: providing information on the company's location or expansion plans, number of positions created, and a training plan to fill those positions created, and a training plan to fill those positions; or, provide information on the company's need for upgrade and retrain assistance, the number of positions affected, and a training plan to upgrade and/or retrain those positions.
Maine Training Initiative (MTI) Program
Department of Labor
Bureau of Employment and Training Programs
55 State House Station
Augusta, ME 04333-0055
207-624-6390
Fax: 207-624-6499
(In Maine) TDD: 800-794-1110
The Maine Training Initiative (MTI) is a state-funded program designed to make job training more available and accessible. The Job Training Service uses MTI funds to supplement other programs and to enroll people who otherwise would not meet federal eligibility guidelines. The MTI program broadens the range of possible career preparation activities.
Maine's Veterans Services
Frank Soares, Director
Maine Veterans Services Bureau
State House Station #117
Camp Keyes
Building 7, Room G8
Augusta, ME 04333-0033
207-626-4467
Fax: 207-626-4509
Veterans Dependents Educational Benefits Program: Free tuition (waiver) will be granted to eligible dependents who attend a State of Maine Supported Institution of higher learning. Eligible dependents are granted benefits for a maximum of 8 semesters which must be completed within 6 consecutive academic years from the date of first entrance. Call this office for eligibility requirements.
Professionals in Transition (PROFIT)
Nancy Jones
Professionals in Transition (PROFIT)
c/o Maine Job Service
2 Anthony Ave.
Augusta, ME 04330
207-624-5120
Fax: 207-624-5107
PROFIT was organized as a support group for professionals whose careers are in transition. Whether unemployed, underemployed or making a career change, these men and women meet together to make a positive change in their future. Placement of Maine professionals with Maine business is PROFIT's primary goal. PROFIT has two distinct outreaches to fulfill its goals: 1) to its professional members--to provide a forum for the exchange of information and ideas, education in the current employment market, and an environment of mutual support and encouragement; and 2) to the business community--to establish a direct link to qualified, skilled, professional candidates thus eliminating the need for costly recruiting activities. Bi-weekly meetings are held which feature a variety of speakers covering a wide-range of topics. PROFIT is self-managed through an independent steering committee.
Rapid Employment and Development Initiative
Department of Economic and Community Development
Office of Business Development
State House Station #59
Augusta, ME 04333
207-287-3153
Fax: 207-287-5701
or
Department of Labor
Bureau of Employment and Training Programs
State House Station #55
Augusta, ME 04333
207-287-3379
Fax: 207-287-4767
Maine responds to expansion or relocation of a company's needs through the Rapid Employment and Development Initiative (REDI). To provide workers who can learn a job quickly and adapt to change REDI offers a seamless, non-bureaucratic education and training system that includes: single point of contact, rapid response, and customized education and training. Key aspects of REDI are: recruitment, assessment, workplace literacy, computer literacy, competencies training, technical skills training, and education.
Strategic Training for Accelerated Reemployment (STAR) Program
Department of Labor
Bureau of Employment and Training Programs
55 State House Station
Augusta, ME 04333-0055
207-624-6390
Fax: 207-624-6499
(In Maine)TDD: 800-794-1110
The STAR program is a state-funded program that provides training for individuals receiving unemployment compensation or facing a layoff. Two years of training is allowable. The Job Training Service provides 100% of the cost for one year of training, and 50% of the cost for training that requires more than one year for completion. Frequently, participants are able to access post-secondary (Pell) grants or student loans for their share of two-year costs.
back to top

Maryland
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
300 West Pratt St., Room 200
Baltimore, MD 21201
410-962-2676
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Displaced Home maker Program
Maryland Department of Human Resources
311 West Saratoga St.
Baltimore, MD 21201-3521
410-767-7477
Fax: 410-767-0256
TDD: 410-767-7025
The Displaced Home maker Program provides services to women who have been Home makers for most of their adult lives and have lost their primary source of income because of separation, divorce or death of a spouse. These programs help the Home maker cope with the immediate crisis, increase her self-confidence and develop the skills needed to support herself and her family. Displaced Home maker Programs offer: Individual and career counseling, career development workshops, assistance in obtaining education and training, support groups, job referral and placement. To be eligible Home makers must be over 30, depended for support on the income of a family member and lost that income because of separation, divorce, death, disability of a spouse, or who have been dependent of government assistance as the parent of a dependent child and are no longer eligible for that assistance.
Partnership for Workforce Quality
Department of Business and Economic Development
Division of Regional Development
Office of Regional Response
217 East Redwood St.
Baltimore, MD 21202
410-767-0095
The Partnership for Workforce Quality (PWQ) provides matching grants to reimburse Maryland business (targeting manufacturers with 500 or fewer employees) for direct costs related to training activities for upgrading the skills of the business's current employees. The objectives of the program are to improve the competitiveness and productivity of the workforce and business community; to upgrade employees skills for new technologies or production process; and to assist Maryland businesses in promoting employment stability. For qualifying companies that make a commitment to the training goals, PWQ will reimburse up to 50% of the direct cost of training. The PWQ program is a catalyst to assist businesses in establishing a formalized training program. Program staff assist business with related activities which include the following: provides connections to other state services; guides businesses to resources available for productivity and training needs assessments; and advises business of the appropriate training curriculum in accordance with program guidelines and recommends resources for curriculum development.
back to top

Massachusetts
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
One Congress St., 11th Floor
Boston, MA 02114
617-565-2291
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Bay State Skills Corporation
Bay State Skills Corporation
101 Summer St., 2nd Floor
Boston, MA 02110
617-292-5100
Fax: 617-292-5105
The Bay State Skills Corporation (BSSC), a quasi-public agency, administers four categories of training programs for businesses, each of which targets a specific population and works closely with private industry to develop and provide the training needed for a changing employment market.
Tuition Waiver for Veterans
Veterans Services Department
100 Cambridge St., Room 1002
Boston, MA 02202
617-727-3570
Fax: 617-727-5902
Veterans of Massachusetts can be eligible for any state-supported course in an undergraduate degree program or certified program offered by a public college or university. To be eligible, a veteran must also be a legal resident of Massachusetts for one year and he/she must not be in default of any federal student loans. Veterans will be eligible on a space-available basis for a waiver of full or partial tuition based on proper documentation of the eligibility of the veteran. There is also the Public Service Scholarship Program which awards scholarships to children of veterans who were killed in action or are missing in action. Contact the Veterans Services Department for complete details.
Veterans Employment Preference
Veterans Services Department
100 Cambridge St., Room 1002
Boston, MA 02202
617-727-3570
Fax: 617-727-5902
Veterans are given preference in the eligibility lists of civil service positions. Civil service uses a system of absolute veteran?s preference in which someone qualifying as a veteran who receives 70 points or above on an Open Competitive Exam (including police and firefighter) is immediately placed at the head of the eligibility list. On Promotional Exams all types of veterans have two points added to their scores but are not placed at the head of the list. For Labor Service, there is no exam required and veterans, whether disabled or not, are placed at the top of the eligibility list.
back to top

Michigan
•Economic Development Job Training Program
Michigan Jobs Commission
201 North Washington Square
Lansing, MI 48913
517-373-9808
The Economic Development Jog Training (EDJT) Program helps Michigan businesses create new jobs or retain existing jobs which are at risk by improving the skills and competitiveness of Michigan's workforce. Any Michigan business which agrees to create jobs or retain jobs at risk of being lost in manufacturing, research and development, warehousing and distribution, a world headquarters, or a business which exports goods and services outside Michigan is eligible to receive education and training services funded by this program. Funded applications must show a specific employer need for the worker training, a written commitment from the employer to hire or retain the workers after completion of training, and training for full-time jobs of sufficient skill, wage, and benefit level to warrant training costs. Employers must provide a 25% match for training existing workers. Grants are awarded on a competitive application process and grant applications will be continuously accepted throughout the year until funding is exhausted.
Job Service Resume System
Michigan Employment Security Commission
7310 Woodward St.
Detroit, MI 48220
313-876-5510
In MI: 800-852-9868
The Job Service Resume System is a computer-assisted means of matching job seekers and employers. The system matches resumes from those seeking professional, managerial, technical and high-level sales positions with appropriate job openings. The system primarily serves job seekers and employers throughout Michigan. In addition, the system will accept job openings from employers outside the state and will search its files for qualified applicants willing to work anywhere in the country, and accepts resumes from job seekers outside Michigan who wish to work in the state. The Resume System does not charge a fee, and is funded by employer-paid unemployment insurance taxes.
Manpower Information and Services for Troubled Youth (MISTY)
Michigan Department of Social Services
MISTY Program Manager
235 South Cesar Chaves Ave., Suite 411
P.O. Box 30037
Lansing, MI 48909
517-335-6435
Fax: 517-335-4019
MISTY is a statewide comprehensive employment, vocational, and job training program which provides funding for services to youth exiting Michigan Department of Social Services training schools. MISTY eligible youths must be in a community placement and must be engaged in employment-related endeavors. Eligible for funding are activities related to: employment testing, academic needs evaluation; job placement and follow-up services; assistance while in training; cost or fees for training; subsidized employment; and work related clothing and tools. State wards age 15 to 20 years of age are eligible, with priority consideration for youths over age 16, who lack marketable skills and experience difficulty in finding employment.
Michigan Civilian Conservation Corps
Michigan Department of Natural Resources
Parks and Recreation Division
P.O. Box 30257
Lansing, MI 48909
517-373-9900
Fax: 517-373-4625
Activities are funded that improve Michigan's natural resources and help participants obtain work records, skills, and work experience to increase their likelihood of obtaining permanent employment. Services provided include basic education; GED preparation; work experience; job skills training, subsidized food, shelter and clothing; public information activities; life skills and placement assessment. Corps members are paid at least the minimum wage for employment activities. Unemployed residents of Michigan age 18 through 25 who are not the son or daughter of an elected or appointed public official, are recruited through local offices of the Department of Social Services, Job Training Partnership Act, and the Employment Security Commission to work in the MCCC for up to one year. Priority for enrollment is given to persons who are receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children. The program is funded through a combination of state general funds and an endowment fund also composed of state funds.
Michigan Occupation Information System (MOIS)
MOIS Office
Ingham Intermediate School District
611 Hagadorn Rd.
Mason, MI 48854
517-676-1051, ext. 338
Fax: 517-676-3399
MOIS is the primary source of career information customized to the state of Michigan. It is a major career exploration tool for both young people and adult workers. The system is used at over 1,400 sites around Michigan. The computer system searches through thousands of pages of information and allows users to explore over 2,000 job titles arranged in over 400 occupational clusters. The major file in the MOIS system is the occupational file covering the nature of the occupation, working conditions, worker requirements, earnings and advancement, employment and outlook, education and training, and sources of additional information. MOIS supports self-awareness and world-of-work awareness through 16 different search strategies covering work and personal characteristics such as aptitudes, interests, education, training, physical demands and job content. Many schools, libraries, and public agencies make it available for use by the public. The MOIS system is supported totally by user fees.
back to top

Minnesota
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
316 Robert St., Room 134
St. Paul, MN 55101
651-290-3951
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Displaced Home maker Program
Minnesota Department of Economic Security
Workforce Preparation Branch
Minnesota Displaced Home maker Program
390 North Robert St., Room 125
St. Paul, MN 55101
651-296-5325
Twelve Displaced Home maker programs are delivered through five nonprofit corporations, five community action agencies, and two community colleges. The programs provide the transitional services and vocational preparation needed to allow displaced Home makers to learn to make choices concerning training or employment. A displaced Home maker is defined as a person who worked in the Home for a minimum of two years caring for Home and family, but due to separation, divorce, death or disability of spouse, or other loss of financial support, must support self and family. Eligibility is based on income guidelines; enrollment is limited to one year. Services are free to those eligible. Workshops, groups for support and networking, self esteem building, one-to-one personal or vocational counseling, job seeking methods, and resume development are among the resources used to help participants build confidence, identify skills, and seek training or employment.
Extended Employment Program
David Sheerwood-Gabrielson
Extended Employment Program
Minnesota Department of Economic Security
Rehabilitation Services Branch
390 North Robert St.
St. Paul, MN 55101
651-296-9150
800-326-9095
TDD: 651-296-3900
This program provides on-going employment support services to individuals in a variety of work settings including community rehabilitation program in-house sites, community-based group sites, and community-based individual sites. Individuals work in a variety of occupations including manufacturing, food service, office occupations, hospitality occupations, janitorial, and other service industries. The focus has been to increase the number and types of employment choices available to people with the most severe disabilities, paying particular attention to supporting integrated employment in the communities in which the individuals live.
Minnesota Job Skills Partnership
Minnesota Department of Trade and Economic Development
500 Metro Square
121 7th Place East
St. Paul, MN 55101-2146
800-657-3858
651-296-0388
Fax: 651-296-5287
TDD: 651-282-6142
The Partnership was created to act as a catalyst between business and education in developing cooperative training projects that provide training for new jobs or retrain existing employees. Grants are awarded to public and/or private educational institutions with new or expanding businesses as partners. All projects must have at least one educational institution and one business working together. Funds may be used for educational infrastructure improvements necessary to support businesses located or intending to locate in Minnesota. Up to $200,000 of Partnership funds per grant can be awarded for a project, and a cash or in-kind contribution from the contribution business must match Partnership funds. A project may be funded for up to three years.
Youth Program
Kay Tracy or Peggie Jackson
Youth Program
Minnesota Department of Economic Security
Workforce Preparation Branch
390 North Robert St.
St. Paul, MN 55101
651-296-6064
Fax: 651-456-8519
A young person may receive a combination of the following services based on an assessment of individual need: academic enrichment and basic skills training, private sector limited internships, work experience, Youth Service Corps experiences, personal counseling, vocational counseling, life training, mentoring, peer support groups, and tutoring services. The education component of the program focuses on applied basic skills with a problem solving emphasis.
back to top

Mississippi
•Education Opportunities
Mississippi Office of State
Student Financial Aid
3825 Ridgewood Rd.
Jackson, MS 39211-6453
601-982-6663
In MS: 800-327-2980
The Mississippi Office of State Student Financial Aid offers unique programs which are not offered through the financial aid offices on the campuses of institutions of higher learning but are administered in conjunction with the financial aid offices of the individual campuses. Some of the programs available include: Mississippi Psychology Apprenticeship Program, Health Care Professions Loan/Scholarship Program, Nursing Education Loan/Scholarship, Nursing Teacher Stipend Program, Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers and Firemen Scholarship Program, southeast Asia POW/MIA Scholarship Program, and Mississippi Public Management Graduate internship Program. A catalog listing all programs, eligibility requirements and who to contact is available from the office listed above.
Industrial Training Program
Bureau of Industrial Services
Mississippi State Department of Education
P.O. Box 771
Jackson, MS 39205
601-359-3989
Fax: 601-359-6619
The state-funded industrial training program's purpose is to assist new and existing industries in meeting their training requirements. Customized training is provided to applicants before they are hired. This training is to prepare trainees for immediate placement in new jobs. Post-employment training is customized to include on-the-job programs that are conducted after the employees have been hired. This training provides job specific training. Retraining and upgrade training is customized retraining developed for existing company employees to meet changing skill requirements caused by new technology. Upgrade training consist of courses designed to assist industry employees in advancing from one job level to another. The training program is delivered through the 15 community or junior colleges, each of which has an industrial coordinator.
Skills Enhancement Program
Center for Quality & Productivity
State Board for Community and Junior Colleges
3825 Ridgewood Rd.
Jackson, MS 39211
601-982-6480
Fax: 601-982-6365
The Skills Enhancement Program is Mississippi's workforce literacy initiative, developed to offer basic skills training taught in a functional context (job related). The program addresses the critical need for upgrading skills levels so employees can learn and adapt to new technology and develop communication and problem-solving skills. Mississippi offers workforce training to businesses and industries of the state to help companies become more productive and Mississippi more competitive.
Skill/Tech
Center for Quality & Productivity
State Board for Community and Junior Colleges
3825 Ridgewood Rd.
Jackson, MS 39211
601-982-6480
Fax: 601-982-6365
Created through the Mississippi Workforce and Education Act, Skill/Tech establishes a partnership between Skill/Tech staff and advisors and Mississippi business and industry. Skill/Tech utilizes one-stop career centers established at each of the 15 community colleges. The Centers will provide a variety of services such as: assessment, counseling, skills training and placement for individual clients; and job analysis, testing and curriculum development, workplace literacy training and customized technical training for businesses.
back to top

Missouri
•Educare
Department of Social Services
Division of Family Services
P.O. Box 88
Jefferson City, MO 65103-0088
573-526-4836
Educare is part of the governor's approach to welfare reform. To enable families to move from welfare to work, Missouri's program invests in both generations. By developing, strengthening and improving a child's learning and nurturing environment, their chances for success in adulthood can be vastly improved. While their parents are in job training, pre-school children can be receiving assistance that will increase their chances for success.
Missouri Customized Training Program
Department of Economic Development
Division of Job Development and Training
P.O. Box 1087
Jefferson City, MO 65102-1087
800-877-8698
Fax: 314-751-6765
TDD: 800-347-8699
The purpose of this program is to increase and improve the state's work force by: helping new or expanding businesses recruit and train new workers for newly created jobs; and, helping retrain existing workers as a result of sizable new capital investment, introduction of new products or services, or to upgrade quality and/or increase productivity. Employees are custom trained to meet specific needs of employers in one or all three of the following methods: Skill Training is in a classroom setting at the employer's place of business or at one of more than 80 educational facilities throughout Missouri; On-the-Job Training at the worksite provides hands-on experience on the employer's own equipment, employers will be reimbursed 50% of an eligible trainee's wages; and Task Oriented Training identifies tasks for a given job. Participants include Missouri residents, as well as unskilled youth and adults in need of training with limited income or facing barriers to employment and permanently laid-off workers.
Missouri Community College New Jobs Training Program
Department of Economic Development
Division of Job Development and Training
Missouri Customized Training Program
P.O. Box 1087
Jefferson City, MO 65102-1087
800-877-8698
Fax: 314-751-6765
TDD: 800-347-8699
This program provides education and training to workers employed in newly created jobs in Missouri. Whether the new jobs are a result of a new industry or an existing industry that is expanding, this program can offer the resources necessary to train workers in new jobs at a reduced cost. Missouri is one of the few states that provides this program to companies. Training assistance can include skill assessment, orientation, pre-employment training, training facilities and equipment, instructor, curriculum development, travel and a variety of other training related services. Through On-the-Job Training, the employer can be reimbursed up to 50% of wages paid to workers in the new jobs. Eligible participants include all businesses with a sound credit rating currently located in or locating to Missouri, engaged in interstate or intrastate commerce for the purpose of manufacturing, processing, or assembling products. Companies that conduct research and development or provide services in interstate commerce are also eligible. Retail businesses, health and professional services do not qualify for the program. The program is offered at community colleges located in 12 districts in Missouri.
Task Oriented Training
Department of Economic Development
Division of Job Development and Training
Missouri Customized Training Program
P.O. Box 1087
Jefferson City, MO 65102-1087
800-877-8698
Fax: 314-751-6765
TDD: 800-347-8699
The purpose of this program is to provide companies/employers with comprehensive, on-site job analyses. By using customized job profiles, companies are able to develop on-the-job training programs which are both structured and manageable. To the employer the program provides: comprehensive job analyses; development of a structured, manageable on-the-job training program; cross-training strategies; basis for performance evaluation; identification of training needs; and linkages to vocational or technical schools, community colleges, etc. To employees the program provides: job achievement measurement; creates buy-in of company training program; awareness of safety concerns; and a pathway for improving job skills and career.
Veterans Tuition Waiver
Missouri Veterans Commission
1719 Southridge Dr.
P.O. Drawer 147
Jefferson City, MO 65102-0147
314-751-3779
Fax: 314-751-6836
The state of Missouri offers tuition-free scholarships for certain surviving family members of veterans who died as a possible result of exposure to Agent Orange or similar toxic chemicals during the Vietnam War.
back to top

Montana
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
Federal Office Building
301 South Park Ave.
Helena, MT 59626-0055
406-441-1076
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Displaced Home maker Program
State Job Training Bureau
Department of Labor and Industry
P.O. Box 1728
Helena, MT 59624-1728
406-444-4500
Fax: 406-444-3037
TDD: 406-444-0532
The Department of Labor and Industry administers the State Displaced Home maker Program, which is funded through state dollars. This program provides training, counseling and services to help displaced Home makers achieve independence and economic security. Although there is no income requirement for this program, individuals must be 18 years of age or older; have worked as an adult without remuneration to care for the Home and family and for that reason has diminished marketable skills; has been dependent on public assistance or on an income of a relative but is no longer supported by that income; will become ineligible for public services; is unemployed or underemployed; or is a criminal offender.
Dislocated Worker Program for State Employees
State Job Training Bureau
Department of Labor and Industry
P.O. Box 1728
Helena, MT 59624-1728
406-444-4500
Fax: 406-444-3037
TDD: 406-444-0532
Dislocated state employees whose employment loss means they are unlikely to return to their previous occupation are eligible for assistance. The program emphasizes a comprehensive, timely array of retraining and re-employment services, tailored to workers' individual needs, including long term job preparation.
back to top

Nebraska
•Nebraska's Customized Job Training
Job Training Coordinator
Department of Economic Development
301 Centennial Mall South, 4th Floor
P.O. Box 94666
Lincoln, NE 68509-4666
800-426-6505
402-471-3780
Fax: 402-471-3778
The purpose of customized job training is to provide state training assistance on projects which offer an opportunity for economic development in Nebraska. Use of the funds is limited to eligible companies and eligible training projects. In general, the types of companies qualifying are those engaged in activities which sell goods or services primarily to a non-Nebraska market: manufacturing, processing, warehousing, and headquarters facilities are some samples. Eligible training projects in these industries will include new investment in Nebraska which expand full-time employment or assist in upgrading job skills of existing employees in order to retain the jobs in the state.
Tuition Waiver
Department of Veterans Affairs
301 Centennial Mall South
P.O. Box 95083
Lincoln, NE 68509-5083
402-471-2458
Tuition may be waived by the University of Nebraska, state colleges, and technical community colleges on behalf of any child, spouse, widower, or widow, resident of the State of Nebraska, whose parent was a member of the Armed Forces of the U.S., and who died or was totally disabled due to a service-connected disability, classified as Missing in Action or a Prisoner of War, and meet other eligibility requirements.
back to top

Nevada
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
301 Stewart Ave., Room 311
Las Vegas, NV 89101
702-388-6396
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Claimant Employment Program
Employment Security Division
Employment, Training and Rehabilitation Department
500 East Third St.
Carson City, NV 89713
702-687-4635
Fax: 702-687-8351
The Claimant Employment Program (CEP) serves Nevada employers by building a stronger, more skilled and reliable work force by placing program-qualified claimants of Unemployment insurance (UI) into training and re-training situations increasing their employability and decreasing the probability of future unemployment. CEP offers classroom, vocational and on-the-job training to help unemployed claimants gain necessary skills to find and keep jobs. The program offers employers the opportunity to enhance their work force with qualified, competent employees trained to the employer's unique needs. And, CEP offers unemployed Nevadans enhanced employment futures.
Quick Start Job Training Program
State Job Training Office
400 West King St., Suite 108
Capitol Complex
Carson City, NV 89710
702-687-4310
Fax: 702-687-8917
The Nevada Quick Start Training Program provides short-term, intensive job training to assist new and expanding firms to reach productivity quickly. A customized program is designed covering recruitment, hiring and job training. Each project is tailored to fit the firm's needs. Major elements include the development of a job applicant list, preparation of the training program and materials, and classroom training. A firm participating in the program is required to contribute, either in-kind or cash, an amount equal to 25% of the state portion of the project budget. The program is available for training in jobs with wages exceeding $8.32 (70% of the average statewide annual hourly wage). The program may be used prior to plant opening and up to 90 days following. Depending on the extent of training required, a maximum of $1,000 per trainee is available for classroom training.
back to top

New Hampshire
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
143 North Main St., Room 205
Concord, NH 03301
603-225-1444
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
back to top

New Jersey
•Customized Training Program
New Jersey Department of Labor
Division of Workforce Development
Office of Customized Training
CN 9933
Trenton, NJ 08625-0933
609-292-2239
Fax: 609-777-1768
Customized training is provided to prevent job loss caused by obsolete skills, technological change or national or global competition; or for employees at a facility being relocated into New Jersey. To be eligible employers, labor organization or community-based organization must be seeking to create, upgrade or retain jobs in a labor demand occupation for their workers. Each employer that receives customized training services must contribute a minimum of 40% of the total cost of the customized training service. A minimum of 3% of the total funds is dedicated to occupational safety and health training and is linked to skills training and workplace needs.
New Jersey Tuition Free Program
Division of Workforce Development
Employment Security and Job Training
Department of Labor, CN 058
Trenton, NJ 08625-0058
609-292-6852
Fax: 609-292-7667
The New Jersey Tuition Free Program allows unemployed New Jersey residents, who have been in the labor market for a two-year period to take vocational courses at New Jersey State Colleges and community colleges on a class space available basis. Courses can be full or part time. For additional information contact this office or your nearest N.J. Department of Labor Workforce Development Program Center.
Workforce Development Program
Division of Workforce Development
Employment Security and Job Training
Department of Labor, CN 058
Trenton, NJ 08625-0058
609-292-6852
Fax: 609-292-7667
The Workforce Development Program (WDP) is a New Jersey Department of Labor sponsored retraining program for unemployed front line mainstream workers who have inadequate job skills to compete in today's economy. Sponsored training must be in a demand occupation and provided by an approved N.J. school. This program is targeted for permanently separated unemployed individuals. Benefits of the program include: continue to collect unemployment insurance while attending full time approved training; availability of additional benefits while in training (ABT); up to $4,000 training grants; and the N.J. Tuition Free Program. For additional information contact this office or your nearest N.J. Department of Labor Workforce Development Program Center.
back to top

New Mexico
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
505 Marquette, Room 830
Albuquerque, NM 87102
505-766-2398
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations, or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Industry Development Training Program
Department of Education
Education Building
300 Don Gaspar
Santa Fe, NM 87501-2786
505-827-6635
Fax: 505-827-6696
The Industrial Development Training Program is designed to provide quick-response manpower training to new or expanding businesses in New Mexico. Under the program financial assistance is available to assist new or expanding business with the cost associated in training employees. The amount of funding allocated is determined by the number of trainees (minimum of 3 individuals) and the amount of training needed. Training can be customized to meet the companies' needs and may be classroom, on-the-job, or a combination of both. Training assistance of up to 1,040 hours per trainee is available under the program. However, a wage scale or the DOT code is used to determine number of training hours required. Costs are reimbursed to the employer at the rate of one-half of the hourly wage rate paid to the trainee. Trainees must be guaranteed full-time employment upon successful completion of the training program.
Senior Employment Program
New Mexico State Agency on Aging
La Villa Rivera
228 East Palace Ave.
Santa Fe, NM 87501
505-827-7640
In NM: 800-432-2080
Fax: 505-827-7649
The New Mexico State Agency on Aging operates a state funded Senior Employment Program serving older workers 55 years of age and older whose income is at or below 125% of poverty level. The program funds 125 positions in which approximately 250 older workers are employed and trained throughout an average year.
back to top

New York
•Adolescent Vocational Exploration (AVE)
Office of Equity and Access
State Education Department
The University of New York
CEC Room 5C85
Albany, NY 12230
518-473-6810
Fax: 518-474-7468
Thirteen AVE projects provide services to economically disadvantaged 14-17 year olds who are at risk of dropping out of school and failing to develop the skills needed for employment. Services provided include academic and skills assessment, career and vocational exploration, tutoring and/or basic skills remediation, counseling and career and life skills instruction. This is a one year program. Like the Progressive Adolescent Vocational Exploration (PAVE) program, students completing programs that meet established criteria may be eligible to receive one academic credit which may be used toward the completion of high school requirements. The New York State Department of Labor contracts with the State Education Department to provide training and technical assistance to service providers, and to assist in establishing academic credit guidelines.
Adult Literacy Education Aid Grants
Scott Jill
Workforce Preparation and Continuing Education
Department of Education
Education Building Annex
Hawk and Elk Sts.
Albany, NY 12234
518-474-5808
Fax: 518-474-0319
This program provides funds for literacy and basic skill instruction, GED preparation, English as a Second Language (ESL) and life skills programs operated by post-secondary institutions, community based organizations, volunteer literacy agencies, and libraries.
Affirmative Action Program
Antonio Murphy
Department of Labor
State Campus, Building 12
Albany, NY 12240
518-457-1020
Fax: 518-457-6908
This consists of four separate contracts, each of which identify, recruit, and train minorities, disabled individuals, veterans, and women for jobs in the construction industry, nursing, and business. Services provided include: on-the-job training or internships, job search assistance, counseling, entry-level skill training, pre-vocational skill training, literacy and/or basic or remedial education, employability skills instruction, life skills instruction, and tuition assistance.
AIDS Institute Educational Services
Richard Cotronio
Department of Health
AIDS Institute
Educational Services
Empire State Plaza
Corning Tower, Room 270
Albany, NY 12237
518-474-3045
Fax: 518-474-5450
This program provides job training and technical assistance to health and human service providers. Activities provided include: Overview of HIV Infection and AIDS, HIV Test Counselor Training, Semi-annual HIV/AIDS Physicians' Training and Infection Control Training for health care providers. Other contracts provide a variety of HIV/AIDS educational activities. Some training is done by the AIDS Institute staff. Appropriation amounts include funds to support the HIV/AIDS Physicians Training and Infection Control Training.
Another Chance Initiative for Education, Vocation, or Employment (ACHIEVE)
Joseph Baez
Workforce Development
Department of Labor
State Campus, Building 12
Albany, NY 12240
518-457-0209
Fax: 518-457-6908
ACHIEVE focuses on increasing employment readiness and the basic skills of school drop-outs through on-the-job training, work experience, job search assistance, counseling, wage subsidy, stipends, literacy and/or basic or remedial education, life skills instruction, day care, and transportation. The focus group for this program is 18-19 year olds, but ages range from 16-21 years of age.
Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Program
Leo O'Brien Federal Building, Room 809
North Pearl & Clinton Ave.
Albany, NY 12207
518-431-4008
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Career Exploration Internship Program
Tony Schilling
Department of Education
Education Building
Washington Ave.
Albany, NY 12234
518-474-5506
Fax: 518-474-4909
Services provided include structured on-site career exploration, mentoring, and related instruction for youth enrolled in secondary schools, and also for secondary school dropouts. It is a program of structured, supervised, non-paid intensive career exploration for students ages 14 and above.
Chamber of Commerce On-The-Job Training Program
Workforce Development & Training Division
Department of Labor
State Campus, Building 12
Albany, NY 12240
518-457-0206
Fax: 518-457-6908
The On-The-Job Training (OJT) Program provides financial incentives to employers by helping them offset the high cost of training new workers. A company can receive a reimbursement of up to 50% of an employees' wages while the employee acquires the skills necessary to perform the job. The length of training is determined by the individuals background and the complexity of the job. In addition to this wage subsidy, other benefits may be provided to reduce an employer's training cost. Some of these include: cost of related classroom instruction; reasonable cost of tools, materials and equipment; 75% reimbursement if a new job is created or an Unemployment Insurance recipient is hired under the program; and although the OJT Program is designed primarily for new workers, some Chambers can provide reimbursement to companies who are upgrading the skills of their current workforce.
Children of Veterans Awards
Executive Department
Division of Veterans Affairs
5 Empire State Plaza, Suite 2836
Albany, NY 12223-1551
518-474-6114
Fax: 518-473-0379
The award provides student financial aid to children of veterans who served in the United States Armed Forces during specified periods of war or national emergency and, as a result of service, died, suffered a 40% or more disability, were a prisoner of war or are Missing in Action. The student must enroll full time in an approved post-secondary educational program in New York State, be a New York State resident, meet U.S. citizenship requirements, and be in good academic standing. Contact this office for additional information on specific requirements.
Correctional Services Occupational Training
John Nuttall, Education Programs
Program Services
Department of Corrections
1220 Washington Ave.
Albany, NY 12226-2940
518-457-8143
Fax: 518-457-2940
The Correctional Services Occupational Training Program provides on-the-job training, counseling, stipends, skills upgrading, skills retraining, basic skills and/or literacy instruction, and employability skills instruction to inmates so that they may enter or re-enter gainful employment when released.
Displaced Home maker Program
Karen Coleman
Dislocated Worker Unit
Department of Labor
State Campus, Building 12
Albany, NY 12240
518-457-6998
Fax: 518-457-6908
This program assists displaced Home makers in becoming economically independent by providing the counseling, on-the-job training or internships, job search assistance, skills upgrading, skills retraining, pre-vocational skills training, literacy instruction, basic or remedial education, employability skills instruction, life skills instruction, and day care and transportation assistance. Services available may vary from center to center. There are 24 programs statewide, operated by 19 contractors.
Dislocated Worker Assistance Center
Dislocated Worker Assistance Center (DWAC)
State Office Building
207 Genesse St., Room 108
Utica, NY 13501
315-793-2754
315-793-2753
Fax: 315-793-2509
The Dislocated Worker Assistance Center (DWAC) is a program jointly administered by the New York State AFL-CIO and New York State Department of Labor, designed to help individuals who have permanently lost their jobs. The Center provides a full array of services to dislocated workers and their families, including peer counseling, assessment, job training, education and worker literacy programs, job development, program eligibility certification, and referral for all training programs and benefits available to dislocated workers. In addition to dislocated workers, the Center offers services to Displaced Home makers--those who have been in the role of a Home maker and are now reentering the labor market due to a change in income resulting from death, divorce, separation, or permanent dislocation or disability of a spouse. This center serves individuals from a three county area consisting of Oneida, Herkimer, and Madison counties.
Emergency Medical Technical Certification Program
Edward Wrongski
Department of Health
Corning Tower
Empire State Plaza
Albany, NY 12237
518-474-2219
Fax: 518-474-5450
This program provides funding to community colleges, county governments and other approved sponsors to conduct entry-level and upgrade training to emergency medical technicians.
Firm/Industry Specific Training
Empire State Development Corporation
633 3rd Ave.
New York, NY 10017
212-803-3100
Firm/Industry Specific Training is one form of assistance available through the Regional Economic Development Partnership Program. Services available include entry level skills training, literacy and English as a second language instruction, and basic or remedial education.
Green Thumb Program
Green Thumb Environmental
74 Main St.
P.O. Box 214
Stamford, NY 12167
607-652-2015
Enacted by the State Legislature in 1974, the Green Thumb Program provides meaningful and fulfilling work for senior citizens through various service activities designed to enhance the state's natural beauty and to play a vital role in maintaining the natural and man-made resources in New York State. To be eligible individuals must be at least 55 years old and fall within the income guidelines provided within state law. A certificate from a physician stating that one is healthy enough to work is required. Green Thumb will provide $30 toward the cost of a physical. The program is operated to ensure that employees earnings remain below the threshold that would impact social security benefits. This arrangement provides senior citizens with an opportunity to remain active, supplement their income, and provide a valuable service to the state without incurring a financial penalty. Work is part time, averaging three days a week for 7 hours per day. Payment for Green Thumb work is equal but not limited to the prevailing New York State minimum wage.
Health Care Worker Training Program
Anne Bryant
Workforce Development & Training Division
Department of Labor
State Office Campus, Building 12
Albany, NY 12240
518-457-0119
This program was designed to facilitate career advancement for employed health care workers by providing cross training and retraining opportunities to workers being affected by changes in the industry. The training program design may include, but is not limited to, one or more of the following: an on-the-job training program and/or site education program for credentials or a licensed health care professional; training in multiple skills to upgrade or retrain current employees by adding additional competencies and skills; retraining opportunities for workers that will prepare them to meet changes in patient care needs and/or work in alternative patient care settings. Funding for projects is awarded on a yearly basis through a Request for Proposal process. Eligible applicants include health care worker unions, joint labor management committees, health care providers (hospitals, long term care facilities) or consortia of health care providers. The program requires a 100% match from other funding sources for all funds requested.
Job Training for Individuals with Disabilities
Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities
44 Holland Ave.
Albany, NY 12229
518-474-6601
Fax: 518-473-1271
Services provided include sheltered workshops which provide developmentally disabled individuals a range of vocational services and employment in a protected environment; supported employment including job-site training both in job skills and interpersonal skills; the Employment Training Program for youth and adults providing basic life skills and on-the-job training for developmentally disabled; and the Youth Opportunity Program which provides employment and training to economically and educationally disadvantaged youth.
Jobs For Youth
Joseph Baez
Workforce Development
Department of Labor
State Campus, Building 12
Albany, NY 12240
518-457-0209
Fax: 518-457-6908
The Jobs for Youth (JFY) Apprenticeship Program serves in-school and out-of-school Job Opportunity and Basic Skills (JOBS) eligible youth, 17-21 years of age. This two-year program offers an integrated program of study that includes academic curriculum, work-related instruction, and supervised, structured on-the-job training. Following this program, youth will be placed into entry level or full-time registered apprenticeships, exclusively or in combination with post-secondary studies.
Liberty Partnerships
Department of Education
The University of the State of New York
Office of Equity and Access
CEC Room 5C85
Albany, NY 12230
518-473-6810
Fax: 518-474-7468
The Program awards grants to post-secondary institutions for the purpose of providing supportive services to students in public and non-public schools who are identified as having a high risk of dropping out of school. Awards are made on a competitive basis to degree-granting institutions, individually or in consortia, in cooperation with school districts and no-for-profit community-based organizations. The purpose of the program is to provide those students with a broad range of services designed to increase their motivation and ability to complete secondary education and seek entry into post-secondary education or the work force.
Progressive Adolescent Vocational Exploration (PAVE)
Office of Equity and Access
State Education Department
The University of New York
CEC Room 5C85
Albany, NY 12230
518-473-6810
Fax: 518-474-7468
PAVE is a two-year program which replaced the Structured Education Support Program. It is a career exploration and educational support program which focuses on serving economically disadvantaged youth who are at risk of dropping out of school or graduating without marketable skills. Supportive services include classroom instruction, remedial support, counseling, employment assistance, and personal development activities. During the second year of the PAVE program, students will have the opportunity to participate in internships, apprenticeship programs, entrepreneurial programs and activities, and other individual work exploration activities. Students completing programs that meet established criteria may be eligible to receive one academic credit which may be used toward the completion of high school requirements. The New York State Department of Labor contracts with the State Education Department to provide training and technical assistance to service providers, and to assist in establishing academic credit guidelines. There are 21 PAVE projects throughout New York State.
Skills Training Program
Peter Manella, Director
Skills Training Program
Department of Economic development
One Commerce Plaza
Albany, NY 12245
518-474-0672
The New York State Department of Economic Development has grant funding available through the Skills Training Program to help businesses retain jobs, create new employment opportunities, and improve competitiveness by implementing principles of High Performance Work Organizations. Types of training projects can include: implementing industrial modernization initiatives, training workers in employee participation practices, upgrading workers skills to adapt to new production processes, and training new workers for expanding companies. Applicants for training projects may include educational institutions, individual businesses, industry groups or associations, labor unions or organizations, community-based organizations, and local Job Training Partnership agencies. Skills Training Program funds must be matched on at least a dollar-for-dollar value basis. Special consideration is given to projects such as: businesses employing fewer that 200 persons, training for disadvantaged persons, displaced Home makers and dislocated workers for new jobs; businesses located in distressed areas; and assistance to minority or women-owned businesses.
South Forty Corporation
State of New York
Department of Correctional Services
The Harriman State Campus
1220 Washington Ave.
Albany, NY 12226-2050
518-457-8182
Fax: 518-457-7252
South Forty provides vocational assessment, pre-employment training, and job placement services to work release participants at New York City Work Release Facilities. Vocational assessment services are provided to referred inmates to examine their capabilities, needs, and vocational potential and to develop a service strategy and employment goal. Clients are evaluated by taking into account his or her family situation, work history, education, occupational skills, interests, aptitudes, attitude towards work, motivation, behavior patterns affecting employment, potential financial resources and supportive service needs, and personal employment information as it relates to the local labor market.
Teacher Opportunity Corps
Department of Education
The University of the State of New York
Office of Equity and Access
CEC Room 5C85
Albany, NY 12230
518-473-6810
Fax: 518-474-7468
The goals of the Teacher Opportunity Corps (TOC) program are to enhance the preparation of teachers and prospective teachers in addressing the learning needs of students at risk of truancy, academic failure or dropping out of school, and to increase participation in teaching careers by individuals who are from economically disadvantaged backgrounds or from minority groups historically underrepresented in teaching. Participants in the 17 current TOC projects are provided with specialized curricula addressing the needs of at-risk students; internships; clinical experiences; mentoring during the first year of teaching; counseling and other supportive services; and financial assistance.
Teacher Resource and Computer Training Center
Isabel Pickett
Teacher Centers
Department of Education
Washington Ave.
Albany, NY 12234
518-473-1234
Fax: 518-473-4909
These centers provide skills upgrading and life skills instruction; professional support and staff development primarily for teachers, other school professionals, and parents. Services are provided by teachers, administrators, consultants, and university faculty. There are 117 centers statewide. Approximately 290,000 teachers, other school professionals, and parents are served annually.
Vera Institute of Justice
State of New York
Department of Correctional Services
The Harriman State Campus
1220 Washington Ave.
Albany, NY 12226-2050
518-457-8182
Fax: 518-457-7252
Vera is a non-residential work incentive, skills training program comprised of a Vocational Development Program (VDP) and Neighborhood Work Projects (NWP) located in New York city which encompasses releasees from the five boroughs of the metropolitan area. The program is designed to enhance the employability and future employment opportunities by enrolling releasees and providing work experience in structured settings. Counseling services are also available. This is a not-for-profit organization which specializes in inmate follow-up job placement services where releasees can return to work with NWP and work with their VDP job developers to find further employment.
Wildcat Services Corporation
State of New York
Department of Correctional Services
The Harriman State Campus
1220 Washington Ave.
Albany, NY 12226-2050
518-457-8182
Fax: 518-457-7252
Wildcat provides supportive work, training, employment services, and job placement for individuals participating in the Department of Correctional Services Work Release Program. Enrollment can range from 6 to 18 months depending on the training needs of the individual participants. Participants can be trained to perform construction, maintenance, painting, and clerical tasks. The program goal is to place at least 55% of releasees in unsubsidized employment. Wildcat also provides post-placement follow-up services for two years.
Workforce Development Initiative
Donald Menze
The City University of New York
Workforce Development Center
New York, NY 10021
212-387-1490
This is a comprehensive array of workforce related initiatives for employed adults addressing the following goals: promoting and supporting small business; retraining and skill upgrading; meeting the shortages of qualified teachers, preparing undergraduates for skill shortage occupations; job creation and economic development; and labor market research, planning, and program coordination.
Workplace Literacy Program
Robert Knower
Adult and Family Education Team
Office of Workforce Preparation and Continuing Education
Department of Education Building, Room 307
Albany, NY 12234
518-474-5808
The Workplace Literacy Program is designed to build the capacity of labor organizations, expand literacy opportunities for union members and other workers, as well as to encourage the establishment of job-related literacy and basic skills education. To be eligible to participate in a Workplace Literacy Program in New York State, a person must be an employee of a public or private employer or a member of a union and have a demonstrated need for job-related literacy and/or basic skills education.
back to top

North Carolina
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Program
Somerset Part, Suite 205
4407 Bland Rd.
Raleigh, NC 27609
919-790-2801
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Focused Industrial Training
Glynda Lawrence, Associate Director
Business and Industry Services
N.C. Department of Community Colleges
200 West Jones St.
Raleigh, NC 27603-1337
919-733-7051
Fax: 919-733-0680
Focused Industrial Training (FIT) is a special training program for North Carolina's traditional industries. Serving primarily manufacturing clients, FIT uses individualized needs assessments and consultations to design and implement targeted, customized training for organizations who need to upgrade workers' skills because of technological or process advances. FIT is designed to serve the special needs of existing industry. This program keeps North Carolina's economy strong and healthy. Qualified instructors conduct classes at the company site, or in one of the 58 community colleges throughout the state.
New Industry Training Program
Joe Sturdivant, Director
Business and Industry Services
N.C. Community College system
200 West Jones St.
Raleigh, NC 27603-1337
919-733-7051
Fax: 919-733-0680
Companies that create at least 12 new production jobs are eligible for training programs which are administered at one of the 58 community colleges throughout the state. Industrial training specialists visit an existing operation to study the job skills, work schedules, production processes and any other pertinent variables and then prepare a proposal regarding the nature of the jobs and the skills they require. Companies may use their own instructors or the local college may assign faculty members or recruit special instructors. Employees can be trained before they're hired, after they're hired, or programs can be designed to include both options. The State of North Carolina finances this program completely, including all classroom materials such as texts, workbooks, and some computer-based packages.
Employment and Training Grant Program
Public Affairs
Department of Commerce
301 North Wilmington St.
Raleigh, NC 27626-0571
919-733-7651
Fax: 919-733-8356
The purpose of the grant program is to make grants available to local agencies operating on behalf of the Private Industry Councils serving Job Training Partnership Act service delivery areas for the purpose of upgrading the foundation of basic skills of the adult population and existing workforce in North Carolina.
Training Initiatives
Research and Statistics Division
Department of Labor
4 West Edenton St.
Raleigh, NC 27601
919-733-4940
Fax: 919-733-6197
The Department of Labor develops and operates model, pilot, and demonstration programs which can be replicated for system wide or statewide applications. These programs are able to field test new tools or processes which can more efficiently serve targeted populations. They operate programs which address target populations or address skill or labor shortages in either an industry or business sector or specific geographic area.
back to top

North Dakota
•No-Cost Job Training
The North Dakota Department of Economic Development and Finance
1833 East Bismarck Expressway
Bismarck, ND 58504-6708
701-328-5300
Fax: 701-328-5320
TDD: 800-366-6888
The No-Cost Job training for New and Expanding businesses program is administered by the Job Service of North Dakota in cooperation with education and training providers: to assist in designing training for a company's specific needs; business loans for training for a company's specific needs; business loans for training are obtained from the North Dakota Department of Economic Development & Finance and repaid through state income tax withholding credits. Instead of the state income tax on the wages paid to new employees going to the state general fund, that income tax revenue is used to pay off the loan. Once the loan is repaid, state income taxes on wages revert to the state's general fund. Qualifying criteria includes: businesses location in the state must create a minimum of five new jobs, expanding businesses must increase employment by at least one employee; business must not be closing or reducing its operations in one area of the state and relocating the same operation to another part of the state; every employee participating in the new jobs training program must be paid at least $7.50 an hour plus benefits within the first 12 months; and business must have an economically and socially desirable purpose.
Workforce 2000
Job Training Division
Job Service of North Dakota
P.O. Box 5507
Bismarck, ND 58502
701-224-2861
Fax: 701-224-3262
TDD: 800-438-2509
Job Service North Dakota, the State Board for Vocational & Technical Education, and the Department of Economic Development & Finance collaborated to form Workforce 2000. This is a unique job training resource that goes beyond the Federal government's federally funded programs which are limited in helping expanding or modernizing business. Workforce 2000 provides state funds for supporting business start-ups, expansion, and retention by making available customized retraining and upgrade training for any worker. Workforce 2000 will help businesses undergoing major technological changes, where training is critical to remain competitive.
back to top

Ohio
•Adult Vocational Education Full Service Centers
Ohio Department of Education
Division of Vocational and Adult Education
Business/Industrial Training and Development
65 South Front St., Room 907
Columbus, OH 43215
614-466-3430
Fax: 614-644-5702
There are 36 Adult Vocational Full Service Centers located across the state of Ohio. Center programs and services include job assessment, employee testing and assessment, technical skill training, customized training for specific business and industry needs, seminar development, career counseling, and job placement. For businesses and other organizations, the Centers serve as an out-of-house training and development solution. They are also a human resources tool for classifying job skills and evaluating related individual abilities. In addition, the Centers offer support programs which help students access needed resources such as child care and financial aid.
Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
200 North High St., Room 605
Columbus, OH 43215
614-469-7375
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations, or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Civilian Conservation Corps
Ohio Department of Natural Resources
Division of Civilian Conservation
4383 Fountain Square, Building B-1
Columbus, OH 43224
614-265-6423
This program provides young adults the challenge of learning opportunities, teamwork and the development of a positive work ethic while accomplishing meaningful conservation/recreation projects to benefit the State of Ohio. Corps members start out earning a wage competitive with other training programs and get raises as they work and learn. Members can choose to live at Home or in one of the residential camps where food, lodging, and transportation to work projects is provided. Assistance in obtaining a GED or going to college is also available. To be eligible you must be unemployed, between 18 and 24 years of age, and a resident of the State of Ohio.
Education Initiative for Young Girls
Women's Services Office
Employment Services Bureau
P.O. Box 1618
Columbus, OH 43216-1618
614-466-4496
Fax: 614-466-5025
The Women's Division works to focus attention on current and future employment opportunities for all Ohio women. This state funded booklet is designed for 8th grade female students who are preparing to become a significant part of the work force. The latest edition of this booklet features occupations that will be available in Ohio for high school graduates with vocational or some post-secondary technological training or schooling. The booklet is designed to impress upon young women the correlation between mastering math and science studies and subsequent success in gaining entry into both the traditional and, especially, the non-traditional work force. This publication has received praise and has been reproduced in other states.
Ohio Career Information System
Employment Services
Department of Education
65 South Front St., Room 912
Columbus, OH 432155-4183
614-466-5718
Fax: 614-644-5960
The Ohio Career Information System (OCIS) is a computer-based information system which provides users with educational and occupational information. Approximately 1,700 user sites exist throughout the state, Users include youth and adults affiliated with public, primary and secondary schools; two and four-year colleges; correctional facilities; the Ohio Industrial Commission; the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission; and other public, non-profit, and private job training institutions. A combination of state funds and user fees support the program. The target population starts with the 7th grade, continues through 12th grade, and also is used by adults.
Ohio Industrial Training Program
Ohio Department of Development
Ohio Industrial Training Program
77 South High St.
P.O. Box 1001
Columbus, OH 43266-0101
614-466-4155
800-848-1300
Fax: 614-644-1789
The Ohio Industrial Training Program (OITP) is designed to provide financial assistance and resources for customized training involving employees of new and expanding Ohio manufacturing businesses and will consider other industries creating a large number of new jobs. The program links Ohio's public educational system (vocational, technical, and universities) to the needs of industry by acting as a brokering source of specialized training services. Financial assistance may be provided for business and industry where there is manufacture and/or assembly of goods or information production, for verifiable retention of jobs, expansion of industry through capital investments, or for new industry. Funding is conducted through the regional OITP Office on reimbursement basis, for a portion of training expenses incurred, including (but not limited to): instructor costs, materials, special needs, such as assessment, curriculum development and software rentals. Companies that are requesting up to $10,000 in training funds may apply for the OITP Mini-Grant. Regardless of the size of the company, the training proposals are evaluated on the same criteria as the standards competitive proposals (number of new or retained jobs, number trained, etc.) and are subject to the same guidelines as the standard grants.
Secondary Job Training
Vocational and Adult Education Division
Employment Education Section
Department of Education
65 South Front St., Room 907
Columbus, OH 43215
614-466-3430
Fax: 614-466-5702
This program prepares youths and adults to make informed career choices; to achieve personal and family goals; and to successfully enter, compete, and advance in a changing work world. All of Ohio's 11th and 12th grade secondary students have access to comprehensive vocational education programs through 94 Vocational Education Planning Districts (VEPD). Approved educational agencies within the VEPD's determine the programs to be implemented based on analysis of state and local labor markets. Students are offered a variety of programs targeting those occupations projected to have the largest annual growth in Ohio through the year 2000.
Women's Conference
Women's Services Office
Employment Services Bureau
P.O. Box 1618
Columbus, OH 43216-1618
614-466-4496
Fax: 614-466-5025
Kaleidoscope...A Conference for Women is a dynamic conference offering a unique education and training opportunity for women. Workshops including wellness, personal finance, communications, and education provide a kaleidoscope of educational experiences. The conference remains affordable because of the generous contributions from conference partners and volunteers. Contact this office for more information on upcoming conferences.
Workforce Development
Ohio Bureau of Employment Services
145 South Front St.
Columbus, OH 43212
614-466-0582
This program promotes projects to employers and employees to increase Ohio's high skill workforce by giving employers the tools needed to upgrade the skills of their employees and to create and increase knowledge of workforce development resources. The agency wants to continue to improve the basic skill of Ohio workers which will result in employers having a larger supply of skilled workers and reducing the cost of recruitment, hiring, and training employees.
back to top

Oklahoma
•Training for Industry Program
Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education
Training for Industry Program
1500 West 7th Ave.
Stillwater, OK 74074-4364
405-743-5530
Fax: 405-743-6821
Training for new and expanding industry is provided through the Training for Industry Program (TIP). It is delivered through a statewide network of 29 area vo-tech schools equipped at a cost of more than $50 million. TIP provides customized training that meets companies specific needs. Employees are trained in the process and on the equipment used by the company. Programs range from basic skills, through Total Quality Management and ISO 9000, to the latest in organizational design and management training. TIP will assist with the recruitment and assessment of a customized employee training program at no cost. Representatives from the company and Vo-Tech meet to assess the competencies needed in each job category and to design the training program. A statement of understanding that outlines responsibilities, areas and length of training, number of employees to be trained, and any special requirements will be developed. There are no applications to complete or reviews by committees.
back to top

Oregon
•Apprenticeship Program
Director of Apprentice and Training Division
Bureau of Labor and Industries
800 NE Oregon St., #32
Portland, OR 97232
503-731-4070
Fax: 503-731-4103
This state funded program registers apprentices and employers who serve as training agents. Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job training and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a high skilled occupation. Apprenticeship programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations, or management and labor groups. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. There are currently more than 7,000 registered apprentices with over 4,500 employers registered as training agents in Oregon.
Career Information System
Cheryl Buhl, Director
Career Information System
1244 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-1244
800-459-1266
541-346-2345
Fax: 541-346-2346
The mission of the Career Information System (CARES) is to collect current labor market and educational data and develop it into useful career information; provide a practical means of access to career information by individuals who need it; and to promote the integration of career information into schools and social agencies. Using this system you can obtain information on such topics as: occupational descriptions and preparations; industry descriptions and employment; programs of study and training, including short-term training programs, descriptions, and schools in Oregon; job search and employers; entrepreneurship; and military occupations and worklife. Currently CARES has 545 user sites located across the state.
Educational Aids for Veterans
Public Information
Department of Veterans Affairs
Oregon Veterans' Building
700 Summer St., NE, Suite 150
Salem, OR 97310-1201
800-692-9666
503-373-2085
Fax: 503-373-2362
TDD: 503-373-2217
Oregon Educational Aid benefits, up to $50 a month, are available to certain veterans who take approved college courses. These courses must be taken in an accredited Oregon school, except when the course of study is not available in Oregon. Benefits are paid for classroom instruction needed as part of an apprenticeship program or other on-the-job training programs. Benefits are also paid for Home study courses and for vocational flight training.
Employer-at-Injury Program
Reemployment Assistance Unit
Benefits Section
Workers' Compensation Division
Department of Consumer and Business Services
350 Winter NE
Salem, OR 97310
800-445-3948
Salem: 503-945-7585
Medford: 541-776-6032
The Employer-at-Injury Program helps reduce employer claim costs and helps workers remain productive while recovering from on-the-job injuries. The program offers reimbursements to eligible Oregon employers who return their injured workers to light duty work while their claims are open. Reimbursements can include up to three months 50% wage subsidy; $2,500 for worksite modification; $750 for tuition, books and fees necessary to update the worker's existing skills or to meet the requirements of the job; $1,000 for tools and equipment required for the job; and $400 for required clothing. This program is funded by worker and employer cents-per-hour assessments and contributions to the Worker Benefit Fund.
JOBS Plus
Welfare Reform Manager
Oregon Department of Human Resources
Adult and Family Services Division
500 Summer St., NE
Salem, OR 97310-1013
503-945-6115
Fax: 503-373-7492
TDD: 503-945-5895
JOBS Plus is an added component of the existing federal JOBS Program in six Oregon counties. Use of $2.7 million in lottery funding was approved to cover start-up costs of the three-year demonstration project. JOBS Plus participants are placed in limited duration, on the job training in private businesses, where they earn at least the minimum wage. Participants are paid by employers, who are then reimbursed by the state for minimum wages and payroll taxes. The employer assigns a workplace mentor to help participants learn job skills and good work habits. Participants do not lose any benefits and in most cases brings an increase. Each participant has an Individual Education Account established, into which the employer contributes $1 for each hour worked. These funds will be available to the participant for further education after the worker finds unsubsidized employment.
Preferred Worker Program
Reemployment Assistance Unit
Benefits Section
Workers' Compensation Division
Department of Consumer and Business Services
350 Winter NE
Salem, OR 97310
800-445-3948
Salem: 503-945-7585
Medford: 541-776-6032
The Preferred Worker Program provides incentives to Oregon employers who hire or reemploy workers with a permanent disability who can't return to regular work because of an Oregon on-the-job injury. The incentives include six months at 50% wage subsidy; up to $25,000 for worksite modification; exemption from paying workers compensation premiums for the Preferred Worker for up to three years; full claim cost payment for the life of the claim if the Preferred Worker has a new accepted, compensable on-the-job injury during the premium exemption period; and payment for certain items needed to obtain or maintain employment, such as tools, clothing, or tuition, books and fees for a class or course of instruction to update existing skills or to meet the requirements of an obtained job. This program is funded by worker and employer cents-per-hour assessments and contributions to the Worker Benefit Fund.
Workforce Development Programs
Economic Development Department
Industry Development Division
Workforce Development Section
775 Summer St., NE
Salem, OR 97310
503-986-0206
In OR:800-223-3306
Fax: 503-581-5115
TDD: 503-986-0123
The Department directly operates three industry workforce development programs: Targeted Training, Key Industry Training, and Capacity Building. The Targeted Training program works with business, develops the need for and negotiates to award grants to community colleges and others for training programs customized to the needs of the specific new, or expanding businesses. The Key Industry Training program awards grants to community colleges and others for training programs addressing the common training needs of two or more businesses within an industry, profession or association. The Capacity Building program awards grants to unions and trade associations to build their capacity for addressing long-term training and education needs. All three programs are funded through the Oregon State Lottery.
Worksite Redesign Program
Workers' Compensation Division
Department of Consumer and Business Services
350 Winter NE
Salem, OR 97310
503-945-7585
503-378-3272
The Worksite Redesign Program offers research and development grants to Oregon employers and employer groups. Grants are awarded to develop and put into use solutions to workplace ergonomic problems that lead to on-the-job injuries and illnesses and that can't be solved with readily available equipment and technology. This program is funded by worker and employer cents-per-hour assessments and contributions to the worker Benefit Fund.
back to top

Pennsylvania
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
Federal Building
228 Walnut St., Room 773
Harrisburg, PA 17108
717-782-3496
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations, or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Customized Job Training Program
Office of Technology Development
Department of Commerce
352 Forum Building
Harrisburg, PA 17120
717-787-4147
Fax: 717-234-4560
The objectives of the Customized Job Training (CJT) Program are to improve skill levels of employees and their ability to obtain higher quality jobs through training; creation of new jobs or retention of jobs that would otherwise be lost; inclusion in the work force of significant number of dislocated workers, displaced Home makers and public assistance recipients; and the improvement of the ratio of net new hires to upgraded jobs funded by the CJT Program. CJT enables businesses to improve efficiency, lower costs or otherwise better compete in the global marketplace through the expansion of existing businesses; new business start-ups or relocation of firms from out of state; and increased levels of capital investment which will require training. Costs covered under this program include the trainer's salary, materials, administration costs, and some curriculum development.
Education Programs
Office of Postsecondary and Higher Education
Department of Education
333 Market St.
Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333
717-787-4313
Fax: 717-783-5420
The Department of Education administers a wide range of programs designed to serve various target groups. Most funds are directed to local education agencies including school districts, area vocational-technical schools, and community colleges, for the support of secondary and post-secondary education. Programs include Secondary Vocational Education which subsidizes school districts and area vocational technical schools for the higher costs of secondary vocational education and to improve vocational educational programs; Adult Affidavits subsidizes school districts and area vocational technical schools for providing vocational extension and pre-employment training for out-of-school youths and adults; Health Occupations/Schools of Practical Nursing subsidizes secondary education agencies for providing health occupational/licensed practical nursing programs for out-of-school youths and adults; and community college Variable Stipend supports the higher costs of occupational-technical training programs in community colleges, and to encourage community colleges to develop curricula designed to further industrial development, reduce unemployment and improve employability skills.
The New Directions Program
Special Programs Unit
Department of Labor and Industry
Bureau of Employment Services and Training
Harrisburg, PA 17121
717-787-6915
Fax: 717-787-5785
The New Directions Program focuses on the extensive use of education, skill training, employment services and supportive services such as child care, transportation, extended medical coverage, etc., to increase the potential for clients to secure and maintain long-term employment that will enable them to be self-supporting. The program builds on the strengths of previous employment and training activities while redirecting resources and efforts to provide a wider range of services to all welfare clients who can most benefit from these services. New Directions is driven fundamentally by client needs. Because the aspiration and needs of individual welfare clients vary depending upon their educational background, prior work history and family circumstances, a wide range of employment and training services are needed to help these welfare clients achieve self-sufficiency.
Pennsylvania Literacy Corps
Office of Postsecondary and Higher Education
Department of Education
333 Market St.
Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333
717-787-5532
Fax: 717-783-5420
The purpose of the Pennsylvania Literacy Corps is to increase training of citizens in need of literacy instruction by preparing college students to serve as tutors through a credit-bearing college course. Since the beginning of the program in fiscal year 1989-1990, 2,000 tutors have provided services to approximately 5,500 individuals.
Single Point of Contact (SPOC) Program
Special Programs Unit
Department of Labor and Industry
Bureau of Employment Services and Training
Harrisburg, PA 17121
717-787-6915
Fax: 717-787-5785
The SPOC Program was specifically designed to provide intensive educational, employment services, and skill training to clients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC, AFDC/U) and eligible General Assistance (GA) clients. The resources from three state departments (Labor and Industry, Public Welfare and Education) were combined and utilized to provide services to New Directions clients who could benefit from enhanced educational, training, and employment services. The full implementation of the Family Support Act has provided additional resources to the Commonwealth to expand services to AFDC, AFDC/U and GA clients (in all 67 counties of Pennsylvania) who require educational, training and employment services in order to reduce their dependency on welfare.
back to top

Rhode Island
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
Federal Building
100 Hartford Ave.
Providence, RI 02909
401-528-5198
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
College Tuition Waiver
Jack Hurley, Administrative Benefits
R.I. Department of Labor
101 Friendship St.
Providence, RI 02903
401-277-3651
An individual receiving unemployment insurance is eligible to enroll in any course, for credit, in any college or university operated by the state, without the payment of any tuition or registration fees, provided there is a vacancy in the class. While attending classes the individual must still actively seek employment. If an individual has exhausted benefits within 60 days before the start of a class for which that individual has registered, they will still be eligible for benefits. An individual whose tuition benefits have become exhausted after they start a class, shall be eligible for continuation of tuition benefits until the completion of the class.
Job Training Assistance for Business
Rhode Island Human Resources investment Council (HRIC)
Department of Employment and Training
101 Friendship St.
Providence, RI 02903
401-277-6700
Fax: 401-277-6999
TDD: 401-277-3718
The HRIC provides assistance to businesses to provide job training skills to their employees. The HRIC is a significant component of the state's employment and training coordination efforts by responding to the workforce and economic development challenges which are not addressed by federally funded programs. Key HRIC initiatives include: Competitiveness Improvement Program, Project Upgrade, Adult Literacy Collaborative, Regional Employment and Training Boards, grants to the Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation to finance training for new jobs resulting from economic expansion, funding support for Rhode Island Manufacturing Extension Service, support for the Rhode Island Export Assistance Center, support of Rhode Island Area Coalition for Excellence, funding for Rhode Islands School-to-Work Program, support of Rhode Island Skills Commission activities, funding for Jobs for Rhode Island Grads Program, funding for HRIC/United Way "Making it Work" Project, and creation of a statewide customer-friendly "One-Stop" system.
back to top

South Carolina
•Continuing Education Programs
Economic Development Division
State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Training
111 Executive Center Dr.
Columbia, SC 29210
803-737-9321
Fax: 803-737-9371
Continuing education programs can be structured as certificate programs or as customized programs designated to improve specific workplace skills. Courses are often customized to meet the employer's specific training objectives. State technical colleges have worked directly with employers to train workers using proprietary processes producing proprietary products. South Carolina's technical colleges provide instructors and develop course materials and education programs are offered at Technical College campuses, employer's facilities, and mobile training facilities.
back to top

South Dakota
•Customized Industrial Training
Governor's Office of Economic Development
711 East Wells Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501-3369
800-872-6190
605-773-5032
TDD: 605-773-3256
The Governor's Office of Economic Development coordinates all employee training programs for the Department of Labor and the four Technical Institutes located in the state. The Customized Industrial Training program allows training to be customized to meet the needs of any new or expanding South Dakota employer. Training is normally done in a classroom setting with a qualified instructor coordinated through one of the four Technical Institutes. Companies help design curriculum content and participant screening requirements, and commit to hire trained participants. Funding is available to train eligible participants for entry level employment. The payment made to the employer is considered compensation for extraordinary training costs. Employers who commit to a post training wage or $8 per hour are eligible for this program.
Specialized Training Programs
Economic Development Division
State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Training
111 Executive Center Dr.
Columbia, SC 29210
803-737-9321
Fax: 803-737-9371
South Carolina's technical education (TECH) system is regarded as one of the nation's best. TECH's 15 resource centers offer specialized training programs for manufacturers and non-manufacturing businesses. The resource centers constantly update offerings in keeping with the business climate. The TECH system also offers mobile training units, making equipment and instructors available throughout the state.
back to top

Tennessee
•Industrial Training Service
Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development
Industrial Training Service
Suite 660, Volunteer Plaza
500 James Robertson Parkway
Nashville, TN 37243-0406
615-741-1746
In TN: 800-342-8470
Outside TN:800-251-8594
Fax: 615-741-0607
The Industrial Training Service (ITS) offers customized training as an incentive for creating new jobs. The Service is offered to manufacturing and service sector businesses. Using ITS a business can open its doors quickly and expand as new production technologies are developed. The major ITS benefits include: Preemployment Training has special programs designed to focus on developing basic skills in new employees; On-the Job Training focuses on the development of specific skills and knowledge vital to production; System Support Training may include courses on new methods for increased mechanization, personnel interaction, quality and materials handling; Supervisory and Leadership Skills is designed to develop those skills essential for general supervision as well as the basics of leadership behavior; Training for Unique Equipment and Processes, in some cases, training programs are developed for companies involved in new equipment or processes within the new plant or expansion; and Training Materials developed for new employees and instructors participating in ITS programs.
back to top

Texas
•Skills Development Fund
Texas Workforce Commission
101 East 15th St.
Austin, TX 78778
512-475-2216
Fax: 512-475-2321
The Skills Development fund (SDF) is intended to aid public community and technical colleges in meeting industry and workforce training needs. SDF will award grants to businesses and labor unions for training programs designed for their specific needs and carried out through contracts with public community and technical colleges throughout the state. In regions without a community or technical college, businesses may request a non-local college to provide training. SDF grants are designed to cover the costs of program design, actual instruction, texts, and reusable equipment. Businesses or labor unions that need equipment specialized to their operations will be expected to supply it. SDF has two distinct goals: the creation of new jobs, whether through business start-ups or the expansion or relocation of existing businesses in Texas; and the creation of a highly trained and competitive Texas workforce.
Smart Jobs Fund
Texas Department of Commerce
Business Development Division
Smart Jobs Fund
P.O. Box 12728
Austin, TX 78771
512-936-0190
Fax: 512-936-0188
TDD: 512-936-0555
The Smart Jobs Fund is a business incentive program that assists Texas businesses in training their work force for jobs that lead to opportunities for advancement. The Smart Jobs Fund provides grants to employers for customized training in occupations that are in the manufacturing sector, emerging technologies, and in demand. The program is "employer driven", which means the employer determines what training is needed for their work force, so long as they meet the requirements set forth by the Legislature. These requirements include certain salary levels, and employer match, and a worker retention period of three months after the training project is completed.
back to top

Utah
•Career Apprenticeship Starts Here (C.A.S.H.) Program
Utah State Office of Education
250 East 500 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
801-538-7889
Fax: 801-538-7521
The C.A.S.H. Program is a state-of-the-art program developed to provide high school students with a carefully supervised combination of the on-the-job training and classroom instruction they will need to prepare them to achieve their career goals. Any student at least 16 years of age who wishes to begin a career in an apprenticeable occupation may participate in the program. The advantages for employers who participate in the program includes: identifies training which is nationally recognized by the industry; provide systematic and structured form of training; attracts applicants who possess a firm background in reading, writing, and mathematics; promotes long-term employee commitment; and reduces training cost. This is a voluntary program involving no cost to the employer or the apprentice.
Emergency Work Program
Office of Family Support
Department of Human Resources
P.O. Box 45500
Salt Lake City, UT 84145-0500
801-538-3964
This program is for unemployed single parents and couples without children and unemployed two-parent families who do not qualify for Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) assistance. Services provided include assessment and development of a self sufficiency plan and assignment to a work project site. Clients in the emergency Work Program are paid by the program while working at a work site. The employer does not pay the client but is asked to provide the client with basic work skills. Monthly grants are divided into pay periods and pay days to simulate the work environment. Payment is made only for those hours actually completed or excused. Child care reimbursements are made for participants with children.
General Assistance Self Sufficiency Program
Office of Family Support
Department of Human Resources
P.O. Box 45500
Salt Lake City, UT 84145-0500
801-538-3964
This program either provides money to correct a client's medical problem so that the client can return to work or provides direction in pursuing another line of work that does not conflict with the medical condition. These clients are paid a monthly grant in line with Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) grant levels. Additional services are assessment and development of a self-sufficiency plan, assignment to one or more self-sufficiency activities, follow up and referral to allied agencies. Contract services are provided such as self esteem groups, legal services for Social Security Insurance appeals, and Job Service Workshops. Clients served are individuals and couples without children and those over 60 years of age who are medically unable to work at least 30 days or who are marginally employable. Clients normally posses a statement of disability that is provided by a psychologist, the Office of Rehabilitation, or a doctor or other who determines disability.
Short Term Intensive Training
Department of Community and Economic Development
Division of Business and Economic Development
324 South State, Fifth Floor
Salt Lake City, UT 84114
801-538-8700
Fax: 801-538-8888
The Short Term Intensive Training (STIT) programs are customized and designed to meet full-time job openings. Programs are usually less than one year in length and will be designed to meet the specific training needs of a company while matching needs with people seeking employment. Although potential employees must pay tuition to participate, STIT can provide qualified employees from which a company can hire. STIT gives the option of training at 50-70% discount of normal training cost. Funding for this program is distributed to State Colleges.
Single Head of Household Program
Department of Community & Economic Development
Office of Job Training for Economic Development
324 South State St., Fifth Floor
Salt Lake City, UT 84114-7162
801-538-8750
The Single Head of Household Program is designed to break the cycle of welfare dependency by moving economically disadvantaged single parents into permanent, self sustaining employment through a variety of education, job training, and support services. The programs goals are: placement in a job with a beginning wage which exceeds $6 per hour with health benefits; placements are made in areas with opportunities for advancement; and the long term impact of the program is measured by decreased welfare payments made by the state and an increase in taxes paid.
Utah Custom Fit Training
Dale Stephens
Business/Industry Relations Specialist
Applied Technology Education Services
Utah State Office of Education
250 East 500 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
801-538-7867
Fax: 801-538-7521
TDD: 801-538-7876
Custom Fit Training is a tool for bringing business and education together by assisting businesses with their training needs. New and expanding businesses can participate as well as businesses in need of revitalization. Activities include instruction, curriculum development, assessment, and on-the-job training. Eligible applicants are for-profit enterprises or services. State priorities are technical training needs for business to encourage economic growth in the state and to involve education institutions assisting these businesses/industries. The following guidelines apply: training is short-term; company must be new, expanding, or in need of revitalization; trainees must be full time; company must meet regional minimum wage standards; and all funding is subject to legislative appropriation and State Board of Education approval. The range and average of financial assistance is a maximum of $500 per trainee, with an average of $250 per trainee. Actual levels of funding are determined by regional coordinators based on need and availability of funds.
Vocational Rehabilitation
Utah State Office of Rehabilitation
250 East 500 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
800-473-7530
Fax: 801-538-7522
Voice/TDD: 801-538-7530
Persons whose disability prevents them from getting or keeping suitable employment may apply for vocational rehabilitation services. After eligibility is determined, assessment information is used to develop an Individualized Written Rehabilitation Program plan that is designed to assist the individual in preparing for and obtaining employment. Throughout the planning process, emphasis is placed on informed client choice of a vocational goal, services, and providers of services. When the client is ready for a job, placement service assistance is provided according to need identified in the individual plan. After the client begins working, the counselor provides follow-up to make sure the client is satisfied and the job is appropriate.
back to top

Vermont
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
Federal Building
11 Elmwood Ave., Room 629
Burlington, VT 05401
802-951-6278
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations, or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Vermont Training Program
Department of Economic Development
109 State St.
Montpelier, VT 05609
800-341-2211
802-828-3221
Fax: 802-828-3258
The Vermont Training Program promotes industrial expansion and encourages the creation of jobs in manufacturing by providing training for new and existing businesses. Individually designed programs may include on-the-job, classroom, skill upgrade, or other specialized training which are mutually agreed upon between the state and the employer. The program helps companies with new labor force for start-up or expansion, attracts new companies to the state, assists existing companies to remain competitive in production technology and product lines, helps currently employed individuals raise their skill levels and obtain better jobs within their company and improves the skills of a regional labor pool in anticipation of the needs for existing or incoming industries. Requirements for companies requesting assistance include agreeing to pay wages equal to at least twice minimum wage at the completion of training and providing a minimum of 50% of the overall training costs.
Veterans Preference in State Employment
Office of the Adjutant General
State Veterans Affairs
120 State St.
Montpelier, VT 05620-4401
802-828-3379
In certification for appointment, in appointment, in employing, in retention of employment position, whether in classified or unclassified civil service, whether for temporary or for extended time, wherever state funds furnish the payroll, preference is given to veterans, their wives or widows. Contact this office for complete information on this program and for more information on eligibility requirements.
back to top

Virginia
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
700 Centre, Suite 546
704 East Franklin St.
Richmond, VA 23219
804-771-2488
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations, or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Transportation Trainee and Intern Programs
Chester Kelly
Engineer Trainee Administrator
Human Resources Division
1401 East Broad St.
Richmond, VA 23219
804-371-6915
Fax: 804-786-2940
The Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT), sponsors two entry-level programs: the Engineer Trainee Program and the Administrative Intern Program. The objective of the Engineer Trainee Program is to orient the entry level engineer to the major functions of the Department; provide a system of diverse, structured training assignments to assist the trainee in gaining practical experience and developing their abilities more rapidly than would otherwise be possible; and produce knowledgeable and skilled transportation engineers who are prepared to advance into increasingly responsible engineering, supervisory, and administrative positions within VDOT. The Administrative Trainee Program's objective is to provide job incumbents who have undergraduate or graduate degrees and little or no work experience with two years of structured practical work experience related to their academic field, within the agency's administrative divisions.
Virginia VIEW Program
Virginia Tech
205 West Roanoke St.
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0527
In VA: 800-542-5780
540-231-7571
The Commonwealth of Virginia funds Virginia VIEW as its Career Information Delivery Service. Virginia VIEW is a state project operated through Virginia Tech. The project provides information on specific occupations and other relevant labor force information that is updated annually. Occupation Search generates a list of occupations matching users personal preferences in including preferences in the area of work, interests, and education. College Search matches users preferences with Virginia community colleges and 2 & 4 year public and private institutions. This information is available in an interactive computer program, in tabloid form and on microfiche. Each fall, 25 workshops are conducted across the state to distribute the updated products and train clients in their use. Users are typically counselors at schools, colleges, in private practice and rehabilitative services, or employment services professions. Virginia VIEW also operates a toll free Career Information Hotline (800-542-5870) that people may call with career questions.
Workforce Services
Department of Economic Development
P.O. Box 798
901 East Byrd St.
Richmond, VA 23206-0796
804-371-8100
Fax: 804-371-8137
Since 1965, Workforce Services has been a unique program which offers consulting services and training assistance for new and expanding industries. Any company that creates 25 or more new jobs or makes a capital investment of at least $1,000,000 within a one-year period is eligible to be assisted with consulting services, video production services, and funding. Workforce Services will assist in coordinating the client's specific training needs with any one or more of Virginia's institutions of education including: vocational education, community college, and the four-year institutions. The following activities are legitimate uses for the program funds: consulting services, training analysis, recruitment/pre-employment assessment, video production services, train-the-trainer, instructors, productivity/continuous improvement programs, and training. Funding for each program will be based on estimated tax benefits generated within a one-year period for each new job created and filled and the cost estimate developed during the program's design. Companies will be reimbursed three months after the new employee's hire date. All services are available for full-time wage and non-exempt positions working 30 or more hours with benefits.
back to top

Washington
•Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Council
1400 Talbot Rd. South, Suite 100
Renton, WA 98055
206-277-5214
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Career Transition Services
Department of Personnel
P.O. Box 47500
Olympia, WA 98504
360-664-3302
Fax: 360-586-4694
State employees impacted by reduction-in-force (RIF) have a wide range of resources and services available to them through the Career Transition Services. Workshops have been developed to help employees with the various aspects of their job search. New workshops are added as the need arises for additional topics to be covered. Other services available include: one-on-one guidance from professional employment specialists on all aspects of conducting a job search; the RIF Transition Pool offers employees impacted by RIF an alternative opportunity for finding reemployment within state service; and the Office of Personnel will place the names of eligible employees on agency and service-wide reduction-in-force registers for referral to appropriate vacancies. Resources available include personal computers and printers, career and job search handbooks, copiers, telephones and fax machines.
Claimant Placement Program
Dwight Wood
Employment Security Department
212 Maple Park
Olympia, WA 98504
360-438-4020
Participants are provided assistance in developing plans for successfully seeking employment. Services include workshops teaching job search skills, assistance in contacting employers, and other employment seeking skills. The program protects the solvency of the Washington State Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund by reducing the average length of a claimant?s period of unemployment. The Claimant Placement Program is delivered through a network of 20 Job Service Centers throughout the state.
Contract Testing
Susan Cooper
Employment Security Department
605 Woodland Square Loop
P.O. Box 9046
Olympia, WA 98507-9046
360-438-4126
The Contract Testing Program allows qualified agencies and individuals to have access to the US Employment Service proprietary tests through a fee-based test release agreement. The fees charged for the agreements provide the funding to support the necessary monitoring of test usage and training and the appropriate administration and interpretation of the tests. The fees generated from test release agreements have grown to totally support all of the functions of this program.
Corrections Clearinghouse
Doug Jacques
Employment Security Department
P.O. Box 9046, MS 6000
Olympia, WA 98507-9046
360-438-4060
The Corrections Clearinghouse (CCH) provides offenders with employment and training enhancement services. It provides institutional and community linkages, liaison, and advocacy for the offender who is about to be released or has recently been released from a correctional institution. The Transitional Offender Work Orientation Program provides job development and placement, and employment retention and upgrade opportunities. The Offender Employment Program allows individuals to gain knowledge and skills necessary to find and retain employment and training opportunities. Additional functions of CCH include career awareness, pre-release employment preparation, youth employment preparation and youth transition services.
Displaced Home maker Program
Dawn Hitchens
Displaced Home maker Program
Higher Education Coordination Board
917 Lakeridge Way 360-753-7831
P.O. Box 43430
Olympia, WA 98504-3430
Fax: 360-753-7808
TDD: 360-753-7809
A displaced Home maker is an individual who: has worked in the Home for ten or more years providing unsalaried household services for family members on a full-time basis; is not gainfully employed; needs assistance in securing employment; and has been dependent on the income of another family member but is no longer supported by that income, or has been dependent on federal assistance but is no longer eligible for that assistance, or is supported as the parent of minor children by public assistance or spouse support but whose children are within two years of reaching 18 years of age. An important objective of the Displaced Home maker Program is to provide necessary training opportunities, counseling, and services to increase the employability of displaced Home makers. The program established guidelines under which the higher Education Coordinating Board shall contract to establish Multipurpose Service Centers and programs to provide a wide range of educational retraining services, including job readiness, job search and/or job training and job placement for eligible participants.
Industry-Specific Training at Community and Technical Colleges
Dan McConnon or Roy Schmidt
State Board for Community and Technical Colleges
P.O. Box 42495
Olympia, WA 98504-2495
360-753-0878
Fax: 360-753-3650
Each of the 32 community and technical colleges across the state offers workforce skills training and management classes and seminars for business. Customized training can range from basic skills for the workplace, new employee training, upgrade training, and management training. Community and technical colleges can assess the training needs of business or set of businesses and fashion customized training programs for the membership. Both small and large businesses can be served. Fees depend upon the type of training to be offered and the number of people to be trained. In addition to customized training that is open to any worker, colleges offer the state funded training programs for dislocated workers. An association might consider this option if member businesses wish to hire and train dislocated workers.
Job Skills Program (JSP)
Lee Williams
Workforce Training and Education Coordination Board
Building 17
Airsdustrial Park
P.O. Box 43105
Olympia, WA 985044-3105
360-586-3321
This statewide program funds industry-education partnerships from which customized training materials are developed and short-term, job-specific training is delivered. JSP supports up to one-half the total cost of training with the participating companies providing a dollar-for-dollar cash or in-kind match. JSP supports entry-level training for prospective employees before a new plant opens or when a company expands; retraining of a company's current employees when the training is required to prevent the dislocation of those employees; and upgrade skills training of current employees when new vacancies will be created as a result of their promotion into new positions. Awards are granted four times each year, however, accommodation can be made to award funds at other times of the year if the company or companies have an urgent need for training.
back to top

West Virginia
•Governor's Guaranteed Work Force Programs
West Virginia Development Office
1900 Kanawha Blvd., East
Capitol Complex
Building 6, Room B-517
Charleston, WV 255308-0311
800-982-3386
304-558-2234
Fax: 304-558-0449
The Governor's Guaranteed Work Force Program (GGWFP) is West Virginia's customized job training program for both new and existing businesses. The GGWFP can provide up to $1,000 per employee to new companies which create at least 10 new jobs within a 12-month period. The program can also provide up to $1,000 per employee to existing companies which are either expanding or in need of training to retrain employees. The program works with outside training resources to provide a wide range of services. Through its partnerships with agencies such as the Department of Education and the Bureau of Employment Programs, the GGWFP office serves as a one-stop center for businesses requiring work force development.
back to top

Wisconsin
•Adult Literacy Incentive Grant Program
Technical College System Board
P.O. Box 7874
Madison, WI 53707-7874
608-266-1207
Fax: 608-266-1690
Funds are awarded on a competitive basis to Wisconsin Technical College districts that implement educational programs designed to improve basic educational skills of educationally disadvantaged adults. The program provides basic education courses, such as adult high school classes and English as a Second Language classes. Eligible participants are adults who are functioning below the 12th grade level, with priority given to the unemployed, minorities, and persons with disabilities.
Apprenticeship Program
Department of Labor
State Apprenticeship Program
Federal Center, Room 303
212 East Washington Ave.
Madison, WI 53703
608-264-5377
Apprenticeship is a combination of on-the-job and related classroom instruction in which workers learn the practical and theoretical aspects of a highly skilled occupation. Programs are operated voluntarily by employers, employer associations, or management and labor groups. Related classroom instruction is given in the sponsor's training facility or a local technical school or community college. Apprentices earn wages while they learn on the job, starting from about half the journeymen's rate up to 95% of full pay near the end of their apprenticeship. Training periods range from 1-6 years. Most trades require 3-4 years. The State Apprenticeship Council sponsors and funds the program.
Aviation Careers Education (ACE) Program
Bureau of Aeronautics
Department of Transportation
P.O. Box 7914
Madison, WI 53707
608-264-8420
The objectives of this program include: making learning more interesting and meaningful so students stay in school; offering clubs that enhance students experiences through contact with individuals at the airport and through extracurricular activities; and providing part time jobs in the field of aviation that will educate students, provide participants with work experience, and fulfill airline employment objectives. Although three Milwaukee public schools currently provide services through the program, only the high school students actually participate in the employment and job training aspects of the program by enrolling in work experience placements through 12 aviation-related businesses and government agencies. Placements typically provided participants with work experience in maintenance, customer service, parking and aircraft fueling, baggage handling, and clerical and food service work. A coordinator from Milwaukee Public Schools provides oversight of the day-to-day activities of students participating in the work experience program.
Basic Skills Incentive Grant Program
Technical College System Board
P.O. Box 7874
Madison, WI 53707-7874
608-266-1207
Fax: 608-266-1690
The Board awards state funds designated for the Basic Skills Incentive Grant Program to provide additional support to Wisconsin Technical College districts that have implemented programs to improve the reading and employability skills of educationally disadvantaged adults. Specifically, the Basic Skills Incentive Grant Program provides instruction in writing, mathematics, and critical thinking and problem solving. Eligible participants are adults who are functioning below the 12th grade level, with priority given to the unemployed, minorities, and persons with disabilities.
Customized Labor Training Program
Wisconsin Department of Development
123 West Washington Ave.
Madison, WI 53707
608-266-6746
608-266-3075
Fax: 608-264-6151
The Customized Labor Training Program (CLT), encourages businesses, primarily manufacturing, to invest in the retooling and upgrading of equipment, productivity and the labor forces by providing up to 50% of the costs of a workforce training program. Eligible training includes: job training that focuses on new technology, industrial skills or manufacturing processes that are new to the company; job training that is not currently available from other resources and would not take place without state funds; and job training for new or retained positions that will be guaranteed by the company. Quality improvement training my be reimbursed after participation in a manufacturing assessment program. Eligible costs and match include: wages of production-related staff, not including benefits or premiums; training materials; trainer costs, except certain costs for publicly supported schools; and training travel costs. Any business making a firm commitment to locate in Wisconsin or expanding within Wisconsin that is upgrading a product, process, or service that requires worker training in new technology and industrial skills is eligible for the program.
Displaced Home makers' Program
Technical College System Board
P.O. Box 7874
Madison, WI 53707-7874
608-266-1207
Fax: 608-266-1690
This program provides job development and support services to displaced Home makers throughout the state. Its goal is to help displaced Home makers successfully locate and obtain employment and is designed to reduce barriers to employment by offering participants the opportunity to gain marketable skills and eventually secure a job. The Board awards funds designated for the Displaced Haymakers' Program to Wisconsin Technical College districts and community organizations that implement programs to help displaced Home maker successfully find employment. The services available to qualified participants include career counseling, employability assessment, post-placement follow-up, classroom training, and dependent care. The program receives additional funding from the Department of Health and Social Services, which administers a block grant to fund services for displaced Home makers. The program is open to individuals who have worked in the Home for a substantial number of years providing unpaid household services for family members, are not gainfully employed, are experiencing difficulty obtaining a job, and have been dependent on the income of another family member or on public assistance but are no longer supported by such income.
Farm Training Program Tuition Grants
Technical College System Board
P.O. Box 7874
Madison, WI 53707-7874
608-266-1207
Fax: 608-266-1690
This program awards grants to reduce the cost of farm business training for farmers needing financial assistance. The Board reimburses the Wisconsin Technical College districts that offer the Farm Business and Production Management Program and have awarded grants to eligible farmers. The grants, equal to 50% of the tuition costs, provide reimbursement only for tuition costs. Eligible participants are economically disadvantaged farmers, as determined by financial need eligibility, who are enrolled in the first four years of the Farm Business and Production Management Program.
New and Expanding Occupations Incentive Grant Program
Technical College System Board
P.O. Box 7674
Madison, WI 53707-7874
608-266-1207
Fax: 608-266-1690
The Board awards designated state funds on a competitive basis to the Wisconsin Technical College districts that implement programs to improve the employability skills of adults. Grants for New and Expanding Occupations are used to develop and maintain programs, provide instruction in the use of new technology, foster the provision of apprenticeship programs, and upgrade the instruction of journey workers. Program funding primarily supports curriculum development and instructors. The program is available to individuals in the general public who qualify to enroll in postsecondary education programs, with priority given to educationally disadvantaged, unemployed, minorities, and persons with disabilities.
Veterans Education Benefits
Department of Veterans Affairs
Tuition and Fee Reimbursement Grant Programs
P.O. Box 7843
30 West Mifflin St.
Madison, WI 53707-7843
608-266-1311
Veterans, and unremarried spouses and dependents of deceased veterans, who have served on active duty under honorable conditions for other than training purposes in the United States Armed Forces for at least 90 days during a wartime period or conflict are eligible for the following educational benefits: Education Assistance Loan Program-Education Loans, Part-Time Study Grant Program, Retraining Grant Program, and the Tuition and Fee Reimbursement Grant Program. Contact the office listed above for complete information on programs and other eligibility requirements.
Wisconsin Conservation Corps
Wisconsin Conservation Corps
30 West Mifflin, Suite 406
Madison, WI 53703
608-266-7730
The Wisconsin Conservation Corps was created to employ young adults in all regions of the state; conserve the state's natural resources through the implementation of projects with long-term beneficial effects; develop work skills, discipline, cooperation, meaningful work experiences, and training and education opportunities for corps enrollees; and promote social well-being through implementation of projects that include human services activities. The Corps provides basic skills instruction, classroom training, work experience, and career development classes to participants. In addition, a participant who satisfactorily completes the program is eligible for an incentive grant of $500 or an education voucher worth between $1,000 and $1,950.
Workplace Education Incentive Grant Program
Technical College System Board
P.O. Box 7874
Madison, WI 553707-7874
608-266-1207
Fax: 608-266-1690
This state grant program funds adult education programs that provide courses below the post-secondary level, and is designed to improve the occupational skill level of educationally disadvantaged working adults. Courses provided through this program include adult basic education and English as a Second Language, provided by Wisconsin technical colleges in the workplace. This program is available to adults who are functioning below the 12th grade level in Wisconsin businesses, with priority given to small businesses.
back to top

Wyoming
•Light-Duty Work Program
The Division of Workers' Safety and Compensation has a light-duty work provision which allows injured workers to go back to work for their previous employer in a light-duty capacity if they meet the medical requirements as set forth by law. This encourages injured workers to go to work rather than continuing to receive benefits through the program. Injured workers can actually earn more money than they would on the Workers' Compensation program by going back to light-duty work.
Vocational Rehabilitation
Department of Employment
Division of Workers' Safety and Compensation
Herschler Building
122 West 26th St.
Cheyenne, WY 82002
307-777-7159
Fax: 307-777-5805
The Wyoming Division of Workers' Safety and Compensation has a provision that allows injured workers that qualify the option of receiving a disability award or opting for enrollment in a vocational rehabilitation program. This vocational rehabilitation program is designed to get injured workers back to work by retraining and job placement. An individually written rehabilitation program outlines the specific steps necessary for the injured worker to achieve a vocational goal.

back to top

Thanks to: Mary Ann Martello, Editor; Dixie St. John, Director of Research; Jo Ann Burton, Research; Anna Christenbury, Research; Christyna Copeland, Research; Angela Davidson, Research; Nancy Gibson, Research; Susan Harris, Research; Sandy Hendricks, Research; Frances Kingery, Research; Alex Klapat, Research; Corlyn Krinsky, Research; Elizabeth Leik, Research; Elizabeth Lukes, Research; Cindy Price, Research; Connie Pryor, Research; Amanda St. John, Research; Liz Sweeney, Research; Michelle Thomas, Research; Ed Foti and Jack Lyons, Web Support; Karen Strong, Technical Support; Kim Mattison, Web Construction

Matthew Lesko General Help Health Help Mental Health Help Housing Help Business Help
Job Help Education and Training Help Financial and Estate Help Legal Help Help for Kids and Pets I Want to Help
 

Follow Matthew Lesko on Twitter and FaceBook

 


©
Matthew Lesko/Information USA 12081 Nebel St. Rockville, MD 20852 800/955-7653
email us www.leskobooks.com